Hanix Mini Giant excavator?

Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
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Assembled as far as possible for now.
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Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
May 19, 2011
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Peoria, AZ
The next stumbling block is removing the worn out bushings & spacers in the stick.
No amount of penetrating oil, heat, or cold combined with a 10 ton hydraulic gear/bearing puller/pusher will get them to move. (at all)
Next step will be to try and split the bushings with a tungsten carbide grit hacksaw blade, then use the puller/pusher.
They are steel, as hard as a file, and have probably been in there since the late '70s.
If that doesn't work (or takes too long), I will have to split them by grinding a groove with a dremel style tool with small grinding stones.

I would love to saw them lengthwise with dremel cutoff discs, but I can't find a dremel or die grinder with a suitable 90 degree head that will fit inside a 30mm (1.181) diameter bore.

Maybe I should make something.....
 
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fried1765

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The next stumbling block is removing the worn out bushings & spacers in the stick.
No amount of penetrating oil, heat, or cold combined with a 10 ton hydraulic gear/bearing puller/pusher will get them to move. (at all)
Next step will be to try and split the bushings with a tungsten carbide hacksaw blade, then use the puller/pusher.
They are steel, as hard as a file, and have probably been in there since the late '70s.
If that doesn't work (or takes too long), I will have to split them by grinding a groove with a dremel style tool with small grinding stones.

I would love to saw them lengthwise with dremel cutoff discs, but I can't find a dremel or die grinder with a suitable 90 degree head that will fit inside a 30mm (1.181) diameter bore.

Maybe I should make something.....
I trust that you will figure it out!
 

Yooper

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The next stumbling block is removing the worn out bushings & spacers in the stick.
No amount of penetrating oil, heat, or cold combined with a 10 ton hydraulic gear/bearing puller/pusher will get them to move. (at all)
Next step will be to try and split the bushings with a tungsten carbide hacksaw blade, then use the puller/pusher.
They are steel, as hard as a file, and have probably been in there since the late '70s.
If that doesn't work (or takes too long), I will have to split them by grinding a groove with a dremel style tool with small grinding stones.

I would love to saw them lengthwise with dremel cutoff discs, but I can't find a dremel or die grinder with a suitable 90 degree head that will fit inside a 30mm (1.181) diameter bore.

Maybe I should make something.....
Are you talking sawing it by hand with the hacksaw?
 

Russell King

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The next stumbling block is removing the worn out bushings & spacers in the stick.
No amount of penetrating oil, heat, or cold combined with a 10 ton hydraulic gear/bearing puller/pusher will get them to move. (at all)
Next step will be to try and split the bushings with a tungsten carbide grit hacksaw blade, then use the puller/pusher.
They are steel, as hard as a file, and have probably been in there since the late '70s.
If that doesn't work (or takes too long), I will have to split them by grinding a groove with a dremel style tool with small grinding stones.

I would love to saw them lengthwise with dremel cutoff discs, but I can't find a dremel or die grinder with a suitable 90 degree head that will fit inside a 30mm (1.181) diameter bore.

Maybe I should make something.....
They sell adapters for Dremel tools that are 90 degree heads and another that is a flexible extension that has a smaller size but is not 90 degrees..

At least the did years ago!

I also have a thing that attaches to my 1/4 inch impact driver (for screws). That is a flexible extension that ends with a 90 degree. You might be able to adapt some cutoff wheel to it. The connection is that hex type connector for driver bits.
 

Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
May 19, 2011
7,272
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Peoria, AZ
They sell adapters for Dremel tools that are 90 degree heads and another that is a flexible extension that has a smaller size but is not 90 degrees..
I have both, too big to get in there.
I also have a thing that attaches to my 1/4 inch impact driver (for screws). That is a flexible extension that ends with a 90 degree. You might be able to adapt some cutoff wheel to it. The connection is that hex type connector for driver bits.
I have two different styles, also too big.
 

Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
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Well, it took over 40 minutes of strenuous sawing, with several breaks.
It took a lot of pressure to start a groove, then a lot of pressure to keep it cutting, otherwise the blade would just skate.
As the groove deepened, I tried several times to punch the bearings loose from the inside (where the spacer was) with a big sharp edged punch and a 32oz ball peen, and they finally moved, but still would not come out without the hydraulic pusher.
It took some pretty big hits to break them loose, even after sawing them al the way through.
There is a shallow groove in the bore, but no deal, I will make a new full width bushing virtually identical to the one in post #379.

Not sure I want to use this method on the remaining bushings, at least (2) more sets.
That was a lot of work.

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Lil Foot

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Maybe, might have to check that possibility out.
Thanks.
 
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Lil Foot

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De-burred and reamed the hole to (almost) cleanup.
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bird dogger

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The next stumbling block is removing the worn out bushings & spacers in the stick.
No amount of penetrating oil, heat, or cold combined with a 10 ton hydraulic gear/bearing puller/pusher will get them to move. (at all)
Next step will be to try and split the bushings with a tungsten carbide grit hacksaw blade, then use the puller/pusher.
They are steel, as hard as a file, and have probably been in there since the late '70s.
If that doesn't work (or takes too long), I will have to split them by grinding a groove with a dremel style tool with small grinding stones.

I would love to saw them lengthwise with dremel cutoff discs, but I can't find a dremel or die grinder with a suitable 90 degree head that will fit inside a 30mm (1.181) diameter bore.

Maybe I should make something.....
I've never had reason to try it.....but I've heard you can run a bead of weld around the inside of a steel bushing or broken bearing race that seems to defy all other methods of removal. The cooling weld will shrink the inside diameter of the bushing/bearing race and break the bond between the bore and said bushing/bearing race.

There seems to be merit to that method, but I've never seen it done.
 
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Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
May 19, 2011
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Peoria, AZ
I have used that method years ago on a large tapered roller bearing race in a blind hole in a large electric motor end bell, and it worked perfectly.
But that race was about 4" in diameter, 1/4" to 3/8" thick, & about 5/8" wide.
I frankly do not trust my welding skills enough to try it in such a small diameter hole, on a bushing only .090-.120 (or less) thick. (some of the really worn ones were nearer .060 thick)

I am worried I will get too much penetration, and weld the bushing or spacer in place, and I will be worse off than I am now.
On one hand, it was great working for 30+ years with NASA certified welders on staff, but it really stunted my own meager skills. (no need for me to get better with those guys around :rolleyes: )
I may try it, if I get brave, with the Miller Mig 130 turned way down.

Here is a toob video of this method:
 
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bird dogger

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I have used that method years ago on a large tapered roller bearing race in a blind hole in a large electric motor end bell, and it worked perfectly.
But that race was about 4" in diameter, 1/4" to 3/8" thick, & about 5/8" wide.
I frankly do not trust my welding skills enough to try it in such a small diameter hole, on a bushing only .090-.120 (or less) thick. (some of the really worn ones were nearer .060 thick)

I am worried I will get too much penetration, and weld the bushing or spacer in place, and I will be worse off than I am now.
On one hand, it was great working for 30+ years with NASA certified welders on staff, but it really stunted my own meager skills. (no need for me to get better with those guys around :rolleyes: )
I may try it, if I get brave, with the Miller Mig 130 turned way down.

Here is a toob video of this method:
They do make it look so easy. :ROFLMAO:

It was/is hard to judge the size/materials just from the pics of your parts. But I was thinking along the same lines as you....using .023 wire at a low setting to start. But first, dial in the settings right on a practice scrap piece of material before attacking the actual stuck bushing.

Knowing it doesn't have to be a continuous beautiful bead also helps. Maybe only a couple of good "tacks" will be enough to shrink/shock the stubborn bond loose enough to drive the bushing out? :unsure:
Just in case....leave an open area for the tried and true saw cut for the last resort.
 
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Yooper

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Removing a bearing race or a valve seat that is narrow is one thing, but a long bushing is another animal. Not bad if it is large enough in diameter to comfortably weld, but the small diameters you’re dealing with could be a challenge. Maybe stick welding in a straight line might work? Working half way from each side?
 
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Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
May 19, 2011
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Peoria, AZ
They do make it look so easy. :ROFLMAO:

It was/is hard to judge the size/materials just from the pics of your parts. But I was thinking along the same lines as you....using .023 wire at a low setting to start. But first, dial in the settings right on a practice scrap piece of material before attacking the actual stuck bushing.

Knowing it doesn't have to be a continuous beautiful bead also helps. Maybe only a couple of good "tacks" will be enough to shrink/shock the stubborn bond loose enough to drive the bushing out? :unsure:
Just in case....leave an open area for the tried and true saw cut for the last resort.
Yeah, I was thinking if I tried it, maybe just a single tack, stop, another tack, repeat, etc..
Good point about leaving a spot for sawing. (y)
 
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Lil Foot

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1979 B7100DT Gear, Nissan Hanix N150-2 Excavator
May 19, 2011
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Peoria, AZ
Removing a bearing race or a valve seat that is narrow is one thing, but a long bushing is another animal. Not bad if it is large enough in diameter to comfortably weld, but the small diameters you’re dealing with could be a challenge. Maybe stick welding in a straight line might work? Working half way from each side?
As I said above, maybe just a single tack, stop, another tack, repeat, etc. in parallel straight lines?
I'll ponder it while I start the new bushing for the above reamed hole.
 

North Idaho Wolfman

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My go to now is the plasma cutter.
I also have carbide and composite blades for the sawzall that i use for situations like this.
 
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