Shed upgrade started

Old_Paint

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4 of 10 trusses pointed in the right direction.
18D00627-4640-4D45-89BA-755A97429608.jpeg

Being the only person here that ain’t afraid of heights gets a little inconvenient, so I’ve done most of the work by myself except for gopherin.
 
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Old_Paint

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Got a late start today. Cardiologist insisted I get blood drawn again today to see if my insurance will cover injections for hypercholesterlemia. Seems I may need more frequent oil changes than my LX2610. LDLs are stoopid high.

But, still managed to get 4 more trusses pointed in the right direction and the walls pulled back into a straight line. My photo:

93D94EF0-F68A-4D6A-ABDC-9CA63BF52D62.jpeg

And a couple the missus took:

208DE161-9266-4D7F-967A-4217DCF21CDC.jpeg
 

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Old_Paint

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North side purlins installed and leveled (ok except 1).
1268E23C-CD25-426B-A883-C9B0A6797C86.jpeg
 
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Old_Paint

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All purlins up, straight, and leveled. Silly me forgot some very basic practical science and didn’t use a string on the four purlins on the north roof section. DUUUUUHHHHH! Did all four purlins on the back slope in half the time and half the arboreal acrobatics. With the exception of the faux rafters on the gables, the bones are up and it’s ready for some skin. Even gave a blood sacrifice to the slab in hopes I can get a roof on it by next weekend. Had a small scrape on my left thumb and caught it on one of the screws I had started in one of the purlins. Pretty minor wound, but looked like I needed a transfusion with all the blood on my hand. Sweating profusely at the moment probably didn’t help matters. It be summertime in Alabama boys and girls. The missus is gonna call a strike if I don’t finish it up soon.
 

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Lil Foot

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Looks great!
Man, that would even pass inspection in Coconino county, AZ!
(toughest building codes & inspections in the nation!)
 
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Old_Paint

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Looks great!
Man, that would even pass inspection in Coconino county, AZ!
(toughest building codes & inspections in the nation!)
Still gonna put X-braces between the trusses, The whole thing moves a little bit when I’m playing monkey bars on it. Not much, but you’ll notice there’s no sheathing on it yet and only two diagonal braces on the back walls. Might put a little sheathing on it tomorrow, but only have 4 sheets of plywood at the moment.
 

Old_Paint

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Unfortunately early summer monsoons caught me. Great slow rain all day, didn't even run across the yard because it soaked in very quickly, but a LOT of rain. Again, quite a pool accumulated on the slab. That's ok, though, because the squeegee did it's job beautifully. If nothing else, I can always open up an indoor pool with this thing. Apparently I sealed it very well under the bottom plate. Maybe too well. Might be time to consider some drain holes. That'll be fun.

Had to make an emergency run to Home Depot last night to get a giant tarp to cover this thing up. Got to HF first at about 5 minutes before closing, picked out my tarp, and reached in my pocket for my wallet. I'll give you three guesses what I left laying on the desk. So detour to Home Depot. Turns out, the price for the tarp at HD was actually a little less than I would have paid for two smaller ones at HF. I didn't think I had any reason to use exterior grade OSB or plywood on the trusses, and the stuff I did use was getting a soaking yesterday. I didn't want the glue joints in the trusses affected either (even though they also have 3 screws for every board that meets on a gusset.

Ennyhoo, bought a 30 x 50 tarp that I will likely NEVER use again to cover it up until I can get the roof on it. I never realized how fast rain would gather on a tarp. In minutes, it had what I thought was just a little water on it, that turned out to be thousands of pounds, and I nearly couldn't get the tarp out from under it.

I had to do my gibbon imitation and climb up in the trusses to pull paracord over the top to hoist up the tarp and pull it to the other side. Fortunately, I still had my walk-boards in the trusses, so at least I had that little safety margin. I had a good plan, but the rain wasn't cooperating. I was just going to toss paracord over the top and then pull the tarp over the whole thing. Besides getting soaked to the bone (through a Carhart jacket, mind you), wet paracord isn't very cooperative either. It was less than fun.

Now I gotta get good measurements to order my sheet metal today, which of course means I have to roll the tarp back on the ends so I can measure from top purlin to bottom purlin on all four corners. Ahhh, the life of shed building .....

Got a little sunshine this morning, but it's supposed to start raining again today. I'm hoping to get my entry door and both windows today, and start doing some closing in on this thing. I just don't want to put up any sheathing that might be getting wet continuously for a couple weeks, and EVERY day has rain forecast for the next three weeks. Looks like I may be stock-piling materials and maybe doing some planning for tool racks and pallet shelves, and general shop layout. Work benches to build, etc, lots of stuff to do now that I can deflect the rain even if on a temporary basis. There's always the electrical stuff that needs doing. The one part of the shed that's closest to my occupation SHOULD be the easiest part of the build except for the fact it's gonna take a lotta climbing. (AGAIN) I'll be 63 this month, and climbing ain't exactly my forte any more. Not afraid of it, but my sore and stiff joints get sorer and stiffer. Uncle Arthur (arthritis) has NOT been kind, and fighting a tarp in the rain is the LAST thing my stiff joints wanted to do.
 

Old_Paint

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Had a turd-floatin-frog-stranglin-gully-washin rain storm this afternoon. It rained like a cow peein' on a flat rock. A good bit blew in under the eaves, but none came through the tarp and it didn't cave in my trusses, but I still got a cement pond on my slab. Just no Ellie Mae to go along with it. Looks like the tarp is gonna keep my trusses from turning to mush before I get the roofing, so over all, worth every penny spent. Just didn't count on having to buy something I'd only use once, but isn't that what happens to nails or paint? Ordered the roofing today. Also picked up the electrical bits and will probably just do some wiring tomorrow if the weather doesn't calm down and stop some of the rain. Or, if my roofing order is ready, I'll take a ride across the county to go pick it up. Was pretty amazed when they told me everything I needed was in stock. Just a matter of cutting the sheets to length.

Eventually things will dry out again. So far this year, we've not had a single day over 88 degrees. Normally by now, we're looking at 100 degree days with 98% humidity. Bloody global warming ......
 
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Old_Paint

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Lil’ O’s new house lit up the first time. Overhead wiring done. Running whole circuit with a cheater cord plugged into an extension cord from the old shed. Hoping to reverse that situation sooner than later. Once I get the roof on, I’ll call the inspector. He said all he needed to see was the bones and the juice. gonna put one receptacle on each end, two on the back wall, two on the front wall, and one exterior outlet with GFCI to help keep me from frying myself.

Picking up the roofing materials tomorrow.

Doc said I can’t go back to work for at least another month today. Got an MRI scheduled for my neck and nerve response test for carpal tunnel syndrome on the 17th to see if the problem with my left shoulder is pinched nerves and the hand pain is because of my neck. Already knew I had problems at C4/C5/C6 from troubles I had years ago. Go see the SSDI doctor tomorrow. Good chance I will wind up on disability permanently with all the various musculoskeletal things I have going on. Uncle Arthritis isn’t being very nice to me
E8DE6203-8BF0-48E7-B167-9A3DEE77A04D.jpeg
 
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Old_Paint

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Looks like a nice Noah's Ark there my friend. (y) (y)
Feels nearly that big standing in it. Didn't think 24 x 35 was all that large, but throw in 10 foot eave height (bottom of the trusses from the slab), and it feels huge with a top on it, even if it is just a tarp for now. But, huge is good. The missus is getting pretty excited about it, because she knows the next project is her kitchen, and now I'll have a place to store materials and work on it even in bad weather. I have a WIDE stair going up to my deck with 4 stringers (two cut between two solid) that I could probably climb with the Kubota, so easy access to the back door which is right next to the kitchen. That'll make bringing in larger cabinet assemblies a little easier. Just have to cross the yard and climb one flight of stairs(14 steps). My rear deck is at least 10 feet high, if not 12 at the outer edges. Like everything else that I do, it's overbuilt. I don't like moving decks.

Decided to postpone picking up the roofing until tomorrow. I may do a little more electrical work when I get back from the doc, but more likely will spread some triazicide to run off some of the gnats and skeeters all this rain is bringing. Hate to put it down with the risk of it washing away, but the gnats are intolerable. They get behind my safety glasses and then in my eyes when I'm doing yard work or working on the shed. Helps with the noseeums too.

I used a motion sensing switch for the lights. For now, I have it programmed for manual on, Auto Off, which guarantees I won't leave 'em on. I may change that later to Auto-ON/Auto-OFF with Daylight override, similar to the flood lights I have on the house. It should be dark enough with the roll-ups closed to still work in the daytime. I'm more concerned about something obstructing the view and it turning off the lights while I'm working though. Guess I'll have to stand up and wave at my invisible friend every now and then. Still gotta wire the outlets. Gonna run two circuits with 12/3 wire rather than pulling in two separate cables. Gotta lotta holes to drill in the studs, and may not have quite enough wire. I had plenty 14/2 for the overhead lighting stuff. Old inventory just saved me nearly $250 for the wiring. It's UB, but I don't see that being a problem since the insulation is better than Romex. The outlets are getting AWG 12 simply because I don't like AWG 14 for power tools. Again, that thing about using a 20 lb sledge hammer for a flyswatter. Got a few tools that will be getting upgrades/upsizes, so want plenty ampacity to run them.

The plan is to move the breaker panel I installed in the old shed and just wire-nut a temporary feed from the current location to the new shed. Gonna salvage the materials from the old shed and have already told the inspector that. He was completely cool with it. Already dug up the permanent feed and moved it to build the Taj MaTractor, now need to dig it up again and put it in the conduit. That has to be done AFTER the inspection because the feed cannot be a permanent connection on final inspection. Figure out that logic if you can. I've had to have a LOT of electrical installations installed as an electrical engineer, and NEVER has it been before final connections were completed.

Ennyhoo, hopefully roof on and wired by next Monday, and ready for final inspection. He's only interested in the framing and wiring, but I gotta protect the trusses from any more soakings. Probably should have used exterior grade plywood for the gussets, and would have had I known the monsoons were gonna crank back up. Probably would have been about the same as the extra cost for that enormous tarp (30x50). This is usuallly our driest time of year, so you can figure out why I timed the construction when I did.
 

Chuck Woolery

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Nice build, you're a lot like me in that you save stuff from other projects to build new stuff.

You should re-use the aluminum siding from the old shed on the walls inside your new shed. Might look nice as a wainscotting.

Or if you plan to do some metal working in there it's nice to have something fire proof on the walls where you grind and cut metal. I was in a similar situation in a small workshed I just built. I lined the walls with plywood strips I got from a custom concrete company that used them a forms. I was worried that the sparks from metal working would catch either the plywood on fire, or get between the cracks and catch the paper face of the insulation on fire. Luckily I had some oddball metal roofing that I was kicking around and almost threw out. So I cut it down and lined the back of my workbench with it to catch the sparks.
 

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Old_Paint

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Nice build, you're a lot like me in that you save stuff from other projects to build new stuff.

You should re-use the aluminum siding from the old shed on the walls inside your new shed. Might look nice as a wainscotting.

Or if you plan to do some metal working in there it's nice to have something fire proof on the walls where you grind and cut metal. I was in a similar situation in a small workshed I just built. I lined the walls with plywood strips I got from a custom concrete company that used them a forms. I was worried that the sparks from metal working would catch either the plywood on fire, or get between the cracks and catch the paper face of the insulation on fire. Luckily I had some oddball metal roofing that I was kicking around and almost threw out. So I cut it down and lined the back of my workbench with it to catch the sparks.
That’s actually a brilliant idea. Would help insulate a little bit by creating air pockets and reflecting heat when I put the wood stove in. Gonna have foam underlayment with vinyl siding outside, so don’t anticipate horrible conditions inside. Have 3/4 inch foam panels under the siding on the old shed that I can repurpose as well. Some will find its way to my home brew hobby as well so I can make a lagering chamber to expand my brewing skills. Just hope the shed builder didn’t glue the panels to the studs. Don’t need a lot of heat here, but concrete floors can suck a lot of body heat out of an old man like me. I ain’t as tough as I once was, but I’m as tough once as I ever was. Was just gonna scrap the siding at the local recycling center and use the old flooring for custom peg/tool boards and make lean-tos out back to store fire wood as I clean the lot. I think I’ll put the wainscoting at least 6 feet high around a welding area(probably the center bay) and start collecting old pallets for siding like you have too. Nice looking work, btw. I like the appearance of the rough boards inside. I like the idea of roughing the inside a bit while keeping the polish on the outside.

I married an Aussie gal, and if there’s anything I like about Aussie culture, it’s the fact that if they throw something away, it was used up beyond any further use. Those folks are thrifty. I helped my BIL build a veranda (called a porch in Alabama) on my second trip to Oz with 100% reclaimed materials. Doesn’t hurt that I grew up so poor I couldn’t even pay attention. If we couldn’t grow it, catch it, or steal it, we didn’t have it. I was brought up to be honest, so the third method was never an option. I learned recycling long before recycling was cool. I doubt I have more than 1 or 2 percent waste so far.
One immediate problem with welding will be equipment. I have a flux core welder that I either ventilate, or let it kill me. I don’t like the latter option. I see a welding vent in my future.
 

Chuck Woolery

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Jun 4, 2021
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but concrete floors can suck a lot of body heat out of an old man like me.
I have bad knees and feet so when I'm working on the concrete I get pretty sore. At my last house I reused the laminate floor (the easy wood looking click together stuff) from our kitchen remodel and laid out an area over the concrete in my garage to work on, helped a ton! I also didn't have enough of the special underlayment to use with it, so I just used tar paper to keep the moisture from the concrete from warping it. The laminate was a softer and warmer surface to sit/lay down on while working on something, also helped to cushion a little while standing. Only downside is the flooring doesn't like to get be soaked in water or fluids, but the upside is it's cheap to replace and can sometimes be had for free. I did the whole floor in my workshed with it, only cost me $150 though it's only 325 square feet. You could always lay out an area with the old flooring from your existing shed as a work surface, just put tar paper under it so the moisture doesn't bother it.

I have a flux core welder that I either ventilate, or let it kill me. I don’t like the latter option. I see a welding vent in my future.
You can always make a small welding booth with sides on it and then use a bathroom fan to ventilate it. Anything is better than nothing and bathroom fans are cheap and already set up to ventilate somewhere else. Run the duct for it to a vent in your soffit to get the fumes out, that's what I'm going to do next in my workshop, just didn't get the chance to run the wiring and duct yet and it's too hot in the attic for me to crawl up there now.

Nice looking work, btw. I like the appearance of the rough boards inside.
Thanks. I actually got really lucky with these boards. They were forms from a custom concrete company close to work. They would cut the forms out of 5/8" plywood and then let them and the scraps sit outside stacked on a pallet for years. They were moving locations so they sold off a bunch of stuff. I got 4 or 5 pallets of these plywood strips for $20 a pallet. 95% of the strips were 8 feet long and each pallet was stacked 4 feet deep and 4 feet high. Had no use for it at the time, but knew I'd use it as wallboard somewhere. I saved the ones that were consistent width to use in our garage so it looks like shiplap.
 

Old_Paint

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I have bad knees and feet so when I'm working on the concrete I get pretty sore. At my last house I reused the laminate floor (the easy wood looking click together stuff) from our kitchen remodel and laid out an area over the concrete in my garage to work on, helped a ton! I also didn't have enough of the special underlayment to use with it, so I just used tar paper to keep the moisture from the concrete from warping it. The laminate was a softer and warmer surface to sit/lay down on while working on something, also helped to cushion a little while standing. Only downside is the flooring doesn't like to get be soaked in water or fluids, but the upside is it's cheap to replace and can sometimes be had for free. I did the whole floor in my workshed with it, only cost me $150 though it's only 325 square feet. You could always lay out an area with the old flooring from your existing shed as a work surface, just put tar paper under it so the moisture doesn't bother it.
I put a moisture barrier (plastic sheeting) under the slab. If there's anything I've learned about moisture barriers in the past couple weeks, it's that they work both ways. Thus the squeegee purchase. I've pushed at least 1000 gallons of water off my slab in the past week alone. We've had a lot of rain, and there's no end in sight. The Noah's Ark comment may be closer to the truth than I really want to think. I'll keep the laminate idea in mind. Got plenty asphalt felt. Bought a roll to put a moisture barrier between the bottom plate and the slab, but in order for that to work, I gotta stop the rain from coming in. Picked up the roofing materials today. I need to put the final tweaking on the squaring and plumbing of the frame, as well as put up the PVC facia, then I can start on the roof. Only 24 sheets to install, but can't do that when it's pouring down rain and lightning is popping everywhere. I put a blue tarp on it to keep the trusses I made from coming apart. The OSB and plywood I used to make the gussets showed a bit too much water absorption. I wasn't a happy camper when I saw that. I think it'll still pass inspection, but I should have put the tarp on it a lot sooner than I did. It only took one day of rain to do the damage. I have no interest in taking those trusses back down to repair them. I've been struggling to progress with it the last couple days because of rain. But, I did manage to get the lighting and outlet circuits completed. Hoping to start putting the roof on this weekend, weather permitting. I still need about 25 more sheets of sheathing to put on the sides. I may just bite the bullet and cover that with asphalt felt to keep it dry until I can get the underlayment and vinyl siding on it. It ain't fun fighting battles with Mother Nature. I don't want to spend the extra for marine grade plywood to keep it from coming apart. I don't ever remember seeing this much rain in June before. We had 6.5 inches in ONE DAY last week. There must have been at least 4 inches yesterday. There's no question that I'll have to install gutters to control the erosion around this thing.

You can always make a small welding booth with sides on it and then use a bathroom fan to ventilate it. Anything is better than nothing and bathroom fans are cheap and already set up to ventilate somewhere else. Run the duct for it to a vent in your soffit to get the fumes out, that's what I'm going to do next in my workshop, just didn't get the chance to run the wiring and duct yet and it's too hot in the attic for me to crawl up there now.
I already have a small squirrel cage fan that I think was a booster fan for a forced draft furnace. Fans are pretty easy for me to get hold of. Got a couple ideas/options I'm kicking around for getting rid of welding fumes. For now, just have to make sure I never weld with the doors closed.

This build has been quite the experience for me. Now I know why builders get paid the big bucks. Some of it would probably be a little easier if I had higher quality tools with more capabilities, but I can't see spending that kind of money for tool items that I may never use again. I have no intention of ever doing this for a living.
 

Old_Paint

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Decided to get a photo of the Taj MaTractor lit up at night. I'm affecting traffic on the nearby road. This thing is BRIGHT.
IMG_2748[1].JPG
 
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Chuck Woolery

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I don't ever remember seeing this much rain in June before. We had 6.5 inches in ONE DAY last week. There must have been at least 4 inches yesterday. There's no question that I'll have to install gutters to control the erosion around this thing.
Send some up my way to WI, we're really dry here now and need rain bad.....though that just brings in the Mosquitos.


I still need about 25 more sheets of sheathing to put on the sides.
Not sure about the codes by you, but we've built houses before with this stuff for wall sheathing. I'm tempted to go this route on my shed build this summer just to help save cost. We hated using it because it just seemed silly to use when OSB was just as cheap. Biggest thing when using this type of stuff (and/or the insulation board alternative) is you have to inlay diagonal bracing in the corners to create the stiffness for the wall. That was the biggest pain setting that stuff in. Sometimes we cheated and used OSB on the corners and then this stuff or insulation board for the rest of it. My old house was sided with this stuff and it was built in '79 and still standing like me.



I already have a small squirrel cage fan that I think was a booster fan for a forced draft furnace. Fans are pretty easy for me to get hold of. Got a couple ideas/options I'm kicking around for getting rid of welding fumes. For now, just have to make sure I never weld with the doors closed.
Great idea! And likely more airflow than a bathroom fart fan.
 

Old_Paint

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Another day with my bestest helper (my wife) and another wall covered with sheathing and felt. SIL decided to show up after lunch with half the sheathing up, but was still a big help getting the rest of the sheathing done and felt put up. The missus don’t climb. She does everything she can physically do for me, but climbing ain’t part of the package.

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West end looking east. Front and east walls done. Decided to do the worst two walls first.
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South side looking out the bay doors
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Standing in the yard looking in the front.
Will knock out the east wall tomorrow and move the distribution panel from the old shed to the new on and temp in the power from the old shed. Planning on having the inspector out next week for final.
 
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Old_Paint

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Send some up my way to WI, we're really dry here now and need rain bad.....though that just brings in the Mosquitos.
Some of the skeeters around here have tail numbers and appear to be armed with sidewinder missiles. The scorpions are even trying to find a place to get outta the rain here. Had one about an inch and a half long come visit me while I was framing the east wall
Not sure about the codes by you, but we've built houses before with this stuff for wall sheathing. I'm tempted to go this route on my shed build this summer just to help save cost. We hated using it because it just seemed silly to use when OSB was just as cheap. Biggest thing when using this type of stuff (and/or the insulation board alternative) is you have to inlay diagonal bracing in the corners to create the stiffness for the wall. That was the biggest pain setting that stuff in. Sometimes we cheated and used OSB on the corners and then this stuff or insulation board for the rest of it. My old house was sided with this stuff and it was built in '79 and still standing like me.
OSB and 3/8 plywood sheathing is about the same price right now. Hard to figure that out considering OSB is mostly the waste product of making plywood. I’m pretty frugal with my lumber purchases. Until today, I don’t think I had more than 1% waste. But I blew up that statistic because I screwed up cutting a sheet of plywood and now have to figure out how to use it elsewhere. Probably some doors for some workbenches I already have to keep some of the dust outta less frequently used tools
Great idea! And likely more airflow than a bathroom fart fan.
Yeah, I want to put temperature controlled ventilation fans in the gables to help cool the shed some. But I don’t want to make welding fume remove part of the job for those.