need something tougher than UHMW

hockeystewey

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Hey guys,
need some advice, I made some skid shoes for my snow pusher out of UHMW and they worked great, except I wore them out already. Does anyone have a recommendation of a material I can use to make skid shoes from that will last longer, but u can still machine too?

thanks for the help guys!!
 

SidecarFlip

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Same stuff John Deere and CNH uses on their combine headers...HDPE sheet. 1/4" thick or better. I myself use it in the skids on my disc mower, beats hardfacing and it renewable.
 

eipo

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I used 1" HDPE cut and heated/bent to fit. Actually had the pusher built around the idea of using 1" HDPE for the skids.

UHMWPE is pretty tough stuff as it had the added benefit of being self lubricating... What surface are you using it on and are you using down pressure or letting the pusher float?
 

hockeystewey

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I used 1" HDPE cut and heated/bent to fit. Actually had the pusher built around the idea of using 1" HDPE for the skids.

UHMWPE is pretty tough stuff as it had the added benefit of being self lubricating... What surface are you using it on and are you using down pressure or letting the pusher float?
its asphalt surface, rough asphalt apparently. I use my snow pusher in float position 99% of the time. I had 1/4" shoes on there and they are disintegrated in prob less than 5 hrs plow time
 

MadMax31

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My snow pusher has 1/2 inch HDPE skids on it. Look good after 3 uses ( 2 hours ) but I have gravel, probably not as abrasive as rough asphalt. That stuff is vulcanized cheese grater material...
 

Russell King

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Look at Delrin
It may be tougher


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

200mph

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What is the surface area in contact with the surface as it sits in float? Some skid shoes may not be parallel to surface and thus have higher contact pressures.

UHMWPE generally has better wear properties on rough surfaces than homopolymer acetal (Delrin). I'd stick with UHMWPE and perhaps alter the contact patch to minimize the contact pressure. ie: Make shoes wider

Maybe wheels would be a better choice. :D

Any pictures of what the shoes look like?


UHMW = UHMWPE (Ultra High Molecular Weight PolyEthylene)
 

dlsmith

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Gee, how about steel shoes? Those should last a lot longer than any kind of plastic.
If you're using them on asphalt or concrete, no kind of plastic is going to last very long.
 

Yooper

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Any thing you use other than wheels will eventually wear out. More contact surface is the answer unless you opt for wheels. And if you go with wheels make sure they have bearings and are not the friction type.
 

D2Cat

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You mention, "...that will last longer, but u can still machine too?"

Why can't you use stainless steel? Make some pads, any size you want, bend the front edge up at a 30 deg. angle so it doesn't snag on materials. Weld that to a round shaft as req'd, and mount just as you have now. A 1/4" piece of SS will last quite a while. I've made them for 8' truck plow, and they work fine.
 

hockeystewey

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guess I should clarify a bit, I put the UHMW shoes I made on under the metal shoes that came with the pusher to reduce marking on my driveway. It still has the steel shoes on it. this isnt the best pick of it, but the only one I found.
 

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BAP

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One thing to check for when using plastic is to check the plastic to make sure it is rated for abrasion resistance.
 

mikester

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UHMW is probably better than HDPE for what you are doing, definitely better than delrin. Delrin is a good plastic if you are machining parts, UHMW is a good bearing material because its tough and good for metal on metal bearings.

If you need abrasion wear resistance go with something like AR300 steel.

You can choose either 1.Easy to machine Or 2. wear resistant. You cant have both.
 
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Yooper

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That sure looks like an adequate surface. I think it is just a matter of finding the right type of plastic. Sorry, but my experience with plastics is very limited.
 

ccoon520

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Here is a website that lists some options as well as their properties:
https://www.osborneindustries.com/news/low-friction-abrasion-resistant-plastics/

My first question is: Is it a concrete driveway or Asphalt? I ask because Asphalt is very soft (a MOHS between 1 & 2) meaning that even soft metals like brass (MOHS 3-4) are harder than it. Concrete however has a MOHS of around 5 meaning you have a wider breadth of options when looking at wear materials.

Maybe look into waxing the bottom of the UHMW to give it a film between it and the driveway?

Or you could try getting something like AR400 and rounding the edges as cleanly as possible so there is not an edge to dig into the driveway to leave marks. The third option (if your driveway is concrete) is a very soft alloy that is softer than your driveway so instead of gouging the driveway it gouges the metal but I do not know what the cost of this kind of solution would be.

The only other thing I can think of is getting some OBS or plywood sand it as smooth as possible, lacquer or poly it and then wax over the finish. You can then repeat the finishing process as needed on the bottom of the wood for cheap and if you toast it then thin plywood is pretty dirt cheap too.

EDIT: Also here is a link to a table for hardness numbers if it helps: https://www.praterindustries.com/wp-content/uploads/hardness-table.pdf
 
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skeets

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On my old Myers plow I wore the shoes out, and a guy made me up a set, I dont know what he used but by gawd was that stuff hard!!! I plowed a bunch of church lots and driveways with my Jeep truck, 2 years and the OEM shoes were toast, I wonder if he used a cutter blade off a dozer :confused:
 

SidecarFlip

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I use steel skids that I weld with hard surface rod. Lasts a long time.
Not sure what u can do about leaving skid marks
What I do, Lincoln Abrasoweld SMAW rod is hard to beat for wear resistance.
 

SidecarFlip

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Thinking about it, you could put wide hard rubber wheels on the bottom.
 

greenacresnorth

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What I do, Lincoln Abrasoweld SMAW rod is hard to beat for wear resistance.
Stoody Stoodite 31, best hard facing rod I have ever seen, lays on nice and flat, holds up to limerock, and granite extremely well. I hardfaced the bottom of the wear edge on my bucket and sides/bottom on hoe bucket.... 3 years and no appreciable wear.