SVL95-2S Running Hot with Drum Mulcher (solved)

CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2S, KX-040, M110GX, M5400, ZD331
Nov 19, 2018
14
3
3
Tuskegee, AL
I am going to take the radiator off and take it to a repair shop to make sure any bent fins are corrected. Any tips on removing it? I imagine a fair amount of hydraulic oil will be lost when I disconnect the hoses so hoping I can capture and reuse most of it. thanks
 

Dieseldonato

Well-known member

Equipment
B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
718
420
63
Pa
A SVL95 is the largest SS that Kubota makes. The lostness 71" mulcher was designed for this SS (95hp turbo). this is per Loftness and Kubota
That unfortunately doesn't answer the question.
 

Chris W

New member

Equipment
SVL95-2S
May 16, 2022
8
0
1
Texas
I've been using the new radiator for about 3 or 4 weeks and I keep the rpms at 2250. This has fixed my overheating problems. I blow it out twice a day. I also live in Texas and the last two weeks it's been 100° + and it's performed great. Hope this helps guys.
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
61
7
8
Florence, Alabama
I am going to take the radiator off and take it to a repair shop to make sure any bent fins are corrected. Any tips on removing it? I imagine a fair amount of hydraulic oil will be lost when I disconnect the hoses so hoping I can capture and reuse most of it. thanks
I lost about a quart of both antifreeze and hydraulic fluid. There is an antifreeze drain hose inside the left rear inspection plate. It is attached to the plate. Loosen to bottom two bolts and remove the top two bolts. Slide the cover upwards. Drain the fluid in a container first. I pulled my outside so I just let the fluid pour in the dirt. The radiator is very heavy, I’m guessing 70lb. Mine won’t be ready until Monday (27th).
I've been using the new radiator for about 3 or 4 weeks and I keep the rpms at 2250. This has fixed my overheating problems. I blow it out twice a day. I also live in Texas and the last two weeks it's been 100° + and it's performed great. Hope this helps guys.
I’m glad it’s working out for you. I ran mine at 3/4 throttle but didn’t see a difference. Mine was getting worse over time, that’s why I decided to pull the radiator and have it tested. I’m also thinking about having a custom radiator made, although I have to put more thought into it. Thanks for posting.
Mike
 

CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2S, KX-040, M110GX, M5400, ZD331
Nov 19, 2018
14
3
3
Tuskegee, AL
I've been using the new radiator for about 3 or 4 weeks and I keep the rpms at 2250. This has fixed my overheating problems. I blow it out twice a day. I also live in Texas and the last two weeks it's been 100° + and it's performed great. Hope this helps guys.
That's good news. Do you have an external Hydraulic Radiator?
 

CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2S, KX-040, M110GX, M5400, ZD331
Nov 19, 2018
14
3
3
Tuskegee, AL
I lost about a quart of both antifreeze and hydraulic fluid. There is an antifreeze drain hose inside the left rear inspection plate. It is attached to the plate. Loosen to bottom two bolts and remove the top two bolts. Slide the cover upwards. Drain the fluid in a container first. I pulled my outside so I just let the fluid pour in the dirt. The radiator is very heavy, I’m guessing 70lb. Mine won’t be ready until Monday (27th).

I’m glad it’s working out for you. I ran mine at 3/4 throttle but didn’t see a difference. Mine was getting worse over time, that’s why I decided to pull the radiator and have it tested. I’m also thinking about having a custom radiator made, although I have to put more thought into it. Thanks for posting.
Mike
Thanks Mike! Hoping to salvage as much of that liquid gold as possible! I do see some bent fins, especially around the edges so going to take it to a radiator shop and let them straighten them out and really clean it. If that doesn't work looking at buying and external cooler. Kubota is backordered since January so looking at the FAE and LOFTIS alternatives but they are really pricey.
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
61
7
8
Florence, Alabama
Thanks Mike! Hoping to salvage as much of that liquid gold as possible! I do see some bent fins, especially around the edges so going to take it to a radiator shop and let them straighten them out and really clean it. If that doesn't work looking at buying and external cooler. Kubota is backordered since January so looking at the FAE and LOFTIS alternatives but they are really pricey.
The Loftness external cooler is nearly $10k. I don’t believe mine isn’t helping to keep the machine cool at all. On Tuesday, I’m going to bypass my external cooler to assure that external cooler is not causing the overheating.
 

CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2S, KX-040, M110GX, M5400, ZD331
Nov 19, 2018
14
3
3
Tuskegee, AL
The Loftness external cooler is nearly $10k. I don’t believe mine isn’t helping to keep the machine cool at all. On Tuesday, I’m going to bypass my external cooler to assure that external cooler is not causing the overheating.
Wow that's good to know. That is a lot of wasted money if it doesn't solve the problem. I will be very interested in what you find out as I was literally discussing this with the Loftness and Kubota reps. Of course they say it will "fix" the problem.............
 

Jchonline

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
Kubota L6060, KX040-4, M7060, RTV X1100C, M62 (sold)
Oct 28, 2018
1,105
405
83
Red Feather Lakes, CO
I wonder if the SVL-97 has the issue? Can Kubota test your mulcher head on one of theirs on a lot?
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
61
7
8
Florence, Alabama
My brother has a 97 with the Kubota external cooler I am going to try soon with my mulcher. Will post the results.
I’m trying to find a rental unit to test the head. I’ve narrowed it down to; when the mulcher runs, it puts a load on the engine. The load caused the heat buildup. Not sure if something is wrong with the engine that’s causing loss of torque, or if the hydraulic’s are causing a load on the engine. I’m taking the machine back to Kubota on July 3.
Thanks for the post.
 

RBsingl

Active member

Equipment
Kubota F 2690 72" rear discharge deck, Deere 955
Jul 1, 2022
252
237
43
Central IL
My brother has a 97 with the Kubota external cooler I am going to try soon with my mulcher. Will post the results.
An external engine oil cooler can make a huge difference with an engine cooling system that almost has enough capacity so hopefully that solves the problem. If practical, instead of putting it in the existing cooling stack instead mount it with an electric fan where it gets its own airflow and exhaust without stealing from the stock cooling stack.

Another less expensive option than a larger/custom radiator solution is making sure that the fan shroud is properly doing its job (sometimes it is necessary to use some type of weather stripping to ensure that the airflow is through the heat exchanger instead of part of the flow choosing the path of least resistance between the shroud and the radiator).

With stationary equipment, you may also want to see if there is a replacement fan blade assembly that moves more air than the OEM fan. But don't fall for the electric hype, it takes a lot of power to move a lot of air and in general electric fans are best suited for cars with light to intermittent moderate loading and not equipment that is running continuously at rated power where the mechanical fan is still king. In these setups, electric is fine for auxiliary coolers but not as a replacement for the primary cooling system.

Rodger
 
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CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2S, KX-040, M110GX, M5400, ZD331
Nov 19, 2018
14
3
3
Tuskegee, AL

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
61
7
8
Florence, Alabama
An external engine oil cooler can make a huge difference with an engine cooling system that almost has enough capacity so hopefully that solves the problem. If practical, instead of putting it in the existing cooling stack instead mount it with an electric fan where it gets its own airflow and exhaust without stealing from the stock cooling stack.

Another less expensive option than a larger/custom radiator solution is making sure that the fan shroud is properly doing its job (sometimes it is necessary to use some type of weather stripping to ensure that the airflow is through the heat exchanger instead of part of the flow choosing the path of least resistance between the shroud and the radiator).

With stationary equipment, you may also want to see if there is a replacement fan blade assembly that moves more air than the OEM fan. But don't fall for the electric hype, it takes a lot of power to move a lot of air and in general electric fans are best suited for cars with light to intermittent moderate loading and not equipment that is running continuously at rated power where the mechanical fan is still king. In these setups, electric is fine for auxiliary coolers but not as a replacement for the primary cooling system.

Rodger
Rodger, Thanks for the input. Stuff such as this is good to know. I have a Loftness external cooler on my SCL95. The cooler keeps the hydraulic fluid at a consistent 127-160 degrees when ambient temp is 95+ degrees. When checking the radiators with a laser thermometer, the right side of the radiator is 235-240, the left side is 160-165. If anything, my hydraulic fluid is keeping my coolant cooler. I’m convinced the load the mulcher is putting on the machines engine is causing the problem, but I’m not sure what the fix is. Ideas?
 

RBsingl

Active member

Equipment
Kubota F 2690 72" rear discharge deck, Deere 955
Jul 1, 2022
252
237
43
Central IL
Rodger, Thanks for the input. Stuff such as this is good to know. I have a Loftness external cooler on my SCL95. The cooler keeps the hydraulic fluid at a consistent 127-160 degrees when ambient temp is 95+ degrees. When checking the radiators with a laser thermometer, the right side of the radiator is 235-240, the left side is 160-165. If anything, my hydraulic fluid is keeping my coolant cooler. I’m convinced the load the mulcher is putting on the machines engine is causing the problem, but I’m not sure what the fix is. Ideas?
A few random thoughts:

1. Is the mulcher just too much load for that engine? I wonder what Kubota's acceptable upper limit for EGT is prior to the turbo and what your EGT is running under this load.

2. Is the coolant pump/cooling system flowing as well as it should? With a 70-80 degree drop across the radiator, it is rejecting plenty of heat but the outlet flow to the radiator is too hot. If something is restricting the flow (thermostat not fully open) or if the pump blades have eroded (it happens to some engines with coolant that has gotten out of PH balance) then flow isn't what it ought to be. If coolant flow is the issue, then a radiator with more surface area but not much greater flow won't help that much and an auxiliary radiator in series with the main radiator could even make it worse.

3. Anything that restricts the exhaust more than design will create overheat in a hurry (deposit fouled muffler, distorted/crimped exhaust pipe).

4. What type of engine oil cooler is stock in this setup? If it is a oil to engine coolant exchanger, then it contributes significantly to the coolant temperature. Running this high of a coolant temperature would make me really want to know what the oil temperature is doing.

5. An additional oil cooler and/or a high flow radiator with more surface area could probably control the operating temperature. But if the stock cooling system is working as intended then you may find the next weak link (i.e. EGT leading to damage) if you overcome the cooling issue.

Good luck with this!

Rodger
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
61
7
8
Florence, Alabama
A few random thoughts:

1. Is the mulcher just too much load for that engine? I wonder what Kubota's acceptable upper limit for EGT is prior to the turbo and what your EGT is running under this load.

2. Is the coolant pump/cooling system flowing as well as it should? With a 70-80 degree drop across the radiator, it is rejecting plenty of heat but the outlet flow to the radiator is too hot. If something is restricting the flow (thermostat not fully open) or if the pump blades have eroded (it happens to some engines with coolant that has gotten out of PH balance) then flow isn't what it ought to be. If coolant flow is the issue, then a radiator with more surface area but not much greater flow won't help that much and an auxiliary radiator in series with the main radiator could even make it worse.

3. Anything that restricts the exhaust more than design will create overheat in a hurry (deposit fouled muffler, distorted/crimped exhaust pipe).

4. What type of engine oil cooler is stock in this setup? If it is a oil to engine coolant exchanger, then it contributes significantly to the coolant temperature. Running this high of a coolant temperature would make me really want to know what the oil temperature is doing.

5. An additional oil cooler and/or a high flow radiator with more surface area could probably control the operating temperature. But if the stock cooling system is working as intended then you may find the next weak link (i.e. EGT leading to damage) if you overcome the cooling issue.

Good luck with this!

Rodger
Hi Rodger, thanks for the good input. I’m nit sure what the EGT temp is supposed to be before and after the turbo although, one Kubota dealer said the checked it and checked the turbo oil seal for leaks. They said Jorge were okay.
A few random thoughts:

1. Is the mulcher just too much load for that engine? I wonder what Kubota's acceptable upper limit for EGT is prior to the turbo and what your EGT is running under this load.

2. Is the coolant pump/cooling system flowing as well as it should? With a 70-80 degree drop across the radiator, it is rejecting plenty of heat but the outlet flow to the radiator is too hot. If something is restricting the flow (thermostat not fully open) or if the pump blades have eroded (it happens to some engines with coolant that has gotten out of PH balance) then flow isn't what it ought to be. If coolant flow is the issue, then a radiator with more surface area but not much greater flow won't help that much and an auxiliary radiator in series with the main radiator could even make it worse.

3. Anything that restricts the exhaust more than design will create overheat in a hurry (deposit fouled muffler, distorted/crimped exhaust pipe).

4. What type of engine oil cooler is stock in this setup? If it is a oil to engine coolant exchanger, then it contributes significantly to the coolant temperature. Running this high of a coolant temperature would make me really want to know what the oil temperature is doing.

5. An additional oil cooler and/or a high flow radiator with more surface area could probably control the operating temperature. But if the stock cooling system is working as intended then you may find the next weak link (i.e. EGT leading to damage) if you overcome the cooling issue.

Good luck with this!

Rodger
Rodger, Thanks for the great input.
1. One of the dealers noted that they checked the EGT on both sides of the turbo. They also said they checked the turbo oil seal, all three were okay. With this said. I'm not sure what the EGT temp is supposed to be.

2. Thermostat was replaced. Ive checked the flow inside the radiator and noted that after the thermostat opens, there is plenty of flow. aLthough I don't know how to measure the flow of the water pump. the machine only has 1800 hours on it. I would really be disappointed in Kubota if the water pump blades were depleted after 1800 hours. I'll order a gasket and pull the pump just to be sure.

3.Exhaust restriction: I'm totally with you on this. I mulched two days and the machine use 3-1/4 gallons of DPT fluid (wow). I've asked them to change the DPF system, so next week when the dealer has it, they are going to check the DPF system for blockage.

4. Great insight: No oil cooler on the machine. It does not have temp gage for the oil. I did look into one. A multi-temp gage is $1000.0 and checks four positions. I'm considering the purchase.

5. I'm not sure why I would need a different radiator and an oil cooler if there are plenty of machines out there that are not overheating running the same head. Last week, I checked with a radiator manufacturing shop to see if they could make a radiator. They said they wouldn't know where to start because the operation conditions of the machine are unknown.
Ill keep you posted.
Thanks
 

RBsingl

Active member

Equipment
Kubota F 2690 72" rear discharge deck, Deere 955
Jul 1, 2022
252
237
43
Central IL
Mike,

1. I hope the dealer checked EGT under the load level that is causing the overheat condition because that is when it should be the worst. It probably is OK but depending upon the system design, it is something to worry about if the cooling system is being stressed.

2. The reason I question flow is you have a much higher than typical temperature differential between your radiator hot in and cool out sides; some of that is due to the very hot temperature of the coolant coming in from the engine compared to the air temperature but insufficient flow allows more coolant heat gain in the engine and more heat rejection in the radiator.

3. With Tier IV emissions, your exhaust after-treatment includes a DPF (diesel particulate filter) which traps soot that is effectively incinerated during regeneration cycles and a selective catalyst that uses DEF (diesel exhaust fluid). Nitrogen oxide is one of the prime concerns with a diesel engine and the ammonia from DEF works with the selective catalyst to convert Nox to nitrogen and water.

Different engine controllers use different algorithms in conjunction with the downstream "sniffers" but in general, fuel consumption and DEF consumption track very closely so the more fuel that you use the more DEF that will be consumed. A degraded catalyst, problems with the DEF injector or fluid quality, or a fault with the exhaust sensor can cause DEF consumption to change.

If the DPF isn't regenerating properly or has reached the point where it is becoming loaded with particulate that can't be incinerated then the back pressure will increase but at that point it should be trying to constantly regen and the ECM should set codes. If the sensors that measure drop across the DPF are faulty, then the actual pressure drop across the particulate filter is higher than being reported with a resultant increase in exhaust back pressure.

I don't mind the expense and hassle of DEF because it is one of the reasons many "final Tier IV" compliant engines have slightly better fuel efficiency than prior revisions. Being able to effectively treat NOx in the exhaust stream means the engine can be allowed to produce more in operation allowing the high peak combustion pressure that is great for power and efficiency but which prolifically generates NOx.

DPF on the other hand is a pain adding weight and complexity and it wastes raw diesel during regeneration which is fed into the DPF in order to increase temperature and turn it into a self cleaning oven. For highway vehicles, the added weight of the filter and its necessary heat protection is a problem and the extremely hot exhaust temperature developed during regen increases potential for fire in agricultural and off road equipment. A number of years ago, EU regulators begin seriously considering particulate filters for gas powered vehicles because the high pressure direct injection method used for most modern vehicles with gas engines produces particulate matter just like diesel engines. But I think they decided that EVs are coming quickly enough to leave the gas vehicles free from particulate filters.

4. I am surprised that the machine doesn't have some sort of engine oil cooler and given the operating conditions it is something to consider. I would see what type of oil cooler is used by Kubota for that engine in other applications. An integrated oil to coolant heat exchanger is often used now because it provides a compact engine mounted package that provides very little pressure drop across the heat exchanger and also avoids the potential failure from a damaged oil feed line or externally mounted oil to air heat exchanger. But given current cooling system issues, I wouldn't want to add anything to load on the existing cooling system.

5. My knowledge of mulching is pretty much zero but is there enough material variance that your machine is seeing a different raw material input with characteristics different enough that the head is causing greater loading than typical? If not and your machine is overheating under conditions where it definitely shouldn't (same load/operating conditions/ambient temperature as other machines that operate normally).

I definitely don't like modifying to treat the symptoms rather than the root cause so if the existing cooling system is sufficient, you need to find where the failure point is in the system. As a hobby, I restore vintage ham radio gear and part of the restoration is often removing poorly added modifications over the years where someone tried to fix via modification instead of addressing the actual failure. With fairly rare exception, the original engineers got it right and later modifications often just paper over a component malfunction rather than getting to the root of the problem.

Good luck and have a happy 4th!

Rodger
 
Last edited:

lugbolt

Well-known member

Equipment
ZG127S-54
Oct 15, 2015
3,999
1,041
113
Mid, South, USA
they do have an engine oil cooler. It's a sandwich type, coolant cooled, behind the oil filter. 2 hoses going to it.
 

CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2S, KX-040, M110GX, M5400, ZD331
Nov 19, 2018
14
3
3
Tuskegee, AL
Well I bit the bullet and purchased the external oil cooler. Once that is installed will try this again. I am not confident this is going to fix the issue but the dealership is giving me zero assistance in figuring this out