Steep Trail Solution

Flienlow

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Steep trails-
I am getting mixed reviews on how to tackle my project. I am hoping to avoid too much experimentation so figured I would post here, to see if anyone has tackled this before.
Issue: Gravel washing out/eroding on Steep Trail. -Need a solution. Trail consists of Mirafi 140n Non-woven fabric with 5/8" Minus gravel over the Top.
Goal: Fix trail with a long-term solution that will work.
We use this trail primary as a path for our quad, and sometimes BX tractor. For the quad, it is very passable, but since its steep, my quad spins and makes ruts in the gravel; add seasonal rains and we have all the gravel down at the bottom of the trail.
Looking back, the fabric was probably a mistake too.
Possible Solutions:
Concrete -drive path
Asphalt Pavement -drive path
Plastic permeable Pavers such as: https://standartpark-usa.com/products/easypave-grid-grass-gravel-paving-system.
Portland Cement Mixed in with gravel to "lock it up."

Asphalt would be the most difficult to do. In fact, IHMO not feasible due to access, transport, and compacting.
Concrete remains a viable option, but would be extremely expensive when calculating the mud, pumping, forming, and finishing.
The plastic permeable pavers are on my A list right now. you can fill them with gravel, dirt, or bark for that matter. While not cheap at $2.50/ft, these would allow for water passage (in theory.)
What I dont know is if gravel will stay in the cups as the quad passes over? Filling them with dirt could pose the risk of making a slide with a nice tractor trap at the end. Not having ever used these, I simply dont know if it would be a solution or not??
Simply Mixing bags Portland cement in with the gravel. Obviously, the Cheapo Home Depot fix of the group. I have read where this has worked for some people, and where it has not worked at all. There is a not a lot of info about doing this. My fear is that I would just end up with ugly concrete crumbles and would need to start over again.
At any rate, if anyone has tackled this before I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions on that matter.
 
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BigG

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How long is the hill? Is the hill big enough to require a switchback to allow an easier pathway?

Are you able to get asphalt millings? The degree of the hill might make it a little difficult to install but it could work. Make sure to install several inches of it and compact it well. Use your gravel as a base.

Is there any way to redirect the water away from the pathway? This is key to preventing additional problems.

Do you have a concrete plant near you? I have seen the washout from the mixer trucks used as a road base after it has been dried out.

The plastic pavers look good and way cheaper than concrete. I would shop that idea some more in order to find a better deal.

Could you repurpose expanded metal catwalks? Bury them into the gravel to prevent the washout.

There is no way I would dump bags of concrete in hopes of tightening up the gravel. It will turn into a mess.

With the limited info in you question I was just sharing some ideas that jumped into my head.
 

D2Cat

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I remember seeing some pictures of your property a couple of years ago. If that is the property you're working on I suggest switch backs!!:D
 

Flienlow

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How long is the hill? Is the hill big enough to require a switchback to allow an easier pathway?

Are you able to get asphalt millings? The degree of the hill might make it a little difficult to install but it could work. Make sure to install several inches of it and compact it well. Use your gravel as a base.

Is there any way to redirect the water away from the pathway? This is key to preventing additional problems.

Do you have a concrete plant near you? I have seen the washout from the mixer trucks used as a road base after it has been dried out.

The plastic pavers look good and way cheaper than concrete. I would shop that idea some more in order to find a better deal.

Could you repurpose expanded metal catwalks? Bury them into the gravel to prevent the washout.

There is no way I would dump bags of concrete in hopes of tightening up the gravel. It will turn into a mess.

With the limited info in you question I was just sharing some ideas that jumped into my head.
We have both concrete and asphalt plants local. I am not a fan of using either as recycled material. The metal catwalks I dont think would work either. I am waiting for some more detail via email on the pavers. I would use concrete turf pavers, but they are heavy and a PIA to install.
 

sheepfarmer

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Have you considered that some trails and paths are meant for WALKING and not for driving on?
 

Flienlow

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If I could put more switchbacks in, I would have. With the slope so steep and the lot so narrow, I have the path in the only available spot which is also the most efficient. We do have a walking path as well, but this path is primarily used for my quad, and once fully completed, I highly doubt I will use it for any orange equipment in the future as I will use mainly to bring heavy things down to the lakefront. I could abandoned it and carry all the stuff, but I am unwilling, Hence I need to do something with this trail.
 

Russell King

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Please provide pictures of the area so we can see what you are dealing with.

I would suggest thinking about the switch back to make it less steep. You may have to make it so you drive forward on one leg, then back up/down the second leg. If you fit in three legs then you’re always going to be heading out the same as you started in.

Stacked rock wall to help stabilize the ramps?


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G.rid

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Google 'mechanical concrete'

I'm not sure how steep of an incline it can be used on. It looks like a promising idea for certain areas. I'm thinking on a steeper slope, bolt or tie them together, then add stakes on the uphill tires. Fill with crushed stone for extra drainage.

Pictures or description of the length and steepness will help get better advice.

Before and after pictures would be nice too, no matter how you tackle it.
 

bcp

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My driveway is about 6% slope. A load of 5/8 minus washed out in one winter. It was replaced with 1 1/4 minus about 6 years ago. All is still in place, and even better than new.

You might be able to use rock or gravel, but have to experiment to find a size/combination that will stay in place.

Bruce
 

North Idaho Wolfman

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Yea the 5/8 is too small.

You're fighting Mother Nature, and Gravity.

The cloth is fine, and required, but if it's not deep enough to get a good base over it anything is going to slide on it.

You need a good base of about 6" thick or more of 2" to 5" crushed stone as a base to keep it from just rolling around under the tires.

Yes a completely better, but much more expensive option is concrete.

Or even better yet a Funicular system! :D

www.hillsidelifts.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q95L0WhRhxA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY-4_7g2pqY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOovLq-_pbc
 

Flienlow

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Yea the 5/8 is too small.

You're fighting Mother Nature, and Gravity.

The cloth is fine, and required, but if it's not deep enough to get a good base over it anything is going to slide on it.

You need a good base of about 6" thick or more of 2" to 5" crushed stone as a base to keep it from just rolling around under the tires.

Yes a completely better, but much more expensive option is concrete.

Or even better yet a Funicular system! :D

www.hillsidelifts.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q95L0WhRhxA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY-4_7g2pqY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOovLq-_pbc
You have never priced out a hill side lift or talked to an insurance agent about insuring one have you? :D
They are big money.

I had larger stone in before. My SVL Loved it, the Quad hated it and spit the rocks down the hill. I would combine them both, but would be too afraid of of just having the same issue where the rocks get spit out.
 

Russell King

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Can you add some timber steps to help hold the gravel in place?

Think of three timbers making a U shape. Then stack them in a stair-step fashion. Anchor to the ground to stabilize each step. Add angle iron to the edge if needed to strengthen it against the quads tires. Fill with the gravel.

Will require some digging into the hillside but search on line for examples of construction.


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3bfarm

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Without seeing it it is hard to make any recommendations but I will tell you how I have done to help mine. I have a pasture road that slopes for over a 1/4 mile and then gets steep for a ways. It tends to wash so I have berms to force the water off the road and a big one at the top of the steep part. Make sure you divert the water far enough that it doesn't come back to your road. It helps but doesn't cure the problem.
 

Flienlow

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Can you add some timber steps to help hold the gravel in place?

Think of three timbers making a U shape. Then stack them in a stair-step fashion. Anchor to the ground to stabilize each step. Add angle iron to the edge if needed to strengthen it against the quads tires. Fill with the gravel.

Will require some digging into the hillside but search on line for examples of construction.


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\


This is a great Idea, but I am most certain that my Tires would dig out the uphill side of the timber and spit the gravel out.

Upon further review. seems I really have a about 3 choices.
1.Do a full concrete pour and tine finish the surface.

2. Install Pavers like this https://www.lowes.com/pd/Turfstone-...on-24-in-x-16-in-Actual-24-in-x-16-in/3764691
I had some of these that I just threw down for traction and my SVL ate them alive. I had to waste them and haven't tried since. :( I am sure the BX would not and the quad would surely not move them. But they are big & heavy to man handle.

3. The Easypave. The Reps believe this will work well for me and will work up to a 65% slope. They get great reviews, and would be very easy to cut with a hot saw on forming corners and such. These do not require a "base" and will also provide excellent drainage with the correct stone. They can be used without stone and the project can be done incrementally as I have time.
They are expensive though.

https://standartpark-usa.com/produc...8_yl8C8dlchojxUhKaZN7tiR_pSPaKjQaAiv5EALw_wcB
 

SMKK

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Yea the 5/8 is too small.

You're fighting Mother Nature, and Gravity.

The cloth is fine, and required, but if it's not deep enough to get a good base over it anything is going to slide on it.

You need a good base of about 6" thick or more of 2" to 5" crushed stone as a base to keep it from just rolling around under the tires.
I would second this - you need a good solid base of larger rock, typically 3" minus is good, but on steep inclines larger rock is helpful. Needs to be packed too, I would go with a 4-5" on the bottom and then top it with 2" minus and leave it at that. The cloth is preventing rocks from sinking into the mud and stopping dirt from coming up and blocking your drainage.
If you are spinning up the hill no matter what you are putting it is going to eventually case ruts, which will get worse with water. Maintenance of the surface, to control water and maintain a nice crown or push the water to a ditch will be necessary. Concrete, pavers etc. still need a really solid base but it wont wear that same way. You need to ensure that water is not going to wash your material out from under them as well so good drainage and management of water that his coming down the hill is essential,
 

Flienlow

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