L4060 HST filter is insanely tight

virginiavenom

Member
Jan 30, 2015
373
9
18
Sherman, TX
hey guys, I'm trying to change my HST filter on my L4060 open station (the one with the notches on the filter, looks like for a spanner wrench or the like) I can't get this thing to move for the life of me. I bled off all the hydraulics on it and it still won't budge. I noticed the notches on it and wonder if there is a special tool required for removal or that makes it easier. I've done oil changes on cars and trucks and have never had this much trouble getting one to spin off. I've got a pair of the channel lock style oil filter wrenches and it won't budge it.

recommendations? is there actually a tool I need?
 
Oct 8, 2014
623
4
16
oregon
Yup, they make a wrench for that. It's not really a wrench but when you see it you'll understand. You could get a punch in there and hammer away. Not fun but I've done it.
 

virginiavenom

Member
Jan 30, 2015
373
9
18
Sherman, TX
yeah, I've done that and a screwdriver through an old filter before. but you really shouldn't have to. any idea what the tool is called, or size and where to get it?
 

rjcorazza

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L4060 HSTC Loader, ZD326, ZD331
Mar 9, 2016
763
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Hyattstown, MD
I have done well with a metal strap type oil filter wrench. For tight filters I have roughed up the filter with sandpaper to get better grip. My next step has been a chain wrench, which is as far as I've had to go. With the hydraulic filter having the slots at the base, I would likely try a punch or screwdriver and hammer but I've never had to try it.
 

Tooljunkie

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May 13, 2014
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I have chiseled oil filters off. Generally its due to not lubricating seal. With oil. Dont use grease. Oil only. If you have to chisel, use care not to nick sealing surface.
 

85Hokie

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yeah, I've done that and a screwdriver through an old filter before. but you really shouldn't have to. any idea what the tool is called, or size and where to get it?
This has been my method on several filters over the years......
When it finally came off, looked like someone shot it ......several times!!!!:D:)

I used one of those "cupped" things that a 3/8" socket will turn on my trucks filter....damn thing was a smidge too big, placed a paper towel over the filter - tapped the cup over and it came off like magic!
 

lugbolt

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ZG127S-54
Oct 15, 2015
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You're all right and you're all wrong.

I've used every one of those methods, and nothing beats the air hammer with a dull chisel in it. That filter comes off within seconds and very little effort. But you do have to be mindful of what you're doing; easy to do damage to other parts.

It's tight. If you look at the new filter, you'll see why. It's aluminum; heavy duty, and screws onto a steel/iron housing. Whenever you have aluminum screwing into steel, or vise versa, they get really tight. That and if you don't tighten it enough; it won't compress the o-ring, and it'll back itself off and then it leaks. Kubota didn't want them to leak I guess.
 

Tooljunkie

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L1501,home built carry all, mini plow blade.
May 13, 2014
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Lugbolt, i use the air hammer method also.but i would never suggest it.
The resulting possible damage and someone would be trying to hold me to blame. My new air hammer makes quick work of things that were somewhat
difficult in the past. Second best money i ever spent.

The locking pliers are good too,i have a gianormous pair of slip joint pliers that work really well. 20" long handles give lots of grip and great leverage.
 
Last edited:
Oct 8, 2014
623
4
16
oregon
The real wrench is cut out of plate steel, i.e. thin. It's got a tooth or hook on the tip. The body is curved to match the filter diameter. The tooth goes into a slot. I use a strap wrench, more or less fan belt material. That chain wrench is close to what plumbers use to snap cast iron pipe, might as well use a pipe wrench. It's not fun taking off a torn up filter.