DEF---DIESEL EXHAUST FLUID

Clint from Flint

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Do you know what DEF fluid is? It's Diesel Exhaust Fluid.



Every Diesel truck that has been made since 2010 is required to use it. It's a product made of 67% Urea fertilizer and 33% distilled water. Every diesel truck you see driving down the road today has to have this product to drive or they will shut down. There are regulators inside the engine that mix DEF with the Diesel to reduce Diesel emissions. That's the purpose of DEF.

Right now, Russia is the largest exporter of Urea by a wide margin. Qatar is second. Egypt and China are Tied for 3rd. Both Russia and China have decided to no longer export Urea.

On top of that, India is the largest manufacturer of Urea in the world even though they consume most of what they make. What little they would export..........they no longer do. They are now stopping the exportation of any and all Urea minus a deal they just cut with Sri Lanka.

What does this mean for you and me?

Well, first, the United States imports most of it's Urea fertilizer. We are the third largest importer in the entire world. We depend on other countries to eat, drive and ship our products.

Secondly... Flying J is the largest Service provider for Truckers around the Unites States. I'm sure you've seen their massive gas stations when traveling around the country. Flying J gets 70% of their DEF fluid from shipments via Union Pacific railroad. UP has single user access to the Fertilizer plants that Urea/DEF fluid comes from. No other rail provider has access to these distribution points. This means Flying J can't just go around Union Pacific. Union Pacific is in charge....for a reason I'm gonna mention in a few paragraphs.

Flying J provides 30% of all DEF consumed in the United States. UP has told Flying J to reduce their shipments by a whopping 50%. And if they do not comply then they will be completely embargoed. That would in effect bankrupt FJ. This means that 30% of all DEF consumed by truckers in the US is no longer available at the largest travel service center for the entire trucking industry.

Rome rotted from the inside out. It was easily invaded because it was occupied with internal problems. It appears we have discovered the Trigger. It is DEF fluid.

If this holds up, DEF shortages will be the catalyst that causes food shortages in the coming months. Not only is there a shortage of fertilizer to grow crops in drought-stricken states (See Kansas' drop in wheat production for 2022)....but....now it looks like, unless the Federal Government intervenes via the Defense Production Act, ...which I am no longer confident they will....there is gonna be an absolute massive shortage of trucking in the coming months.

There simply isn't going to be DEF fluid sufficient to keep the engines running and moving. Many places selling DEF are now limiting the amount of DEF you can buy in their stores.

I would think long and hard about the decisions you are making right now. Where you live. What you spend money on. How you prepare. This is so real that the CEO of Flying J, Shameek Konar was summoned to a Surface Transportation Board hearing to give them all this info.

Here is the next deep dive, from what I have read...Blackrock is the majority shareholder of Union Pacific railroad. How is that important? Americas biggest fertilizer producer is CF Industries. Their largest shareholder is Blackrock. Blackrock controls the fertilizer industry in the U.S.. Union Pacific has exclusive rights to distribution points of fertilizer. Urea is fertilizer. Flying J needs Urea/DEF. Blackrock is controlling everything.

The Chairman of the BlackRock Investment Institute is Tom Donilon, President Obama’s former National Security Advisor. Tom Donilon’s brother, Mike Donilon is a Senior Advisor to Joe Biden. Tom Donilon’s wife, Catherine Russell, is the White House Personnel Director. Tom Donilon’s daughter, Sarah Donilon, who graduated college in 2019, now works on the White House National Security Council.

It appears Blackrock is spearheading the dismantling of the US system on behalf of the Globalists. And the first domino they are pushing over is the energy sector. They are using DEF to get the party started. This is one sector of the biggest downfalls in political repercussions this country has ever faced…
 
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MINICUP28

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THANKS FOR THE HEADS UP! THEY AE TRYING TO SEND US BACK TO THE DARK AGES...
 
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Code

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Go read last year of articles on zerohedge. Been known a good bit. Its not just blackrock either.

on a global adversarial scale read about chinas doctrine. Not fox news bs. Read scholarly studies. They play the very long game. Their latest doctrine is to fight without fight and destroy from within. They are really good at it too. Its facinating history to read.

tinfoil hat time.
guess where thebase chemicals for cheap fetanyl is made and shipped from? Guess what #1 OD drug is in us?

Do you know what DEF fluid is? It's Diesel Exhaust Fluid.



Every Diesel truck that has been made since 2010 is required to use it. It's a product made of 67% Urea fertilizer and 33% distilled water. Every diesel truck you see driving down the road today has to have this product to drive or they will shut down. There are regulators inside the engine that mix DEF with the Diesel to reduce Diesel emissions. That's the purpose of DEF.

Right now, Russia is the largest exporter of Urea by a wide margin. Qatar is second. Egypt and China are Tied for 3rd. Both Russia and China have decided to no longer export Urea.

On top of that, India is the largest manufacturer of Urea in the world even though they consume most of what they make. What little they would export..........they no longer do. They are now stopping the exportation of any and all Urea minus a deal they just cut with Sri Lanka.

What does this mean for you and me?

Well, first, the United States imports most of it's Urea fertilizer. We are the third largest importer in the entire world. We depend on other countries to eat, drive and ship our products.

Secondly... Flying J is the largest Service provider for Truckers around the Unites States. I'm sure you've seen their massive gas stations when traveling around the country. Flying J gets 70% of their DEF fluid from shipments via Union Pacific railroad. UP has single user access to the Fertilizer plants that Urea/DEF fluid comes from. No other rail provider has access to these distribution points. This means Flying J can't just go around Union Pacific. Union Pacific is in charge....for a reason I'm gonna mention in a few paragraphs.

Flying J provides 30% of all DEF consumed in the United States. UP has told Flying J to reduce their shipments by a whopping 50%. And if they do not comply then they will be completely embargoed. That would in effect bankrupt FJ. This means that 30% of all DEF consumed by truckers in the US is no longer available at the largest travel service center for the entire trucking industry.

Rome rotted from the inside out. It was easily invaded because it was occupied with internal problems. It appears we have discovered the Trigger. It is DEF fluid.

If this holds up, DEF shortages will be the catalyst that causes food shortages in the coming months. Not only is there a shortage of fertilizer to grow crops in drought-stricken states (See Kansas' drop in wheat production for 2022)....but....now it looks like, unless the Federal Government intervenes via the Defense Production Act, ...which I am no longer confident they will....there is gonna be an absolute massive shortage of trucking in the coming months.

There simply isn't going to be DEF fluid sufficient to keep the engines running and moving. Many places selling DEF are now limiting the amount of DEF you can buy in their stores.

I would think long and hard about the decisions you are making right now. Where you live. What you spend money on. How you prepare. This is so real that the CEO of Flying J, Shameek Konar was summoned to a Surface Transportation Board hearing to give them all this info.

Here is the next deep dive, from what I have read...Blackrock is the majority shareholder of Union Pacific railroad. How is that important? Americas biggest fertilizer producer is CF Industries. Their largest shareholder is Blackrock. Blackrock controls the fertilizer industry in the U.S.. Union Pacific has exclusive rights to distribution points of fertilizer. Urea is fertilizer. Flying J needs Urea/DEF. Blackrock is controlling everything.

The Chairman of the BlackRock Investment Institute is Tom Donilon, President Obama’s former National Security Advisor. Tom Donilon’s brother, Mike Donilon is a Senior Advisor to Joe Biden. Tom Donilon’s wife, Catherine Russell, is the White House Personnel Director. Tom Donilon’s daughter, Sarah Donilon, who graduated college in 2019, now works on the White House National Security Council.

It appears Blackrock is spearheading the dismantling of the US system on behalf of the Globalists. And the first domino they are pushing over is the energy sector. They are using DEF to get the party started. This is one sector of the biggest downfalls in political repercussions this country has ever faced…
 
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North Idaho Wolfman

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I think your putting a little to much US political spin on this issue!
I don't think UP has anything to do with The Ukrainian war, or South Korea, or Australia. 🤪


Modern diesels require the injection of DEF — diesel exhaust fluid — into the exhaust stream in order to meet current exhaust emissions standards. Unfortunately, the main component of DEF is urea (along with de-ionized water), a byproduct of industrial ammonia production. And the largest exporter of urea is Russia, currently engaged in a war with Ukraine and, consequently, facing worldwide sanctions.

To make matters worse, urea also is a key ingredient in fertilizer, which has skyrocketed in cost due to the pandemic and shipping slowdowns. In fact, China — the previous No. 4 urea exporter — has at least temporarily stopped exporting the chemical in order to meet agricultural demands in its own country.

According to a report by Mansfield Energy, urea prices were $600/ton in December — three times the normal rate.

“Across the board, major DEF manufacturers are struggling to maintain supplies,” the report stated. “Most of the major manufacturers have changed annual contracts to monthly spot-priced allocations. Many are reducing their DEF output to increase fertilizer production. Others expect regional outages throughout the year due to labor shortages and supply gaps. Price hikes have been commonplace…”

The shortage has already affected South Korea and Australia, two countries that import nearly all of their urea needs. As reported by Korea JoonAng Daily, a 10-liter container of DEF was retailing for about $51 in South Korea in early November — an increase of more than 750% compared to a year earlier. And while U.S. urea imports only hover around 10%, it faces other problems. Last year, Hurricane Ida damaged some of the major Gulf Coast chemical manufacturing plants, creating delivery challenges. Now, according to a report in S&P Global, widespread railroad service problems in the U.S. could sideline 10% of the nation’s commercial trucking fleet because of fuel and additives supply disruptions — specifically, for DEF.

As the report noted, during an April 27 hearing of the Surface Transportation Board, Pilot Travel Centers CEO Shameek Konar said the aforementioned disruptions have led to Union Pacific Railroad ordering Pilot to reduce its DEF deliveries or face a shipment embargo.

“It’s an absolute disaster. Trucking is already so tight, and we’re having freight problems,” Konar said. “It will hurt our supply chains at a time when we cannot afford it. We want to be part of the solution, but the current situation is untenable for us.”

While the agricultural industry has a fallback of sorts — manure — the same can’t be said of diesel-powered vehicles. The only alternative is rising cost. The Argus DEF Weekly, a product of Argus Media, pegged bulk quantities (a typical order of about 1,500 gallons) of DEF at Dallas at 60.5 cents/gallon at the beginning of 2021; by early December, it was $1.59/gallon. A major supplier, SC Lubricants (SCL) announced back-to-back price increases in December and January that, together, put DEF prices “at the highest they have been in history,” noted a report on the company’s website.

“Based on what we have been seeing and experiencing over the past year, this was to be expected but it’s still a blow for our customers, for sure,” said SCL Vice President of Customer Solutions Dan Dziwanowski. “Unfortunately, everyone is anticipating this trend to continue since there are no signs that costs for urea, transportation, packaging, and others will stop their upward trend.”

According to SCL, a market update released by Blue DEF noted that every step in the process to bring DEF to market has become more costly, from those incurred by domestic urea producers to transportation costs to packaging for totes, drums, jugs and bulk. To make matters worse, the industry is dealing with worker shortages and imported prill (a granular form of urea) that has created a shortage of raw materials.
 
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mcfarmall

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Everybody calm down. It's all for the good of the environment.
 
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GreensvilleJay

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Kinda makes you wonder WHY CAN-USA doesn't make DEF (and everything else) within OUR boarders ?
It is possible IF you get rid of the greed and corruption in the 'supply chain'.
 
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Bmyers

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Kinda makes you wonder WHY CAN-USA doesn't make DEF (and everything else) within OUR boarders ?
It is possible IF you get rid of the greed and corruption in the 'supply chain'.
There you go again, trying to make America great again.

We are our own worst enemies. I myself is part of the problem. I like my cheap stuff. When the wife and I was younger, the cheap stuff was all we could afford.

Now that we are older, I do try to purchase and spend money on 'American' made products, yet they are harder and harder to fine. Although, we are starting to see them returning.

So, when I'm looking at products online, I try to determine if they are American made/American assembled to help support US based companies even if it cost me a few more dollars. Yet, in full disclosure there is a limit to how much more I am willing to pay.

That still makes me part of the problem with bringing back business.
 
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lynnmor

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There you go again, trying to make America great again.

We are our own worst enemies.
Since we don't even let the lazy starve, the incredible amount of programs makes working a thing of the past. Just ask any small business if they can find the number of good workers they need. Being irresponsible is very rewarding.
 
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Yooper

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Wolfman, as a former OTR truck mechanic I am curious what would happen if you bypassed the def injection. I am assuming that the particulate filter (or what was known as the muffler) would eventually plug up?

Left the occupation in 1989 so I am way removed from what is going on
 

bmblank

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There you go again, trying to make America great again.

We are our own worst enemies. I myself is part of the problem. I like my cheap stuff. When the wife and I was younger, the cheap stuff was all we could afford.

Now that we are older, I do try to purchase and spend money on 'American' made products, yet they are harder and harder to fine. Although, we are starting to see them returning.

So, when I'm looking at products online, I try to determine if they are American made/American assembled to help support US based companies even if it cost me a few more dollars. Yet, in full disclosure there is a limit to how much more I am willing to pay.

That still makes me part of the problem with bringing back business.
The ridiculous thing is that we can buy something elsewhere AND have it shipped right to our doors for far less than the domestic alternative. Moving things halfway around the world surely isn't free.
We need to look at WHY it's so damn expensive to make stuff domestically compared to elsewhere.
Granted, there are some costs that none of us (we'll say more than 99% just to be safe) would be willing to match - you know, slave labor and whatnot in other, less friendly countries. But there are several costs added for, what seems to me, no good reason.

Yes, it's a complicated problem, but bottom line - A domestic manufacturer (domestic to wherever) should be able to build a product and get that product to the customer for less than it costs to get it elsewhere.
 
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fried1765

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The ridiculous thing is that we can buy something elsewhere AND have it shipped right to our doors for far less than the domestic alternative. Moving things halfway around the world surely isn't free.
We need to look at WHY it's so damn expensive to make stuff domestically compared to elsewhere.
Granted, there are some costs that none of us (we'll say more than 99% just to be safe) would be willing to match - you know, slave labor and whatnot in other, less friendly countries. But there are several costs added for, what seems to me, no good reason.

Yes, it's a complicated problem, but bottom line - A domestic manufacturer (domestic to wherever) should be able to build a product and get that product to the customer for less than it costs to get it elsewhere.
When overseas labor is often less than 10% of USA labor, there is no possible way for US manufacturers to compete.
 
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GreensvilleJay

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re: When overseas labor is often less than 10% of USA labor, there is no possible way for US manufacturers to compete.

gee, it HAS to cost a few bucks for them seacan ships to get from China to here..... !!

course NOW I'm wondering how many gallons of diesel it takes for one ship,one way... bet someone KNOWS the cost per pound/per seacan/ per mile.......... probably cheaper than hauling the same seacan cross the USA ??
 

jkrubi12

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Wolfman, as a former OTR truck mechanic I am curious what would happen if you bypassed the def injection. I am assuming that the particulate filter (or what was known as the muffler) would eventually plug up?

Left the occupation in 1989 so I am way removed from what is going on
DEF is injected into a device known as an SCR (Selective Catalyst Reductant) which is like a catalytic converter (of sorts) which uses the DEF fluid and high temperature to convert nitrous oxide (a diesel exhaust by-product) into water and nitrogen. In my Ram Cummins diesel truck, the SCR is the last component in the exhaust treatment system (right before the tailpipe).

Diesel exhaust systems usually also include a 'DPF', or Diesel Particulate Filter. This DPF uses heat and diesel fuel to burn (or re-burn) 'soot', another diesel exhaust by-product.

Currently in the US, bypassing any component of the diesel exhaust after treatment system violates EPA regs, and is being enforced with astronomical fines. DOT officials at both state & federal levels are working jointly to identify and spank anyone tampering with the components.

If a vehicle were to 'run out' of DEF, the vehicle's on-board computer ('ECM') would/could derate the engine to idle or shut it down completely until 'reset'.
 

lugbolt

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Wolfman, as a former OTR truck mechanic I am curious what would happen if you bypassed the def injection. I am assuming that the particulate filter (or what was known as the muffler) would eventually plug up?

Left the occupation in 1989 so I am way removed from what is going on
no
the dpf has nothing to do with the def system
def is injected post doc/dpf. It reduces oxides of nitrogen and converts those gases to "harmless" ammonia--hence one reason modern diesels sometimes reek of ammonia (and make some, myself included) quite nauseous.

DEF is actually part of the SCR system. SCR is "selective catalyst reduction".

Now then, there are safeguards programmed into the ecu that sense the quality of the def, as well as the exhaust gases pre and post doc/dpf and def. If the ecu doesn't see what it want's to, it will derate the power meaning you might only get 50% power, or in some (a lot of) cases, it will IDLE, and that is it. Throttling up does nothing, it just idles and idles and beeps and flashes lights at you. Some will just shut down completely if the ecu senses a "problem". So, just removing the def system is going to throw the ecu bad information such that it is going to be derated or shut down completely depending on the system. The EPA among other agencies have been thoroughly routing the companies that sell and/or install "Delete kits", and the ones left, are VERY careful as to what they sell and who they sell to. "Delete kits" are complete kits that allow one to remove the DEF system, DPF/DOC, and then has a programmed ecu that removes the functionality that causes shutdowns and derating. In doing this "delete", the user has now removed all exhaust emission devices, which lften results in a side effect of a significant power/torque increase.

I do believe that because we rely heavily on diesel powered vehicles for everything we own, that the reduction of def import combined with the already big issues within the industries is going to result in some big time problems. I saw this coming, as did many. The bigger problem at hand is how "we" have outsourced our entire economy to foreign countries, and now we are seeing a very VERY small part of the consequences of doing that. There are perks to the practice, but there are also consequences. Both can be temporary or they can be permanent, and they can be minor or they can be major. All depends on how each situation is handled, and so far, starting in 2021-01-20, I see a TON of direct and indirect blunders that have lasting consequences. And not just economically. If things don't change soon, you're fixing to find out why grandma saved her bacon grease.
 
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Fordtech86

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The EPA among other agencies have been thoroughly routing the companies that sell and/or install "Delete kits", and the ones left, are VERY careful as to what they sell and who they sell to.

Currently in the US, bypassing any component of the diesel exhaust after treatment system violates EPA regs, and is being enforced with astronomical fines. DOT officials at both state & federal levels are working jointly to identify and spank anyone tampering with the components.
🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
 

Yooper

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Okay. Got it. The reason I ask is I know how much we depend on trucking for almost everything we consume. If there is no solution to this issue I see the worst shortage problem this country has ever seen. And I have no confidence our government will get out in front of this. The preppers might be gloating here in a little bit
 
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fried1765

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re: When overseas labor is often less than 10% of USA labor, there is no possible way for US manufacturers to compete.

gee, it HAS to cost a few bucks for them seacan ships to get from China to here..... !!

course NOW I'm wondering how many gallons of diesel it takes for one ship,one way... bet someone KNOWS the cost per pound/per seacan/ per mile.......... probably cheaper than hauling the same seacan cross the USA ??
SEACAN shipping is very cheap, compared to the labor cost differential.
Though it is much more costly now than it has been in the recent past.
 

skeets

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SO wondering out side the box here, what else could be used? I mean a gallon of something else so the puter would think the tank is full and let the motor run? Like what would happen if you put a gallon of gas in? Or water with dawn in it,, there has to be some alternative