When the wind decides to turn a barn into a chicken coop!

jyoutz

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That would be very much appreciated and I agree that 10' would be a good height from the floor to the underside of the trusses.
I got home early today and snapped some photos.
 

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jyoutz

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The barn has also handled 38” snows with no issues.
One last thing. The square tubes that the frame is constructed from looks small, but the walls are 1/4” thick. They are stout.
 

fried1765

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Not sure how things work where you live, but here in New Jersey, unless you get a public adjuster, you will get ripped off. The insurance company isn’t working for you, they are working for themselves and trying to pay out as little as possible. I’ve have severe wind damage three times. And hired a public adjuster for them all. Even with the money they charge. You still make out way better. Just my 2¢ Best of luck

Rich
"public adjuster"........was .not needed at all in my case!
I had a major fire loss (years ago), and used only the USAA adjuster.
Great guy, .....very fair.....absolutely no issues!

Obviously though, every situation is different.
 

mcmxi

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I am confident that mine would also survive those conditions. He welded frame never creaks or moves.
One of the problems with the barn that collopsed is that the side facing the wind was a flat 15'x40' wall. I want a symmetric pitched roof to reduce the wind load.
 

mcmxi

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I got home early today and snapped some photos.
@jyoutz, thank you so much for all of those great photos. You have a fantastic barn there and it'd be a dream to have something as nice as that. I hope I can post some photos in the next year that show a structure as well built, functional and practical as what you have. Thanks again and much appreciated.
 

jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
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@jyoutz, thank you so much for all of those great photos. You have a fantastic barn there and it'd be a dream to have something as nice as that. I hope I can post some photos in the next year that show a structure as well built, functional and practical as what you have. Thanks again and much appreciated.
You’re welcome. When I bought the place, I thought that the span distance between the trusses would be a problem. But 17 years later it has withstood high winds and 3+ feet of snow without any damage. I think the thick walled tubing and purlins provide the strength needed to withstand these events. I have been working inside with 60+ mph winds and have never heard the structure creak. Welding the structure together instead of bolting makes everything rigid.
 

fried1765

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I got home early today and snapped some photos.
Are those flourescent bulbs?
I just changed my 34 four footers, and 24 eight footers to LED.
Much lower cost to operate, and much longer life.
No need to replace fixtures, just rewire to bypass ballast.
 

jyoutz

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Are those flourescent bulbs?
I just changed my 20 four footers, and 24 eight footers to LED.
Much lower cost to operate, and much longer life.
No need to replace fixtures, just rewire to bypass ballast.
Yes they are. I’m going to look into doing that when my current box of bulbs is used up.
 

mcmxi

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A State Farm adjuster showed up this afternoon. He drove here from CO! He's estimating around $40k to replace the structure but I'll know in a few days how much they'll pay out. He did say that if a contractor comes back with a quote that's greater than the pay out, they'll cover the difference ... within reason.
 
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mcmxi

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I received a pay out confirmation from the insurance company this morning. After subtracting some fees and the deductible they're giving me $43K to replace the barn with the option for an additional $6K if needed. I think I can work with that to make a really decent structure for the tractor, some implements, the mixer, etc.

I've asked my neighbor (owns his own construction business) to give me an estimate on pouring a 30'x40' slab with 4' foundation walls. I've also asked him to give me an estimate for a complete build with the same slab/foundation.
 
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Hkb82

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Glad nobody was hurt during that.

I’m with the cow fart comment. Not knocking the op but that sure doesn’t look very well built. So many things wrong with it I won’t even list them.
I have a steel barn and also think they are great but even a properly built framed or post building like you had would have taken those winds I think. Since you were a welder I’m sure the next building will be way over built and last forever lol
Can’t wait to hear what your insurance says
 

S-G-R

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Two nice early Christmas presents. Looking forward to seeing the new build come together.
 
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mcmxi

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I've started to get some prices on a new structure and I think it might be helpful for others if I share some pricing in this thread. I'll update the table below as the months go by but I'm hoping to have this structure completed before the summer, ideally long before.

I plan on doing a lot of the work myself with the exception of the concrete. My neighbor is a contractor and he's going to give me a quote on the concrete work. He's currently building another shop on his property that's 40'x40' and it's going to be really nice. My metal "shed" isn't going to be that fancy. Just a steel framed structure with sheet metal on the roof and walls, a couple of roll up doors (garage doors), one standard 36" access door, no windows and some basic wiring (220V already at the site) for power, lights, etc. I do want to make it such that it could be incrementally improved such as adding interior siding, heat, water, etc., so that I could turn it into more than just a metal storage shed.

The trusses would cost about $6,000 for delivery from NC to MT so I'm looking at buying the material and making them myself as well as possibly driving to/from to pick them up. I'm sure I could drive there and back for a lot less than $6,000. I have a 22ft flatbed trailer and the trusses are about 15' long so not a big problem.

Once it warms up I'll start the process of tearing down the collapsed barn, sorting and saving as much material as possible, and clearing the area in preparation for concrete.

cost_01.jpg


This sketch was provided by a company that sells steel building "kits" but it gives some idea as to what I'm thinking of. I'd probably have one door offset, or maybe not. This structure is shown with a 2' stem wall which I requested in the estimate. For the record, a building kit for the structure below would cost around $43,000 delivered, but that doesn't include the concrete or installation.

barn_concept_01.jpg
 
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mcmxi

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As a sanity check I got a quote from a "local" company for a post frame structure. This quote is for a turnkey building. The columns are set in the ground 40" and they sit on concrete donuts and the holes are back-filled with dirt. If I want a 5" thick slab poured the total price would be $56,611.

cost_02.jpg

pole_framing.jpg
 
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DDCD

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As a sanity check I got a quote from a "local" company for a post frame structure. This quote is for a turnkey building. The columns are set in the ground 40" and they sit on concrete donuts and the holes are back-filled with dirt. If I want a 5" thick slab poured the total price would be $56,611.

View attachment 72855
View attachment 72860
I did post frame with post protectors for termite peace of mind and it's been up for two years with no issues. We have mostly south wind 60-80mph not counting tornadoes. The roof is opposite north/south so the wind can't peel the panels back (happened to a neighbor).

I did 6" floating slab, spray foam, all 26 gauge metal. Most steel buildings use 26 but it's because the supports are further apart.

Trusses 5' on center with posts every 10'. 5x5 solid posts that still have good chemical treatment.

I did wood because I can staple Romex to the walls. Steel is better but I don't buy the "wood burns" arguement- a steel building won't survive a hot fire any better than a wood building.

I am surrounded by post frame and steel suppliers so we had plenty of options. Steel was almost 50% more at the time. If you want any pictures or details message me.
 
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mcmxi

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I did post frame with post protectors for termite peace of mind and it's been up for two years with no issues. We have mostly south wind 60-80mph not counting tornadoes. The roof is opposite north/south so the wind can't peel the panels back (happened to a neighbor).

I did 6" floating slab, spray foam, all 26 gauge metal. Most steel buildings use 26 but it's because the supports are further apart.

Trusses 5' on center with posts every 10'. 5x5 solid posts that still have good chemical treatment.

I did wood because I can staple Romex to the walls. Steel is better but I don't buy the "wood burns" arguement- a steel building won't survive a hot fire any better than a wood building.

I am surrounded by post frame and steel suppliers so we had plenty of options. Steel was almost 50% more at the time. If you want any pictures or details message me.
Sounds like a very nice building. I think I'm going to stick with a steel frame structure but not sure yet which direction I'm going in. Once my neighbor provides a quote for the concrete work I'll have a better idea. Structures up here need to be designed to withstand a 60lb/sq.ft. snow load and I don't think the trusses mentioned in the table above will do that set 10ft apart. I've got more research to do. At least I know that the columns are good to go in terms of compression and buckling.
 

DDCD

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Sounds like a very nice building. I think I'm going to stick with a steel frame structure but not sure yet which direction I'm going in. Once my neighbor provides a quote for the concrete work I'll have a better idea. Structures up here need to be designed to withstand a 60lb/sq.ft. snow load and I don't think the trusses mentioned in the table above will do that set 10ft apart. I've got more research to do. At least I know that the columns are good to go in terms of compression and buckling.
The snow and heavy wind is not something we deal with here. The main advantage of post frame is you don't have to put a floor in which is why they make great haybarns.

My next building will be steel if I can afford it. Plenty of reading for days over on garage journal about all types of buildings.
 

North Idaho Wolfman

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If you want to incrementally improve it, Put some kind of vapor barrier under the concrete, on outsides of the stem walls and walls and roofs.
It's not something that's easily or cheaply done after the fact.
You could throw all the insulation you want at it and without a vapor barrier it's worthless.
One other thing to consider especially if you want a really nice work space is Hydronics in the slab.
It's super cheap to do it before concrete goes in and it works tremendously well!
 
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mcmxi

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If you want to incrementally improve it, Put some kind of vapor barrier under the concrete, on outsides of the stem walls and walls and roofs.
It's not something that's easily or cheaply done after the fact.
You could throw all the insulation you want at it and without a vapor barrier it's worthless.
One other thing to consider especially if you want a really nice work space is Hydronics in the slab.
It's super cheap to do it before concrete goes in and it works tremendously well!
Great ideas and information. Thanks very much.

I sent out another RFQ yesterday for a steel building and received an email this morning. I need to call the salesman back to discuss my specific needs.