SVL95-2S Running Hot with Drum Mulcher

CottonValley

New member

Equipment
SVL 95-2
Nov 19, 2018
12
1
3
Tuskegee, AL
I understand why you think that way, and it’s very plausible. I’ve been in close contact with my Kabota mechanic. After talking to him, I put a bypass switch on the loftness hydraulic cooler. This made the cooler run all the time. When the overheating occurred, I checked all the hydraulic hoses with a laser thermometer. The hydraulics were running at 147°, yet the motor was running above 230°. What’s your thoughts on that?
I wonder if that is actually true? Could it be the the mulched is putting such a load on the engine when it's running that is causing the engine to overheat regardless of the hydraulic temp? This would account for why having a aux hydraulic cooler would not help the situation. I am running a FECON mulcher with no aux hydraulic cooler.
 

whitetiger

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Equipment
Kubota tech..BX2370, RCK60, B7100HST, RTV900 w plow, Ford 1100 FWA
Nov 20, 2011
1,882
561
113
Kansas City, KS
That is a question I have. I am looking at the temp gauge and the 9114 code is for ENGINE temp. Question I have is how is hydraulic temp related to engine temp? There is no gauge I am aware of to see the hydraulic temp.
There is no temperature gauge for the hydraulic oil, just a switch controlling the light in the panel. The switch is located on the LF corner of the hydraulic tank.

The only correlation between the engine coolant temperature and the hydraulic oil temperature is the radiator and cooler is they are built as one unit.

Have you removed the top cover from the intercooler and blown it out?
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
There is no temperature gauge for the hydraulic oil, just a switch controlling the light in the panel. The switch is located on the LF corner of the hydraulic tank.

The only correlation between the engine coolant temperature and the hydraulic oil temperature is the radiator and cooler is they are built as one unit.

Have you removed the top cover from the intercooler and blown it out?
I keep a laser thermometer in my cab. Whenever I stop, I check the temp of my hydraulic hoses. So far, my hydraulic fluid temp is hovering around 125-130 degrees. At 125 degrees my external hydraulic fluid cooler fans kick on.
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
I wonder if that is actually true? Could it be the the mulched is putting such a load on the engine when it's running that is causing the engine to overheat regardless of the hydraulic temp? This would account for why having a aux hydraulic cooler would not help the situation. I am running a FECON mulcher with no aux hydraulic cooler.
The mulcher running is defiantly causing the “running hot” issue. I can run any other attachments and the motor stays cool. My question is; why are some folks having this problem with mulcher and others are not?
 

whitetiger

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Equipment
Kubota tech..BX2370, RCK60, B7100HST, RTV900 w plow, Ford 1100 FWA
Nov 20, 2011
1,882
561
113
Kansas City, KS
The mulcher running is defiantly causing the “running hot” issue. I can run any other attachments and the motor stays cool. My question is; why are some folks having this problem with mulcher and others are not?
Once again, are you talking about the hydraulic motor or are you calling the diesel internal combustion engine a motor?
 
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Dieseldonato

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Equipment
B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
544
301
63
Pa
Typical hydraulic fluid is already about a 15wt oil.(aw46) as I recall thats what the kubota we got at the township called for. Lowering the viscosity isn't going to help the hydraulics.
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
Once again, are you talking about the hydraulic motor or are you calling the diesel internal combustion engine a motor?
“Engine/motor” is easier that constantly typing “diesel internal combustion engine”. I know the word “motor” properly referee’s to an “electric conductive motor”, but sometimes in conversation is used interchangeably. I will not use the word motor. Sorry.

The engine is running hot. When checking the hydraulic hoses; the hydraulic pump does not appear to be not running hot. The “hydraulic pump HOT” indicator light is not illuminating.
The “Engine HOT” indicator light “is” lumenating and the warning signal is sounding. Hope this helps.
 
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Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
Typical hydraulic fluid is already about a 15wt oil.(aw46) as I recall thats what the kubota we got at the township called for. Lowering the viscosity isn't going to help the hydraulics.
The guy who is trying lower viscosity hydraulic fluid has some hydraulic experience. He noted that the buildup of heat could be caused by hydraulic slamming due to cavitation. He volunteered to spend the money and try it, so I’m glad he’s trying it.
So far, no one (even two dealerships) has claimed the resolution, we only have ideas.
 

Dieseldonato

Well-known member

Equipment
B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
544
301
63
Pa
Cavitation is caused by air in the system, lower viscosity fluid won't help that.
Is it safe to assume the machine quick connects are sized correctly? I only ask because we had issues with a 3ft road mill on our kubota that we didn't have on the old new Holland. Turned out the little fittings on the Kubota weren't actually rated for the high flow option. They caused a restriction in the system and heated up the hydraulics pretty fast. We also had (dealer) to add a case drain line that went directly back to the tank.
I've been following along, but am still at a bit of a loss if it's the engine over heating, they hydraulics, or both?
 

whitetiger

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Equipment
Kubota tech..BX2370, RCK60, B7100HST, RTV900 w plow, Ford 1100 FWA
Nov 20, 2011
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Kansas City, KS
“Engine/motor” is easier that constantly typing “diesel internal combustion engine”. I know the word “motor” properly referee’s to an “electric conductive motor”, but sometimes in conversation is used interchangeably. I will not use the word motor. Sorry.

The engine is running hot. When checking the hydraulic hoses; the hydraulic pump does not appear to be not running hot. The “hydraulic pump HOT” indicator light is not illuminating.
The “Engine HOT” indicator light “is” lumenating and the warning signal is sounding. Hope this helps.
The reason I asked whether you were referring to the engine as a motor is because your mulcher has a motor that turns it. It makes a huge difference because the motor getting hot would be the hydraulics getting hot, not the engine. You have now confirmed that it is in fact your engine that is getting hot, not your motor.

Have you tightened the fan belt, and washed out the radiator, condenser, and intercooler?
Check the Left-Hand side of the radiator fan shroud to see if the rubber seal is in place where it meets the hydraulic cooler.
 
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GreensvilleJay

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Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
4,657
1,476
113
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
hmmm. the radiator and cooler is they are built as one unit. ...
OK, so the really hot hydraulic oil could be 'stealing' engine fluid cooling capacity from the one rad does both ?
It'd be interesting to know the size of the rad is, % for engine vs % for hydraulics. You can work out the 'heat load' of the mulcher (GPM, temperature, etc.) The 'mulcher maker' will KNOW how big a rad you NEED for it and my gut says the combo rad is undersized for cooling BOTH fluids. That being said, if the machine will run xxGPM at yyyyPSI then the rad is SUPPOSED to be able to cool the fluid to 'nomial' operating temperature while being used within the recommended working temperatures(say -20 to +100F).
 
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whitetiger

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Kubota tech..BX2370, RCK60, B7100HST, RTV900 w plow, Ford 1100 FWA
Nov 20, 2011
1,882
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Kansas City, KS
hmmm. the radiator and cooler is they are built as one unit. ...
OK, so the really hot hydraulic oil could be 'stealing' engine fluid cooling capacity from the one rad does both ?
It'd be interesting to know the size of the rad is, % for engine vs % for hydraulics. You can work out the 'heat load' of the mulcher (GPM, temperature, etc.) The 'mulcher maker' will KNOW how big a rad you NEED for it and my gut says the combo rad is undersized for cooling BOTH fluids. That being said, if the machine will run xxGPM at yyyyPSI then the rad is SUPPOSED to be able to cool the fluid to 'nomial' operating temperature while being used within the recommended working temperatures(say -20 to +100F).
Except his hydraulic oil is running cooler than his coolant is.
The coolant section of the radiator is about 60-70 percent of the assembly.
 

Brick Axelrod

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Equipment
L5460, BH92, RCR1872, FDR2572.RTVX1100c
Apr 12, 2018
136
7
18
South Carolina
I don’t fix skid steers for a living but I do fix industrial equipment. In the past I have ran into presses running hotter than others due to different hydraulic oil in the hydraulic system making the motors / engines work harder to achieve the rated pressure and or hydraulic pump failing. Just a thought, good luck.
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
Cavitation is caused by air in the system, lower viscosity fluid won't help that.
Is it safe to assume the machine quick connects are sized correctly? I only ask because we had issues with a 3ft road mill on our kubota that we didn't have on the old new Holland. Turned out the little fittings on the Kubota weren't actually rated for the high flow option. They caused a restriction in the system and heated up the hydraulics pretty fast. We also had (dealer) to add a case drain line that went directly back to the tank.
I've been following along, but am still at a bit of a loss if it's the engine over heating, they hydraulics, or both?
Kubota change the valve/coupler that is mounted on the lift arm. They said they did a flow test after installation, although I don’t know the spec’s for flow. I don’t fix skid steers for a living but I do fix industrial equipment. In the past I have ran into presses running hotter than others due to different hydraulic oil in the hydraulic system making the motors / engines work harder to achieve the rated pressure and or hydraulic pump failing. Just a thought, good luck.
[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the suggestion. I have only use Kabota hydraulic fluid Although, others have tried fluid that is comparable to Kabota, and have not seen any significant change in temperature. We are all hoping it’s not our pump is going out do to the significant cost to repair. Thanks
 
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Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
I've seen in some equipment brochures recommendations for using an aux fan cooling kit when running these drum mulchers, do you know if your machines have them?
Could you send a link that provides a part number for the AUX fan kit. My machine pushes a ton of air out the radiator. Enough to blow your hair back when standing 3ft away. Thanks
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
Any thoughts on reducing the antifreeze ratio and using a lower viscosity oil?
There are folks on this thread that are trying different viscosity level fluids, but have not had any success. I’m not sure anyone has lowered the antifreeze ratio. At the moment I’m trying some “SuperCool” to see if this helps, but it’s been raining here so, I have not completed the job yet.
 

Mikestolarik

Member

Equipment
SVL95-2s
Feb 14, 2022
58
7
8
Florence, Alabama
There is no temperature gauge for the hydraulic oil, just a switch controlling the light in the panel. The switch is located on the LF corner of the hydraulic tank.

The only correlation between the engine coolant temperature and the hydraulic oil temperature is the radiator and cooler is they are built as one unit.

Have you removed the top cover from the intercooler and blown it out?
Yes