newbie fuel question

WDTPGA

New member

Equipment
L3200
Aug 27, 2021
6
0
1
Bigelow AR
Buy the Kubota UDT 2 and a filter, and change it now, so you will know for certain how many hours is on the oil itself. You probably have little to no knowledge of the maintenance history of the tractor, so if you do all the services now, you will know going forward what has to be done and when. I suggest that you purchase it locally at a Kubota dealer, and start having a relationship with them. You never know when you will need their assistance. When buying parts, have them put your name on the invoice, instead of "cash sale", so it will start to generate a history with them. The only time that I don't buy from a local dealer is when they don't have the part in stock, and can't get it in a reasonable time frame. Then I will purchase it from Messicks, and they usually have it in stock. If you order a part from the local dealer, make sure that they put it onto the stock order, rather than a "special" order, where they will charge you shipping. I had my tractor into the local dealer for service, and then claimed that they needed to order the part. Took 2 weeks to get the part, and they charged me $20 shipping. The part was the shim to increase the hydraulic pressure. Needless to say, I don't use that dealer for anything now! Some dealers are fair with the customer, and others like to make their money, the old fashioned way... Pick your pocket every chance they can.
Are there any special things to look out for when changing the oil. I am handy with a wrench but know nothing about tractors and like the original poster, new to this.
 

Tobers

New member
Feb 7, 2021
24
4
3
Durham, NC
Are there any special things to look out for when changing the oil. I am handy with a wrench but know nothing about tractors and like the original poster, new to this.
I've done it once :). two comments: 1. I have a mowing deck. So there was no flat service to place my oil pan. I grabbed an aluminum baking pan and decided to hold it. Don't do that. As it filled up, it buckled. A huge mess. In the future I think I'll use something to allow the oil to slide to the pan, which is would be flat on the ground. Or maybe a tube of some sort? 2. The oil certification required in my manual is outdated. The new certification standards are CH-4 and CI-4. Use diesel engine oil. See thread above.
 

Tobers

New member
Feb 7, 2021
24
4
3
Durham, NC
definitely worth considering next time. our driveway is gravel - no fun kneeling to pull those pins, and not easy to roll the deck out in the gravel, either. And it was 95 degrees. But that might be the way to go in the future.
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,039
411
83
North East
Are there any special things to look out for when changing the oil. I am handy with a wrench but know nothing about tractors and like the original poster, new to this.
I don't like giving specific instructions on how to do a particular job, because there are so many things that can go wrong, or the person reading the instructions doesn't understand what I am trying to convey to them. I strongly suggest that you review the service manuals and or the owners manuals, before doing anything. Make sure that you have the proper tools, and that the tools that you are going to be using are of a quality that they are not going to slip off the bolt or nut that you are working on, and damage the bolt / nut, or for that matter, your hands being injured as a result of them hitting a solid item causing your injury. Once you think that you have enlightened yourself enough by reading the manuals, then take the manuals to the tractor, and make sure that what you read is a reasonable representation of your actual tractor. Once you are satisfied that you believe that you know enough to do the task at hand, start working on completing the task. Also take pictures so you will have a reference should it not go back together the way it came apart. Also, check the capacity of the items that you are draining, and make sure that the catch container is large enough to accommodate the fluids that are going to be coming out. Also, make sure that you have proper amount of containers to put the used oil into for disposal. Working on your tractor is like learning to parallel parking a car. It takes practice to master the skills necessary. Some never learn to parallel park, and always look for 3 spaces in a row to drive into. Being that I don't know your skill levels, I can't caution you enough to be careful. If you don't feel confident that you can accomplish the task from start to finish, then take it to someone that has more mechanical experience, and have them teach you. Best of luck to you, and I hope that you will accept the challenges of tractor ownership and maintaining the Kubota.
Dusty
 

PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
1,234
426
83
NZ
:). I don't disagree with Dusty. But if you're a normal male, go with glancing through the manual, have a go at it, make a mess, learn for next time.

But there's some good advice in there of things to watch out for. You'll need to change filters too if you're changing oil, and the HST has a strainer on it somewhere you'll want to pull and clean.

You'll really benefit from doing this on a solid surface, not gravel. Even if that means taking your car out of the garage, and explaining the UDT that's on the floor to your wife afterwards. Working in gravel would be miserable I think.
 

Tobers

New member
Feb 7, 2021
24
4
3
Durham, NC
:). I don't disagree with Dusty. But if you're a normal male, go with glancing through the manual, have a go at it, make a mess, learn for next time.

But there's some good advice in there of things to watch out for. You'll need to change filters too if you're changing oil, and the HST has a strainer on it somewhere you'll want to pull and clean.

You'll really benefit from doing this on a solid surface, not gravel. Even if that means taking your car out of the garage, and explaining the UDT that's on the floor to your wife afterwards. Working in gravel would be miserable I think.
we moved my dad into assisted living, and closed up his estate. the good news: he had a massive shop. and I ended up with it (and I already had one). The bad news: no way the tractor gets in the garage for a bit. I'll do the transmission UDT fluid change later (and most likely pull the deck :). Gravel (and heat) indeed were miserable (but made it easier to cover the spilled oil evidence ...)
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,039
411
83
North East
If you are worried about spilling oil on the concrete floor, get a large appliance cardboard box, and cut it open. Then place it on the floor before you drive the tractor into the garage. The cardboard will absorb any oil that you might accidentally spill, and is disposable afterwards. I have a preference to the large tv boxes, because they have a special paper on the outside that the oil doesn't seep through.
 
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PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
1,234
426
83
NZ
If you are worried about spilling oil on the concrete floor, get a large appliance cardboard box, and cut it open. Then place it on the floor before you drive the tractor into the garage. The cardboard will absorb any oil that you might accidentally spill, and is disposable afterwards. I have a preference to the large tv boxes, because they have a special paper on the outside that the oil doesn't seep through.
Do you buy a lot of TVs? Or just not change oil very often.

:)

Seriously though, good advice.
 
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lynnmor

Active member

Equipment
B2601-1
May 3, 2021
207
103
43
Red Lion
If you are worried about spilling oil on the concrete floor, get a large appliance cardboard box, and cut it open. Then place it on the floor before you drive the tractor into the garage. The cardboard will absorb any oil that you might accidentally spill, and is disposable afterwards. I have a preference to the large tv boxes, because they have a special paper on the outside that the oil doesn't seep through.

When at a large warehouse type store, I pick up the skid size cardboard seperators that is between layers of product, the stores are glad to get rid of them. They are all about the same size, lay flat and a large quantity takes up little space. No cutting and flattening boxes of odd sizes.
 

jyoutz

Active member

Equipment
MX6000 HST open station. JD4100 for sale
Jan 14, 2019
217
85
28
Edgewood, New Mexico
Welcome to the forum!

Its important for you to keep the tank as full as possible to manage condensation that can form in the tank and provide the water to support bacteria that live in the fuel/water interface. They are the cause of the snotty sludge that forms in diesel fuel tanks. You can't eliminate condensation but you can minimize it.
The other reason to keep the fuel tank from getting low is you can minimize the chance of running it out of fuel. Running it out of fuel means you have to bleed the fuel system to get it started. It will happen to you at least once (don't ask me how I know this) so read up on the procedure so when it does you'll know what to do.

Once again welcome. You'll find the people here ready, willing, and able to help you.
Interesting. I have a 20 year old JD that I’m replacing with a new MX. The old JD is self bleeding after running empty. Is this not the case with new Kubotas?