Morton Building Project - NH

rc51stierhoff

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Looks great. The machine looks lonely in therešŸ˜‰Did they stop using the concrete pilings/piers that that poles/posts fastened to?
 

River19

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Looks great. The machine looks lonely in therešŸ˜‰Did they stop using the concrete pilings/piers that that poles/posts fastened to?
They used them but they are buried just below the grade............

Yeah the 2601 was the first thing in. Ram 2500 is next to it now. I can't get too crazy until the floor is done in the Spring but for winter we are going to try and cram our travel trailer in there as we are trading it in for a larger model next year so this smaller (25') one has a chance to fit ok along with the truck and tractor......fingers crossed.

I think the medium/long term plan is to get the solar system installed, wire the place up, get the floor done, and look at a 4 post Bend Oak lift on casters for additional car/toy storage since I have the height not the floor space.

But who knows.......gotta be thoughtful with how we use the space. Excited to finally have it here
"
 

rc51stierhoff

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Sep 13, 2021
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They used them but they are buried just below the grade............

Yeah the 2601 was the first thing in. Ram 2500 is next to it now. I can't get too crazy until the floor is done in the Spring but for winter we are going to try and cram our travel trailer in there as we are trading it in for a larger model next year so this smaller (25') one has a chance to fit ok along with the truck and tractor......fingers crossed.

I think the medium/long term plan is to get the solar system installed, wire the place up, get the floor done, and look at a 4 post Bend Oak lift on casters for additional car/toy storage since I have the height not the floor space.

But who knows.......gotta be thoughtful with how we use the space. Excited to finally have it here
"
I think that building looks greatā€¦nice color was that one of the standard colors or a premiumā€¦looks good.

I donā€™t mean to pick / poke, but those posts raise an eyebrow. Was there a reason to bury the bottom of the post/pole below grade? Maybe it has changed but previously my understanding was the top of the piers with brackets were engineered to be above grade even after concrete. Might be worth a check. I believe their website has cartoon sketches and images that may make more sense than my babbling aboveā€¦maybe itā€™s a different style you have? I am not sure. In past the top of concrete portion with the Morton stamp was above grade and bracket attached above grade to the pole.

 

River19

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I think that building looks greatā€¦nice color was that one of the standard colors or a premiumā€¦looks good.

I donā€™t mean to pick / poke, but those posts raise an eyebrow. Was there a reason to bury the bottom of the post/pole below grade? Maybe it has changed but previously my understanding was the top of the piers with brackets were engineered to be above grade even after concrete. Might be worth a check. I believe their website has cartoon sketches and images that may make more sense than my babbling aboveā€¦maybe itā€™s a different style you have? I am not sure. In past the top of concrete portion with the Morton stamp was above grade and bracket attached above grade to the pole.

Fair question......

On a Morton Standard building they use their "Morton Galvanized Stilt Support System" with Redi-mix concrete. So, 48" hole, galvanized support and channel, PT lumber nailed into channel with stainless nails, cement around that and then soil the last couple feet. While we would all love their highest-end install that you linked to when you are working with a $50-60K budget the Morton Standard is the way to go.

And before people get all fired up about Pressure Treated Lumber. It is covered under a 50yr warranty. That is one of the reasons I went with Morton, the warranty is fantastic and I know from personal experience (family) they honor it. So I'm 47 years old now.....if those footings fail when I am 97+, I can live with that. If they fail before then.......I will call "the guy".....

As another aside.......by going with a Morton Standard building (since I wasn't looking for lots of custom work) I was also able to get the building built within months vs. an 18+ month wait.....

EDIT: Regarding color.....I didn't pay anything extra for the blue/blue combo, so assuming standard color. I'm married, so I don't pick color combos....wife chose the blue/blue combo with white trim. I smiled and nodded.
 
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fried1765

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I think that building looks greatā€¦nice color was that one of the standard colors or a premiumā€¦looks good.

I donā€™t mean to pick / poke, but those posts raise an eyebrow. Was there a reason to bury the bottom of the post/pole below grade? Maybe it has changed but previously my understanding was the top of the piers with brackets were engineered to be above grade even after concrete. Might be worth a check. I believe their website has cartoon sketches and images that may make more sense than my babbling aboveā€¦maybe itā€™s a different style you have? I am not sure. In past the top of concrete portion with the Morton stamp was above grade and bracket attached above grade to the pole.

My 36' x 48' Morton (1984) was has 6 x 6 PT posts, with a bag of dry cement just dropped in the bottom of each hole prior to the post (mother nature would harden the bag of cement).

Some years later, Morton transitioned to the 3 piece laminated post, with the lower pieces being PT, but no concrete pier.

I agree that it would not seem to be the best idea to bury the top of post "just below the grade".
Seems as though, even with PT, that would some what defeat the (no rot?) concept of using concrete piers.

I really do like the concrete pier concept!
Wish I had'em, but my posts are planted in well drained sand, and have no indications of rot at 38 years.
About to turn 82, I am now not even slightly concerned about post rot.
 
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fried1765

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Fair question......

On a Morton Standard building they use their "Morton Galvanized Stilt Support System" with Redi-mix concrete. So, 48" hole, galvanized support and channel, PT lumber nailed into channel with stainless nails, cement around that and then soil the last couple feet. While we would all love their highest-end install that you linked to when you are working with a $50-60K budget the Morton Standard is the way to go.

And before people get all fired up about Pressure Treated Lumber. It is covered under a 50yr warranty. That is one of the reasons I went with Morton, the warranty is fantastic and I know from personal experience (family) they honor it. So I'm 47 years old now.....if those footings fail when I am 97+, I can live with that. If they fail before then.......I will call "the guy".....

As another aside.......by going with a Morton Standard building (since I wasn't looking for lots of custom work) I was also able to get the building built within months vs. an 18+ month wait.....

EDIT: Regarding color.....I didn't pay anything extra for the blue/blue combo, so assuming standard color. I'm married, so I don't pick color combos....wife chose the blue/blue combo with white trim. I smiled and nodded.

My 6 x 6 PT posts are only guaranteed for 40 years, but at 38 years, they are looking just fine (inspected at ground level and below).

"wife choose the blue/blue combo with white trim"

As my dad often said:
"A man who claims to be the boss in his own house, is apt to lie about other things too"
 
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rc51stierhoff

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Fair question......

On a Morton Standard building they use their "Morton Galvanized Stilt Support System" with Redi-mix concrete. So, 48" hole, galvanized support and channel, PT lumber nailed into channel with stainless nails, cement around that and then soil the last couple feet. While we would all love their highest-end install that you linked to when you are working with a $50-60K budget the Morton Standard is the way to go.

And before people get all fired up about Pressure Treated Lumber. It is covered under a 50yr warranty. That is one of the reasons I went with Morton, the warranty is fantastic and I know from personal experience (family) they honor it. So I'm 47 years old now.....if those footings fail when I am 97+, I can live with that. If they fail before then.......I will call "the guy".....

As another aside.......by going with a Morton Standard building (since I wasn't looking for lots of custom work) I was also able to get the building built within months vs. an 18+ month wait.....

EDIT: Regarding color.....I didn't pay anything extra for the blue/blue combo, so assuming standard color. I'm married, so I don't pick color combos....wife chose the blue/blue combo with white trim. I smiled and nodded.
EDIT: you are wise beyond your years.
 
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River19

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My 6 x 6 PT posts are only guaranteed for 40 years, but at 38 years, they are looking just fine (inspected at ground level and below).

"wife choose the blue/blue combo with white trim"

As my dad often said:
"A man who claims to be the boss in his own house, is apt to lie about other things too"
After a couple decades of marriage at this point, I clearly have learned to pick my battles. The fact that she was "excited" to have this new Morton out in front of the house (long 600'+ driveway) was a good thing, if she wanted control over the colors.....fine by me. That is clearly something I was willing to let her drive. Plus, I love the blue/blue combo. She didn't want the 2-tone look, although I probably would have done a light gray lower portion........her logic was that by going 2-tone it locks in "Industrial building" while the single color looks like nice board and batten. Again, I smiled and nodded and complimented her thought process. Live to fight another day.

This building will provide a nice home for the Kubota and probably the snowblower for it which is on a roller platform I made and in the garage currently. In the winter I will put the FEL under a tarp behind this building so my neighbor can stare at it (actually I just don't want it on the side where the roof snow will fall on it).

I can put the box blade and/or the back blade on the side of the building or in the building if need be. The winter tractor setup is blower on front and back blade on the rear so that will hopefully all be inside.
 
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fried1765

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After a couple decades of marriage at this point, I clearly have learned to pick my battles. The fact that she was "excited" to have this new Morton out in front of the house (long 600'+ driveway) was a good thing, if she wanted control over the colors.....fine by me. That is clearly something I was willing to let her drive. Plus, I love the blue/blue combo. She didn't want the 2-tone look, although I probably would have done a light gray lower portion........her logic was that by going 2-tone it locks in "Industrial building" while the single color looks like nice board and batten. Again, I smiled and nodded and complimented her thought process. Live to fight another day.

This building will provide a nice home for the Kubota and probably the snowblower for it which is on a roller platform I made and in the garage currently. In the winter I will put the FEL under a tarp behind this building so my neighbor can stare at it (actually I just don't want it on the side where the roof snow will fall on it).

I can put the box blade and/or the back blade on the side of the building or in the building if need be. The winter tractor setup is blower on front and back blade on the rear so that will hopefully all be inside.
It would seem that you have enough altidude inside that building that you could use a rack system for much of your stuff.
 
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River19

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Update:

Friday the overhead door was installed, came out great. Until I power the building it is "fine" to manually raise and lower the door, no big deal. The Liftmaster opener is already installed and just needs to be plugged into a power source.

The even bigger news is that I was able to get in touch with a good cement contractor who will be able to pour the floor within the next 2-3 weeks. Rebar, moisture barrier, 5" depth....... ~$5K not horrible......

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IMG_3878.jpeg
 
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fried1765

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Update:

Friday the overhead door was installed, came out great. Until I power the building it is "fine" to manually raise and lower the door, no big deal. The Liftmaster opener is already installed and just needs to be plugged into a power source.

The even bigger news is that I was able to get in touch with a good cement contractor who will be able to pour the floor within the next 2-3 weeks. Rebar, moisture barrier, 5" depth....... ~$5K not horrible......

View attachment 90055 View attachment 90056
You really should strongly consider adding
Update:

Friday the overhead door was installed, came out great. Until I power the building it is "fine" to manually raise and lower the door, no big deal. The Liftmaster opener is already installed and just needs to be plugged into a power source.

The even bigger news is that I was able to get in touch with a good cement contractor who will be able to pour the floor within the next 2-3 weeks. Rebar, moisture barrier, 5" depth....... ~$5K not horrible......

View attachment 90055 View attachment 90056
You really should consider having fiber added to the concrete mix!
 
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Russell King

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Liftmaster probably has a battery pack that will work for the opener and then you can probably get a solar charger for it if you want to get it working sooner.

Only problem with that is you probably canā€™t use the MyQ app to control and check on the opener if youā€™re using that app. They may allow it now but I spent a few weeks trying to figure out what was going on with that until I re-read the manual and that was a one line comment about battery powered operation
 
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River19

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Liftmaster probably has a battery pack that will work for the opener and then you can probably get a solar charger for it if you want to get it working sooner.

Only problem with that is you probably canā€™t use the MyQ app to control and check on the opener if youā€™re using that app. They may allow it now but I spent a few weeks trying to figure out what was going on with that until I re-read the manual and that was a one line comment about battery powered operation
Heck of a good point. I have the battery pack an didn't install it as I didn't want it to just die due to no charging capability, might look into a solar charger for short term.
 
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Russell King

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Heck of a good point. I have the battery pack an didn't install it as I didn't want it to just die due to no charging capability, might look into a solar charger for short term.
Just be careful and get the correct voltage solar panels to match the battery wiring.

My Liftmaster gate is based on 24v using two 12v batteries. If memory is holding out I think the door opener was also a 24v transformer that I was going to use for power but had to go back to 120v (extension cord used due to new location of opener with no power supply)
 
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River19

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Well.......we finally got here.

Cement floor was poured today......it had some wild moments but overall it came out well. The second truck evidently mixed in more calcium carbonate than they should have so there was a little "urgency" to some of the work. There was also about 2 yds of cement "leftover" that was piled up wet outside the door that the contractor and I teamed up with the B2601 to take about 6 buckets of wet cement out back and dump.......I didn't have a great plan for extra cement. I ended up making a small pad off to the side of the yard that I can drop the pallet forks, box blade etc. on for storage......I flattened it out with the tractor bucket then tamped it down with my hand steel tamper......glad I had one.

Came out well overall. Gotta let it sit for a couple days and dry before putting some "stuff" in there.

I also need to think about what I want to spread around outside the building to raise the grade a touch......gravel, stay-mat etc

EDIT: Just looked back at my original post.....May 25th.....so roughly 6 months to the day from start to finish when I gave my deposit and then through the site work, inspections etc. Targeted a budget of $50K and came in at about $57-58K for those who are interested.

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RDinNHandAZ

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Too late now but for others...... I use a 2X4 or better a 2X6 of the most rot resistant pressure treated wood to close off the entrance edge of the concrete. Then I form an apron in front of it at the approach to the door. I leave the outer edge of that apron open so the truck can back (or if you are lucky, drive) up to the internal pour. When the floor is filled I ask the driver how much concrete is left and adjust the outer form to accommodate the remainder. That way the overage you must order to be sure of having enough becomes an apron approaching the door. The pressure treated 2X6 stays in place dividing the apron from the floor to avoid cracking. I have been doing this for 20 years with great success. Recently I put 1"-2ā€ of blue or pink insulation under the apron just before the concrete goes down and it does not heave due to frost here in the north land. If I am really thinking I frame another pad in front of the man door and the last bit of concrete goes there too. If we run out I mix it later in my borrowed mixer with gravel from the perimeter back-fill and Portland cement with rebar and insulation. It always feels like I get something for nothing as the concrete would be wasted otherwise.
 
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River19

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Too late now but for others...... I use a 2X4 or better a 2X6 of the most rot resistant pressure treated wood to close off the entrance edge of the concrete. Then I form an apron in front of it at the approach to the door. I leave the outer edge of that apron open so the truck can back (or if you are lucky, drive) up to the internal pour. When the floor is filled I ask the driver how much concrete is left and adjust the outer form to accommodate the remainder. That way the overage you must order to be sure of having enough becomes an apron approaching the door. The pressure treated 2X6 stays in place dividing the apron from the floor to avoid cracking. I have been doing this for 20 years with great success. Recently I put 1"-2ā€ of blue or pink insulation under the apron just before the concrete goes down and it does not heave due to frost here in the north land. If I am really thinking I frame another pad in front of the man door and the last bit of concrete goes there too. If we run out I mix it later in my borrowed mixer with gravel from the perimeter back-fill and Portland cement with rebar and insulation. It always feels like I get something for nothing as the concrete would be wasted otherwise.

Solid suggestion......... Honestly I wasn't supposed to be involved in the pour etc. at all, this was going to be a "just write the check for the guy" type of job. Then when I checked on them I sensed a high degree of urgency and they were kinda pissed off due to the change in mix they didn't want.......

Then the next time I came out I saw a goodly amount of extra cement sitting there.......so quick first solution was to get it out of there before it set. I wouldn't have minded a solution suggestion like yours above if that came out in the heat of battle, but unfortunately it did not.

All good......have tractor......will spread a solution eventually :)
 
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