load tires or not

Goz63

Active member

Equipment
Kubota L2501, LA525 loader, QH15,Land Pride RCR1860, BB2560, SGC0660, forks
Jun 19, 2021
230
249
43
Mississippi
My buddy has my exact tractor. My tires are loaded his are not. He has to put his tractor in 4WD at times I am still running 2WD. Much improved traction. Very glad I went with loaded.
 
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Turfturd

New member

Equipment
B7510
May 20, 2021
10
1
3
Missouri
I am a new compact tractor owner. I just purchased a B7510 w/ loader.
I like the discussion here. Both seem to have there advantages.
It takes me back to my sprint car days, when we talked about suspended weight versus non suspended weight. Rolling weight versus chassis weight.
I like the idea of being able to remove the weight though. I did hang a box blade on it and that helped quite a bit. Still looking for some wheel weights.
Thanks for the discussion.
 

NHSleddog

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650
Dec 19, 2019
1,941
1,414
113
Southern, NH
Both.

I have loaded rear tires. My dealer won't deliver a tractor with a FEL without loading the tires. It is needed IMO.

I still use my ballast block (800lb lead) all the time. I use it when doing loader work and I use it when using my hydraulic auger, when snow plowing etc.
 

krakenacres

New member

Equipment
1985 Kubota L225 w/ bush hog front loader
Jul 11, 2021
7
0
1
Parma Twp MI
I have an ‘85 L225 w/FEL. I just replaced the original rear tires with new Carlyle F3 tires loaded with rim Guard. My tires are now a bit wider and contact the frame so now I need 2“ spacers.
 

568152

New member

Equipment
B6200 D HST
Aug 16, 2021
11
0
1
Keene NH
Newbie here. Got my first tractor a few months ago, a 37 year old B6200 D HST with the original turf tires still mounted. Kubota manual says not to load my turf tires. Why not? Seems that many people ignore that & fill them anyway. My rear tires had been previously loaded then drained & one also had fix-a-flat inside. Terrible mess when removing to repair rims & add tubes. Now I can't find correct replacement tires! Did buy new Carlisle 21" front tires but circumference is LESS THAN the circumference on my original 20.5 front tires, messing up my 4WD circumference ratio. Now considering changing rear turf tires from 29 to 31.5 & front tires from 20.5 to 22., if I can find any. Any reply & advice will be appreciated.
 

85Hokie

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90-'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
8,468
689
113
Bedford - VA
Age old question about loading the tires....

Cheap and easy to do - rimguard is $$$ but worth it - but the others do a great job too.

It keeps the center of gravity low on the tractor - period!
It add traction - and it does NOT place a load on the tractor! WEIGHTs do almost the exact same thing when carried low - but do place a load on the machine.

Reason not to ...... cutting grass on flat areas ..... more tire marks.... but on hills - it is a must!

I have all 4 of my B's and BX's loaded ---- only PITA is when I need to take the rim/tire off !!!
 

Outnumbered

Member

Equipment
Kubota L3901, FEL, BB1260, Forks, Caryall, 5' Tiller, RCF2060 Rotary Cutter
Oct 26, 2019
38
20
8
Moseley, VA
Load them and you will never look back. I have both my Kubota L3901 and and my FIL old Ford 2600 loaded. Helps with traction and stability. I have had to replace two of the old loaded tires on the Ford and I was able to get them on and off the tractor using some common sense and a cumalong. not a big deal for the safety and traction they provide.
 
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Tim Horton

Member

Equipment
"PEPE" RTV400
Mar 22, 2018
182
13
18
British Columbia Canada
Yes...... Would never be with out it...

I did a DIY fill on my old tractor of washer fluid and anti freeze... About 75-25% Worked well..

My tractor now came with salt fluid.. I would rather have it been dry to do another DIY fill, but it is what it is...
 

568152

New member

Equipment
B6200 D HST
Aug 16, 2021
11
0
1
Keene NH
Thanks for all the positive responses. I think loaded rear tires are the way to go. Interesting that nobody responded to my question as to why my Kubota manual says not to load turf tires???
 

Goz63

Active member

Equipment
Kubota L2501, LA525 loader, QH15,Land Pride RCR1860, BB2560, SGC0660, forks
Jun 19, 2021
230
249
43
Mississippi
Thanks for all the positive responses. I think loaded rear tires are the way to go. Interesting that nobody responded to my question as to why my Kubota manual says not to load turf tires???
No idea. I have R4s so not sure.
 

torch

Well-known member

Equipment
B7100HSD, B2789, B2550, B4672, RC54-71B, 48" cultivator, homemade FEL and Cab
Jun 10, 2016
1,810
228
63
Muskoka, Ont.
Newbie here. Got my first tractor a few months ago, a 37 year old B6200 D HST with the original turf tires still mounted. Kubota manual says not to load my turf tires. Why not?
The manual for my very similar 26 year-old B7100 manual recommends using liquid weight (water or CaCl solution) in rear tires as a "safe, economical ballast" that "will not damage tires, tubes or rims" and "has the full approval of the tire companies". It provides a helpful chart showing weights and slush vs freezing temps for a 75% fill of various CaCl concentrations. Finally it goes on to say not to fill certain size tires with water or the tires will be damaged. The list of tires includes all the turf tire and front tire options available for this model.

I have wondered about this wording. As written, Kubota draws a distinction between "liquid weight" vs "water", but was that the intent? If so, then I would surmise the risk of damage is due to potential freezing. Turf tires are wider than the ag versions, so perhaps the sideways expansion due to freezing becomes an issue. In which case, antifreeze would be a suitable and acceptable "liquid weight".

On the other hand, if the intent was to warn against any form of "liquid weight" and not just water, then the issue may be the reduced air space. Turf tires are more flexible in the tread, so as to conform to the ground rather than dig in. The air space within provides the cushion, so perhaps reducing the air space by reducing 75% of the volume with liquid puts greater load on the tire carcass when traversing uneven ground.

Personally, I split the difference. I filled my tires, front and rear, with -40° windshield washer anti-freeze -- but I only filled them to 50%. I do keep them inflated near the top of the range and I always have an implement on the 3ph when using the loader. I find it helps with the stability when unloaded, offsetting the static weight of loader and cab, and have not experienced any problems or signs of tire damage as a result. My rears are original to the tractor, fronts were replaced with ATV tires at the time of the fill. The OEM fronts were never filled, but suffered from heavy cracking anyway.

Your mileage may vary.
 

Freeheeler

Active member

Equipment
b2650 tlb
Aug 16, 2018
370
104
43
Knoxville, TN
Thanks for all the positive responses. I think loaded rear tires are the way to go. Interesting that nobody responded to my question as to why my Kubota manual says not to load turf tires???
I don't have a specific answer other than to say the dealer filled mine, purchased new, and no issues with them at all.
 

FTG-05

Member

Equipment
L4330 w/FEL
Jul 21, 2013
141
12
18
TN
No, because there are many reasons not to. Everything from spreading crap on your soil if you spring a leak, to ruining you pressure gauge, to a rough ride, to complicating tire repairs and tire changes, and the list goes on and on.

If you read the other posts here, you'll find all these have happened to people other than myself.
All those so-called disadvantages are completely trumped by these two words:

Huntsville Hospital.
 

rc51stierhoff

New member

Equipment
B2650, MX6000
Sep 13, 2021
12
1
3
Ohio
The manual for my very similar 26 year-old B7100 manual recommends using liquid weight (water or CaCl solution) in rear tires as a "safe, economical ballast" that "will not damage tires, tubes or rims" and "has the full approval of the tire companies". It provides a helpful chart showing weights and slush vs freezing temps for a 75% fill of various CaCl concentrations. Finally it goes on to say not to fill certain size tires with water or the tires will be damaged. The list of tires includes all the turf tire and front tire options available for this model.

I have wondered about this wording. As written, Kubota draws a distinction between "liquid weight" vs "water", but was that the intent? If so, then I would surmise the risk of damage is due to potential freezing. Turf tires are wider than the ag versions, so perhaps the sideways expansion due to freezing becomes an issue. In which case, antifreeze would be a suitable and acceptable "liquid weight".

On the other hand, if the intent was to warn against any form of "liquid weight" and not just water, then the issue may be the reduced air space. Turf tires are more flexible in the tread, so as to conform to the ground rather than dig in. The air space within provides the cushion, so perhaps reducing the air space by reducing 75% of the volume with liquid puts greater load on the tire carcass when traversing uneven ground.

Personally, I split the difference. I filled my tires, front and rear, with -40° windshield washer anti-freeze -- but I only filled them to 50%. I do keep them inflated near the top of the range and I always have an implement on the 3ph when using the loader. I find it helps with the stability when unloaded, offsetting the static weight of loader and cab, and have not experienced any problems or signs of tire damage as a result. My rears are original to the tractor, fronts were replaced with ATV tires at the time of the fill. The OEM fronts were never filled, but suffered from heavy cracking anyway.

Your mileage may vary.
Good day. I can’t speak for the manufacturer on their wording but cheapest way to weight tires is water….Water freezes…be a horrible ride on f you have a block of ice in about 75% of the tire. In terms of weight, I think your application and intended use is the main consideration. So long as rubber side stays down, your fine…when it is not it’s a problem. Weight in tires help rubber side stay done. Also improves traction. When loader lifted the loader arms and weight in the bucket is like a huge lever. Even slightly uneven ground at the max lift capacity can be dangerous very quickly. Dropping loader immediately helps. In terms of when moving with load elevated think, “As slow as possible as fast as necessary”, if you want to be safe. If too wet out for a tractor with weights is it not also most likely too wet for a tractor without weights? When it comes to safety think about others that might also use…spouse or child? Maybe you have experience and mindset to drop a load if it gets tippy, do the other users?
 

krakenacres

New member

Equipment
1985 Kubota L225 w/ bush hog front loader
Jul 11, 2021
7
0
1
Parma Twp MI
Thanks for all the positive responses. I think loaded rear tires are the way to go. Interesting that nobody responded to my question as to why my Kubota manual says not to load turf tires???
I believe it’s because the beet juice will cause the tires to expand width wise just a bit. That’s what happened when I bought new R4’s and loaded them with beet juice. The tires expanded and made contact with the frame. I ordered 2 - 2” spacers from Bro-Tec and that solved the problem and made it more stable. That’s why I think Kubota recommends against it…I could be wrong.