Stingy on fuel

top gnome

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b2301 w bh fel grapple back blade
Dec 12, 2021
309
121
43
Fundy shore nova scotia
I would think a B could pull a single bottom plow I have never tried. An 8n can pull the heck out of of a 2 bottom had and used one for years. same hp but the bigger wheels and extra weight mean a lot.
 
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RalphVa

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Jan 19, 2020
578
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Charlottesville
Now 18 gallons at 46.5, completely full: 0.39 gph or 0.015 gph/engine hp. Running closer to 0.5 gph now though the last 2 fills. That's about what the 18.5 hp JD 4010 ran over 660 hours.
 

Jhilde

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B2650
Apr 26, 2021
32
27
18
Saskatchewan
Years ago I worked at a golf course mowing greens. I had a little Jacobsen greens mower with a tiny Kubota diesel in it. It would take about three hours to get through the course and the boss wanted it full of fuel after every shift. I always had a chuckle because it only took about two liters to fill.
 
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Old_Paint

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LX2610HSDSU, LA535 FEL w/54" bucket, LandPride BB1248, Woodland Mills WC-68
Dec 5, 2020
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AL
I ran my WC68 chipper 4 solid hours a few days ago. And I was FEEDING it like a hungry baby. If it wasn't chipping, something was on the way. Some of it was up to 5 inches in diameter. I doubt I used a gallon of diesel. It wasn't enough to turn off the top bar on the fuel gauge on the display. These things are VERY efficient. I'd have used at least 4 gallons of gasoline with a 6.5 HP 3" chipper and would have been out there 2-3 days grinding up the pile of stuff that I took out in 4 hours. There was at least 2 cubic yards of chips/mulch when I finished. I think I just bought my 5th can of fuel (5 gallons) and have nearly 200 hours on the machine. I tend to use a little more when I'm digging out the stumps from all the brush I've cut but having the weight and torque of the tractor sure beats the heck out of a comealong, pickaxe, shovel, chainsaw, and an axe. Gotta cut a way across the 2nd wash across my property today.
 
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imnukensc

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BX2380
Sep 10, 2015
393
260
63
Midlands of SC
For you guys that are obsessed with a tenth of a gallon per hour:
 
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Flintknapper

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L2350DT
May 3, 2022
344
406
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Deep East Texas
The way I read your post…. I only saw you placed a Value or Price on the topic.

I was adding the LABOR also required to maintain a horse. Then there are Vet bills. Farrier bills. (and the time spent attending those appointments) Mucking out the stalls. Harness and Tack.

Tractors are definitely easier and cheaper. (And according to the latest motor-oil debate, Tractors also can Love.… so horses don’t have any advantages I can think of.)
Horses can make more horses. ;)
 

RalphVa

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Jan 19, 2020
578
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Charlottesville
I'm up to 22 gallons at 55.7 hours, completely full except for about a cup full. That's almost spot on 0.4 gph or 2.5 hours/gallon. That's fully 1/3 less than the 3 JDs used. Doesn't even blacken the back of the FEL like they did.
 
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RBsingl

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Kubota F 2690 72" rear discharge deck, Deere 955
Jul 1, 2022
194
164
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Central IL
There is a decent comparison chart here of the BSFC of several different types of engines. Not surprisingly, the huge very low speed long stroke marine going diesels are near the top of the efficiency class surpassed only by two stage gas turbines that extract as much heat energy as possible from the fuel. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake-specific_fuel_consumption

Small diesel engines took an overall efficiency hit from Tier IV emissions equipment when a DPF is required, both in terms of fuel needed for regen and for the additional exhaust restriction imposed by the DPF. This has been offset to some extent by the more precise injection control and higher injection (thus better atomization) brought about through high pressure common rail systems with electronic control of the injectors. DEF is a bit of a bother but it does help with Tier IV fuel efficiency because it allows more NOx to be generated during the combustion cycle that is then cleaned up via the SCR system. Prior to DEF/SCR systems, NOx was reduced via controlling peak combustion pressure via EGR and reduction of compression ratio and boost level.

I have been pleasantly surprised by the low fuel consumption of the 3.3L Mitsubishi turbo diesel powering my standby generator. I did install it just before Tier IV required DPF and DEF for this size of standby generator.

A diesel engine needs to run under enough load to avoid "wet stacking" but it tends to remain far more efficient at reduced power levels compared to a gas engine running at reduced power, especially in a fixed RPM environment.

GM uses AFM (active fuel management) on most of their gas powered vehicles and it attempts to improve fuel efficiency at lower power levels by leaving the intake and exhaust valves closed on some of the cylinders during AFM operation. This reduces the amount of power normally required to pull intake air through a mostly closed throttle plate reducing the pumping loss of the engine when running at low power. This closed throttle plate is how gas engines provide engine braking, similar to the work we would face in trying to inhale when pinching our nostrils mostly shut.

The benefits are minimal in many situations, especially compared to the complexity and weight added by the AFM system but it can provide some gain under the right conditions. Prior to Tier IV, most diesel engines had a very free flowing intake and exhaust but the DPF imposes a substantial exhaust restriction and many DPF equipped engines now have a throttle plate to help create exhaust heat during DPF regen.

Rodger
 
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RalphVa

Active member
Jan 19, 2020
578
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Charlottesville
Think the biggest problem with DPF is the extra fuel needed to ignite it when doing a burn off. Dropped the fuel efficiency on VW TDIs to not much better than our current Mazda3. TDI did 40 mpg overall. The 3 does 35.
 

RBsingl

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Equipment
Kubota F 2690 72" rear discharge deck, Deere 955
Jul 1, 2022
194
164
43
Central IL
Think the biggest problem with DPF is the extra fuel needed to ignite it when doing a burn off. Dropped the fuel efficiency on VW TDIs to not much better than our current Mazda3. TDI did 40 mpg overall. The 3 does 35.
The additional fuel used during active regeneration is very noticeable but Tier IV hurts in other ways with vehicles. My 2018 GMC 2500HD is rated for 10,000 pounds GVWR, 800 more than my previous 2006 GMC 2500HD but they had almost identical payload ratings with most of the 800 eaten up by the weight of the DPF, DEF, and supporting systems. There is also a penalty, particularly when higher power is being developed, due to the increased back pressure from the DPF even when it is fresh from a regen.

The switch to gas direct injection with most current gas engines has done a lot for car and truck operating efficiency. My Cadillac ATS and Camaro RS are both equipped with GM's 3.6L V6 with 11.5:1 compression ratio engine which are designed to use regular 87 octane fuel. Both have consistently provided a combined MPG avg in the 27.5-27.9 range and both return over 30 MPG in 80 MPH interstate driving. I am very happy with that level of operating economy from a 335 HP engine that runs on regular fuel. I don't put a lot of miles on my 2016 Corvette Z06 (also gas direct injection) and it definitely isn't fuel stingy but it will stay around 27 MPG in high speed interstate driving. It requires 93 octane minimum for its 650 HP supercharged V8 so I don't drive it if I feel like being cheap :)

Rodger
 

GeoHorn

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M4700DT, LA1002FEL, Ferguson5-8B Compactor-Roller, 10KDumpTrailer, RTV-X900
May 18, 2018
3,600
1,431
113
Texas
Horses can make more horses. ;)
Continuing in our tradition…;)…that would mean MORE vet bills, farrier bills, mucking out stalls…..(besides…I’ve already GOT more tractors…).. :ROFLMAO:
 
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Dieseldonato

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B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
695
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Pa
There is a decent comparison chart here of the BSFC of several different types of engines. Not surprisingly, the huge very low speed long stroke marine going diesels are near the top of the efficiency class surpassed only by two stage gas turbines that extract as much heat energy as possible from the fuel. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake-specific_fuel_consumption

Small diesel engines took an overall efficiency hit from Tier IV emissions equipment when a DPF is required, both in terms of fuel needed for regen and for the additional exhaust restriction imposed by the DPF. This has been offset to some extent by the more precise injection control and higher injection (thus better atomization) brought about through high pressure common rail systems with electronic control of the injectors. DEF is a bit of a bother but it does help with Tier IV fuel efficiency because it allows more NOx to be generated during the combustion cycle that is then cleaned up via the SCR system. Prior to DEF/SCR systems, NOx was reduced via controlling peak combustion pressure via EGR and reduction of compression ratio and boost level.

I have been pleasantly surprised by the low fuel consumption of the 3.3L Mitsubishi turbo diesel powering my standby generator. I did install it just before Tier IV required DPF and DEF for this size of standby generator.

A diesel engine needs to run under enough load to avoid "wet stacking" but it tends to remain far more efficient at reduced power levels compared to a gas engine running at reduced power, especially in a fixed RPM environment.

GM uses AFM (active fuel management) on most of their gas powered vehicles and it attempts to improve fuel efficiency at lower power levels by leaving the intake and exhaust valves closed on some of the cylinders during AFM operation. This reduces the amount of power normally required to pull intake air through a mostly closed throttle plate reducing the pumping loss of the engine when running at low power. This closed throttle plate is how gas engines provide engine braking, similar to the work we would face in trying to inhale when pinching our nostrils mostly shut.

The benefits are minimal in many situations, especially compared to the complexity and weight added by the AFM system but it can provide some gain under the right conditions. Prior to Tier IV, most diesel engines had a very free flowing intake and exhaust but the DPF imposes a substantial exhaust restriction and many DPF equipped engines now have a throttle plate to help create exhaust heat during DPF regen.

Rodger
Right on. Some of the best engines I ever worked on were Isuzu tier 3, common rail fuel system. They used egr, but it was a "light" egr system. Tier 4 the fuel consumption went up considerably with the addition of the dpf/doc system.
 
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