Snow blower skids?

MontanaBoz

New member

Equipment
B2650, B2782b
Oct 28, 2019
12
0
1
Bozeman, Montana
I have a B2650 front end snow blower for my Kubota tractor. Are the skids or shoes required for operation or can they be taken off for a paved driveway? Thanks!
 

ve9aa

Well-known member

Equipment
tg1860, bx2380
Apr 11, 2021
639
405
63
NB, Canada
Why in Heavens name would you want to run a snowblower w/o skid shoes on it?
All you're going to do is wear out multiple parts of your blower that are not supposed to touch pavement.
 

MontanaBoz

New member

Equipment
B2650, B2782b
Oct 28, 2019
12
0
1
Bozeman, Montana
Why in Heavens name would you want to run a snowblower w/o skid shoes on it?
All you're going to do is wear out multiple parts of your blower that are not supposed to touch pavement.
That’s why I’m asking. Wouldn’t just the bottom of the blower be touching the ground and it’s not supposed to?
 

ve9aa

Well-known member

Equipment
tg1860, bx2380
Apr 11, 2021
639
405
63
NB, Canada
I don't know your specific blower, so am not an authority...but I've been pushing a snowblower for 40yrs or so. If I took the skids off, I'd never be able to get it up the driveway as everything down low would dig in. (walk behinds)

On my Kubota BX2830 blower that's mounted to my BX2380 tractor (which must be similar to yours, at least) I would just dig the cutting edge into the dirt gravel driveway and likely prevent the whole machine from moving.

Yes, asphalt may be easier but pushing the cutting edge along at an agressive angle is going to wear that edge (hard!), wear the sides of your chute, not to mention leave ugly scars on your driveway....I am thinking.

That's why there are skids/shoes. To give the 300lb (or whatever) beast something to ride on.

At least, that;'s my take on it it all.
 

MontanaBoz

New member

Equipment
B2650, B2782b
Oct 28, 2019
12
0
1
Bozeman, Montana
I don't know your specific blower, so am not an authority...but I've been pushing a snowblower for 40yrs or so. If I took the skids off, I'd never be able to get it up the driveway as everything down low would dig in. (walk behinds)

On my Kubota BX2830 blower that's mounted to my BX2380 tractor (which must be similar to yours, at least) I would just dig the cutting edge into the dirt gravel driveway and likely prevent the whole machine from moving.

Yes, asphalt may be easier but pushing the cutting edge along at an agressive angle is going to wear that edge (hard!), wear the sides of your chute, not to mention leave ugly scars on your driveway....I am thinking.

That's why there are skids/shoes. To give the 300lb (or whatever) beast something to ride on.

At least, that;'s my take on it it all.
Thanks. That’s what I figured just wasn’t 100%. The shoes have 3 levels so I can keep them at the lowest one. Cheers.
 

ve9aa

Well-known member

Equipment
tg1860, bx2380
Apr 11, 2021
639
405
63
NB, Canada
THis is all just supposition on my part you understand.
I have taken the skids off, or lowered them too low, on most of my walk-behinds, and it was ugly.

I am unlucky enough to have a gravel driveway, so I have the pleasure of raising and lowering the skids twice every winter (until I get a hard base and once I get a hard base) on the Kubota blower.

I would never take the skids off entirely.

I am sure someone has---and they'll give you a more authoritative answer.

Cheers from the snowbelt !
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
2,723
1,770
113
North East
If your snowblower rides on the side shoes (some call them skids) and they should be level with the snowblower, not tilted up or down. They protect the side sheet metal of the snowblower from wearing out, and at the bottom edge of the snowblower is the cutting edge. That is what protects the rear of the snowblower case from wearing out. Some of the older snowblowers used rear-mounted shoes that held the bottom off of the surface being cleaned. The next generation went to side-mounted shoes and they are far superior to rear-mounted shoes. Eventually, you will need to replace both shoes no matter where they are mounted, along with the cutting edge, but your basic snowblower case will still be intact and with proper care will give you service for decades to come. If you don't pay attention to these worn items, you will eventually ruin your snowblower's case and have to either replace the case (extremely expensive and labor-intensive) or buy a new snowblower.
I took the liberty of looking up your snowblower, and from the picture, it appears that your shoes are located on the rear of the snowblower, and are adjustable up and down by loosening the bolts. I had those types of shoes on my old snowblower and they wore out quickly. I had to replace them a few times over the years along with the cutting edge. I suggest that you consider purchasing the newer type of shoes that mount on the sides of the snowblower. This will require you to drill new mounting holes. The good news is that today you have a greater choice of types of shoes for your snowblower.
 

MontanaBoz

New member

Equipment
B2650, B2782b
Oct 28, 2019
12
0
1
Bozeman, Montana
If your snowblower rides on the side shoes (some call them skids) and they should be level with the snowblower, not tilted up or down. They protect the side sheet metal of the snowblower from wearing out, and at the bottom edge of the snowblower is the cutting edge. That is what protects the rear of the snowblower case from wearing out. Some of the older snowblowers used rear-mounted shoes that held the bottom off of the surface being cleaned. The next generation went to side-mounted shoes and they are far superior to rear-mounted shoes. Eventually, you will need to replace both shoes no matter where they are mounted, along with the cutting edge, but your basic snowblower case will still be intact and with proper care will give you service for decades to come. If you don't pay attention to these worn items, you will eventually ruin your snowblower's case and have to either replace the case (extremely expensive and labor-intensive) or buy a new snowblower.
I took the liberty of looking up your snowblower, and from the picture, it appears that your shoes are located on the rear of the snowblower, and are adjustable up and down by loosening the bolts. I had those types of shoes on my old snowblower and they wore out quickly. I had to replace them a few times over the years along with the cutting edge. I suggest that you consider purchasing the newer type of shoes that mount on the sides of the snowblower. This will require you to drill new mounting holes. The good news is that today you have a greater choice of types of shoes for your snowblower.
Thanks!!!

t
 

kubotasam

Well-known member

Equipment
B2410, B7100dt, B7500,Woods BH750,Landpride 2660RFM, Tiller, B2781 Snowblower
Apr 26, 2010
1,172
100
63
Alfred Maine
I have a B2650 front end snow blower for my Kubota tractor. Are the skids or shoes required for operation or can they be taken off for a paved driveway? Thanks!
I run my snowblower without skids on a paved driveway. I have done his for many years. The snowblower has a replaceable cutting edge on the bottom that will wear some due to the contact with the pavement. I typically get 2 to 3 years out of a cutting edge and I have a lot of area to clear. I don't want the shoes that lift the blower up because I want the driveway and parking lot scraped clean as I can get it. My tar is old but I see no damage from this. I also have a pickup with a steel cutting edge plow that I use sometimes. I did this on my B2650 and a B2781 and now on my B2682.