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Tooljunkie

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
L1501,home built carry all, mini plow blade.
May 13, 2014
4,146
18
38
57
Lac Du Bonnet, Manitoba,Canada
Used my lathe today, had to bore out a pilot bushing for my neighbour. Supplier provided a high performance crank, but had no clue what was needed for a bushing or bearing.
 

Yooper

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
3901 LA525
May 31, 2015
1,094
56
48
NE Wisconsin
Some of my welding equipment:
1) Miller XMT 304 with D-54 feeder and Torit air cleaner
2) Miller 180 Tig
3) Stronghand weld tables
4) Miller 250 that I have stainless flux core in that works with straight Co2. Used it to rebuild my dump trailer after a pine tree broke off in a wind storm and landed straight across the bed.
 

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Yooper

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
3901 LA525
May 31, 2015
1,094
56
48
NE Wisconsin
Got a little sidetracked from my wood grapple build when I spotted this arbor press on craigslist. I've had one of these on my radar screen for awhile, so I was happy to drive a couple of hours to go get it. It is a Famco 4R, six ton press. Naturally, had to strip it down and blast and powder coat it. The original pilot wheel had cracks in four of the six spokes, so I decided to design my own. Had it water jetted out of one inch thick steel and then I machined it to fit. Just love this 'Good Old' American Iron'. Broaching key ways just got a lot easier!
 

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Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
Picked up a Baldor alox/diamond tool grinder recently. (Model 532, 1/2HP, 208V 3PH)
It had some vibration, and the alox wheel had some runout, & appeared that dressing would take care of the problem. As it turned out, someone had previously been in it, and had somehow moved the bearing on one end so that it was not seated in the end cap, and the wheel mounting flange was not properly seated on the rotor shaft. After trying for 2+weeks to get tech support from Baldor, (the worst customer service I've EVER experienced) I gave up trying to put it back stock & decided to make it better than factory new.
First, I recut the mangled centers on the rotor.
 

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Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
The factory setup uses a double row bearing on the diamond end, and a narrow single row bearing on the alox end. (why?)
I recut the rotor shaft to allow for a wider, double row bearing on both ends.
Then I re-faced the ends of the bearing retainers, (yellow arrow) which become the mounting surfaces for the wheel flanges.
I made an expanding arbor & re-faced the front & back of the wheel mounting flanges.
I next made a balancing jig & balanced the grinding wheels by drilling holes in the wheel backing.
 

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Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
Grinder assembled, and the stand.
The previous owner made a caster wheel base for it, but the 1 1/2" wheels were just too small, so I used a piece of recycled/repurposed 1" aluminum plate for a new base with 2 3/4" wheels.
Last pic shows the single point diamond dresser I built to true up the alox wheel.
 

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Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
The water pot was badly corroded, (cast aluminum) so after power wire brushing it clean, I painted the inside with automotive under coating.
The work light & it's mount.
Final pic is the wee little miter gauge I just picked up for it today.

The grinder now passes the "nickel test"- a nickel will stand on edge, on top of the motor while the grinder is running, without falling off.:eek::D

A side note:
The guy I bought the grinder from has a small garage shop & wanted to see my shop. When he came over, I showed him all the problems with the grinder & what I was going to have to do to make it right, & he felt so bad that he voluntarily refunded $120 of the purchase price- a real stand-up guy.
 

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Yooper

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
3901 LA525
May 31, 2015
1,094
56
48
NE Wisconsin
Wow! That is a great find! And I am guessing you really had a lot of fun making it right. I always had great respect for Baldor motors, so I am disappointed to hear about their support.

On the subject of bearings, I built a grinder for my Dad to use on his lathe. I used two single row bearings together with a shim between the outer races to take up the end play. Took some testing to get it just right as you had to watch for overheating the bearings, but it worked very well. IIRC, it was two or three shims cut out of paper that made the sweet spot, about .007 of an inch.

Going to sharpen some carbide tooling with your new toy?
 
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Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
Going to sharpen some carbide tooling with your new toy?
Yup! Before I retired, I'd just take any carbide tooling in to my shop at work and sharpen or fabricate special tools there. But after 8+ years of no access, I've got a lot of tooling that needs a touch up. Plus, I need a large full radius lathe tool for an upcoming project, (more on that later) and using this will be a lot easier than completely freehand on my pedestal grinder.
I love the white friable alox wheels for grinding tool steel, very little heating, and fine finish. I'm going to love this thing, but it's getting crowded in the shop.

To handle the end play in mine, I left a small gap at the bottom of the bearing pocket in the motor end cap & used a wave washer to take all the play out.
 

AndyM

Member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX25DTLB
Sep 21, 2016
328
22
18
Vancouver Island Canada
So if you obvious experts can think WAAAAY back to when you were just starting to learn your craft, with the knowledge you have today, what would be your first piece of metal working equipment? I have basic shop tools covered (drill press, small mig welder (Miller 180) and so on) but no metal machining tools.

It's a little late in life to get into it in a big way but I would like to have a basic capability. I would appreciate your suggestions. (I understand it's false economy to buy the cheapest but I also doubt I need the very best).

Cheers
Andy
 

Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
what would be your first piece of metal working equipment?
That's easy- a metal lathe. It will do a wide variety of machining jobs without the need of tons of accessories & tooling. Cheap stuff like Harbor Freight or the like is useable, (if you don't expect too much) but most will agree that a used American made oldie (like Craftsman, Atlas, South Bend) will out perform a new Chinese cheapie. It's a matter of what you can afford, and what is available.
I have always said that a small, crummy lathe is better than no lathe at all.
 

AndyM

Member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX25DTLB
Sep 21, 2016
328
22
18
Vancouver Island Canada
Thanks Lil Foot

Is there some models or sizes you think are good to look for? I always regret buying too small but I am not sure what size wouldn't be easily outgrown. Is it driven by bed size, power, available accessories or something else?

I have a feel for this stuff in woodworking tools but not here.
 

Tooljunkie

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
L1501,home built carry all, mini plow blade.
May 13, 2014
4,146
18
38
57
Lac Du Bonnet, Manitoba,Canada
I really like my southbend. 9”x48”
Came with taper attatchment and
Toolpost grinder.
Very handy for one-offs...
My favorite tool so far.
 

Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
My Dad & I co-owned a 10"x 30" Atlas that was quite versatile, even had a milling attachment. (1st pic)
I used to own a Sherline 3"x 10" jeweler's lathe, (useless for all but tiny stuff) (2nd pic)
For years owned an Enco 9"x 20" lathe, which made most of the parts I've fabricated for my Kubota. (3rd pic)
I now own a 12"x 36" Birmingham.(4th pic)
 

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Yooper

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
3901 LA525
May 31, 2015
1,094
56
48
NE Wisconsin
I agree that a small lathe is the best place to start. This is a picture of my 12 x 36 Craftsman that I bought used over thirty years ago. Still use it today even though I have two other bigger lathes. One thing to keep in mind when looking at lathes is what tooling comes with it. Don't overlook this! Stuff like drill chucks and live centers and boring bars etc. can add up quickly. Sometimes a used lathe with a lot of tooling is a better deal than a new one without it. Of coarse, condition of a used one is everything.
 

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AndyM

Member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX25DTLB
Sep 21, 2016
328
22
18
Vancouver Island Canada
Lil Foot, Yooper and Tooljunkie

Thank you all for the advice. I will be on the lookout for the type of lathe you have recommended.

Cheers
Andy
 

skeets

Well-known member

Equipment
BX 2360 /B2601
Oct 2, 2009
12,075
882
113
SW Pa
Tubalcain, hmmmmm :rolleyes:
Youz guys gots some pretty neat stuff,,
I have to say the guys that have and know how to use this equipment just impress the snot out of me, you guys are magic
 

Lil Foot

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
1979 B7100DT Gear
May 19, 2011
5,804
734
113
Peoria, AZ
Abom79. Not a lot of beginner type stuff, but he is the king of 4 jaw chuck use.
He works at his grandfather's/father's shop, and has a home shop that makes all of ours combined seem pitiful. He does a lot of varied jobs, and lots of really large stuff.
Keith Fenner is also pretty good. Does a lot of repairs & straightening of shafts & such.