newbe initial review of yeswelder mig-205ds using 110v flux core (picture rich)

dan_m

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Jul 9, 2020
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As requested - this is my initial review of the yeswelder mig-205ds (green) using 110v power using flux core wire (yeswelder E71TGS.030-inch flux core wire).

Background - very new self teaching welder, the only other welder I've used is a harbor freight 90a flux core (probably dozen years old). Take this review for what it is, the thoughts of a newbe who knows little to nothing about welding - your mileage my vary.

I had 2 left over scraps of 1/4" steel plate that I used for a project and previously used for test welder settings (HF welder has min/max setting and dial for wire feed so I used these to get settings dialed in for my welding style and were all spattered up). The test was the weld these two pieces together (butt weld) on both top and bottom then use my chop saw to cut through the middle of the weld to see how it looked. I used 110V and max thickness / voltage setting. Due to limitation of the welder, the wire setting was 0.035 (only option available for flux core). Keep in mind, 1/4" thickness is larger than the max thickness setting for 110V. Also note even though the top/bottom of the pieces look rough (spatter) the butt joint where I welded was nice clean, shiny metal.

These first 2 pictures are the 2 pieces I welded together and cut though, showing both sides of the butt weld - note one side has a better looking weld than the other and notice the spatter from the HF welder all over. the first picture has the worse weld of the two sides while the 2nd picture has the better looking weld.

side1.jpg


side2.jpg




these next 2 pictures show the inside of both sides of the welds that I cut though using the chop saw. Note there is a little "crack" in the middle where the 2 pieces didn't fuse together completely. Otherwise, it looks like decent penetration and fusion of the two pieces.

middle1.jpg


middle2.jpg


The next 2 pictures are of ends of the butt weld (start and stop of the weld) .
The first picture shows where I had better bead and the weld penetrated/fused better.
start.jpg


This picture shows the other end of the bead (finish) where I didn't get the bead close enough to the end of the pieces to complete the butt weld. You can see some penetration, though not as much as the above picture. Had I gotten the welder closer to end of the pieces, I think It would have had better penetration and look more like the above picture. This is just due to my lack of experience I think.

finish.jpg


Final thoughts :
This welder is exponentially better than the old HF welder.

I'm highly impressed with the weld quality given my very limited knowledge and experience (haven't even ran a complete 2lb spool of wire yet).

I'm not sure if it was all due to welder or the quality of the wire (or both), but the slag chipped away pretty much completely using the yeswelder/yewelder wire - no wire brush nor sanding involved in the above pictures. And there was little to no spatter with this setup as compared to the HF welder.

240V Should have no issue with fully penetrating/fusing 1/4" plate which is most likely the max thickness I'll be doing.

I'm eager to try gas welding with this setup as the flux core capability nice.

Yes, the Fan is loud as others have pointed out in their reviews.

Yes the metal is a little flimsy and the door came bent a little from the factory and most likely due to them packing some of the components inside the welder - but doesn't affect it opening/closing.

I took the gas tip off and welded without it, it allows for better visibility of the tip. There is no flux core tip like some welders have.

No plans soon, but I'll try stick welding with this machine one day.

Dan
 
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Yooper

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I would get it hooked up to the higher voltage and get the .035 flux wire. Your welds are ‘cold’ due to the lack of amperage. Spend the money and get it hooked up to gas with hard wire and start practicing with that. Much more forgiving and much more versatile. And always remember that a 4-1/2” grinder is a welder’s best friend. Grind the metal clean and try welding that. I guarantee you will see the difference. Good luck and keep us posted.
 
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dan_m

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Jul 9, 2020
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Georgia
I would get it hooked up to the higher voltage and get the .035 flux wire. Your welds are ‘cold’ due to the lack of amperage. Spend the money and get it hooked up to gas with hard wire and start practicing with that. Much more forgiving and much more versatile. And always remember that a 4-1/2” grinder is a welder’s best friend. Grind the metal clean and try welding that. I guarantee you will see the difference. Good luck and keep us posted.
I already ordered some 0.035. I thought i ordered that but clicked wrong and got 0.030. It'll come in handy for some smaller projects I want to do/try.

I will get gas after I get the 240V installed. No immediate plans for that, but will come in time. For now, my work is outside so gas is a no go anyway.

I am a better grinder than I am a welder. :) I have 2 grinders and a dremel for the tight spots.

What makes you think the weld is cold? Trying to educate myself to become better.

I know i'm using smaller wire and larger metal than I should - it was all the scrap I had. It wasn't cleaned fully but the area where I welded was. picture 1 is a bad weld - all on me. picture 2 is a better looking weld - need more experience going end-to-end from start and finish the weld as illustrated with picture 5 and 6 (especially 6 - didn't fully weld the lenth of the pieces).
Pictures 3 and 4 show the middle of the weld and looks really good. I understand the center crack isn't good but I'm exceeding the capabilities of 110V with 0.030 wire on 1/4" plate and i expected some lack of penetration / fusion but was curious on the max capabilites of the welder using what I had on hand - 0.030 wire on 110v with the thickest scrap I had, 1/4".


I think with this setup, I'll able to do 3/16". I don't plan on welding anything over that until I go 240V.

Dan
 

PoTreeBoy

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Thanks for the report. Looks like the Yeswelder has higher output than my old Craftsman 110v flux welder.

One possible reason for the 'crack' in the middle - when welding from both sides a double v-groove is usually used. One side is welded, then the groove in the other side is ground out to remove slag to prevent it leaving inclusions in the second weld.

When welding at the limit of your machine, preheat. You probably noticed some difference as you approached the end of the weld. This is due to heat building up as you welded. Preheat, even with a propane torch, can help when you're at your machine's limit.

Your HF rig may be outputting AC. Some genius decided that by leaving out the diodes and capacitors, they could build cheaper welders. FCAW was never intended to be AC. So you get even more spatter than with DC.
 

dan_m

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Jul 9, 2020
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Thanks for the report. Looks like the Yeswelder has higher output than my old Craftsman 110v flux welder.

One possible reason for the 'crack' in the middle - when welding from both sides a double v-groove is usually used. One side is welded, then the groove in the other side is ground out to remove slag to prevent it leaving inclusions in the second weld.

When welding at the limit of your machine, preheat. You probably noticed some difference as you approached the end of the weld. This is due to heat building up as you welded. Preheat, even with a propane torch, can help when you're at your machine's limit.

Your HF rig may be outputting AC. Some genius decided that by leaving out the diodes and capacitors, they could build cheaper welders. FCAW was never intended to be AC. So you get even more spatter than with DC.
Good points about the groove and pre-heating (I like the bernzomatic TS800 over the TS4000 for flame control). When I built the tie down points for my tractor, I did bevel the edge on the vertical pieces and did multiple passes. I wasn't concerned with making this a solid/perfect weld, just doing a quick (not thorough) test of the capabilities and comparing it to my current cheap welder using the materials I had on hand. In another post, I was asked to provide a review so thought this was a good way to show the capabilities, and limits, of the yeswelder the quick, easy and lazy way.

There are things that can make this an even better budget welder - grinding/groove/bevel the joints, pre-heat metals, correct wire size for thickness of metal, switching to 240v to up the amps, switching to gas.

The HF welder is AC, there are many videos on youtube to convert it to dc. I may try that - because why not? If it works, it can become my dedicated flux welder and the yeswelder can be a dedicated gas/240v welder.

Next up, practicing on thinner metal, as that'll be the majority of my welding.

Thanks to all for feedback.

Dan
 
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Yooper

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The crack across the weld bead in picture #2 pretty much confirms the cold weld. What you want to see is ‘feathering’ along the edge of the weld where the bead meets the base metal. Your weld speed looks very good. I think if you dropped down to .035 flux you will see the difference. Keep practicing!
 

dan_m

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BX2380
Jul 9, 2020
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Georgia
The crack across the weld bead in picture #2 pretty much confirms the cold weld. What you want to see is ‘feathering’ along the edge of the weld where the bead meets the base metal. Your weld speed looks very good. I think if you dropped down to .035 flux you will see the difference. Keep practicing!
Not sure I follow completely.

Pictures 1 and 2 are both taken after I cut across the bead to take a look at the inside (penetration/fusion). I should have taken pictures of the beads before cutting, but didn't think about it until after the fact - so I laid the already cut pieces close together to get a picture of the bead.

Pictures 3 and 4 show the inside of the bead on both pieces after cutting across the bead. The crack in both pictures is the joint between the 2 pieces and I suspected that would happen that since I was using 110v with 0.030 wire and exceeding the recommended thickness and didn't groove/bevel before welding.

Pictures 5 and 6 shows the start/end of the welds to show the penetration/fusion from that view point.

I'm enjoying learning and do need much more practice!

Thanks for the encouragement!

Dan