Lug nut reminder

Captain13

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M7040 4WD ROPS, ZD28, Woods (84” box blade, 72” harrow, 48” pallet forks)
Feb 27, 2019
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Kathleen, GA
I always check my lug nuts when I lube my tractor. Yesterday, I was trying out a new impact wrench and found that several of my rear lug nuts were not tight. Both sides of the tractor had several loose lug nuts. Fortunatel, several were tight and no damage was done. So, I thought I would just remind you guys since I haven’t removed the wheels in quite a while and was very surprised at how some of the nuts were not tight.
 
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DustyRusty

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BX23S
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That is why you should use a torque wrench on the lug nuts when you install the tire and rim and check them after you use the tractor for a few hours. The same goes for your car. I don't use an impact wrench for tightening fasteners, just for taking them off and putting them on securely, but finish the tightening process with the proper tool to know exactly how tight they are, and that all are equal.
 
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NCL4701

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I check the torque on mine every 50 hours. It was at 200 hours first time none of them moved when checked/tightened with a torque wrench. I found that a bit surprising but agree checking torque is a needed item on routine maintenance list.
 

kubotafreak

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Lug nuts(disk too), and the loader mount bolts have a way of needing to be checked often. Like Dustyrusty pointed out, too tight can be just as bad as well.
 

Henro

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That is why you should use a torque wrench on the lug nuts when you install the tire and rim and check them after you use the tractor for a few hours. The same goes for your car. I don't use an impact wrench for tightening fasteners, just for taking them off and putting them on securely, but finish the tightening process with the proper tool to know exactly how tight they are, and that all are equal.
This is excellent advice. Would certainly be wise to follow it.

BUT I can say that in almost five decades of buying replacement tires for my vehicles, I never once saw a torque wrench used when putting the wheels back on.

No matter where I bought tires, it was only the impact wrench that was used. I am guilty of doing the same, except when I installed wheel spacers on the BX, I did use a torque wrench because the bolts/nuts that attach the spacers are hidden behind the wheels. Also used blue locktite on those bolts/nuts.

Before the pandemic, after I retired my wife and I used to visit her home town in Japan twice a year for a month. A friend used to pick us up at the airport. One time he had a flat, and called the Japanese version of AAA. Truck arrives and the service guy either fixed the flat or put the spare on, I don't remember which, but he did have a pretty well equipped service vehicle.

The thing that impressed me was when he put the tire on, he actually did use a torque wrench to torque the lug nuts correctly. My thought was: Never saw anyone do that in the USA!
 

Dennis.D

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Feb 16, 2018
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We've been torquing wheel nuts on cars for over 20 years. We also lube the tapered seat especially important on aluminum wheels. I guess it depends on where you go.
 
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Henro

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We've been torquing wheel nuts on cars for over 20 years. We also lube the tapered seat especially important on aluminum wheels. I guess it depends on where you go.
People who do things right are harder and harder to find.

Glad to hear you are one of them!
 

GeoHorn

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Use some “Torque-Seal” to mark your lug nuts after you torque them so as to detect movement. (or use a common felt-tip marker)

 

Pawnee

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L2501
Jul 1, 2021
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Ontario Canada
No matter where I bought tires, it was only the impact wrench that was used.
Impact wrench will almost always overtorque them which they probably won't get blamed for.
Have one come loose though, and they will hear about it.

IMO wheel fasteners need to be torqued once, then checked once again after a short period.
Fasteners that are properly torqued/checked, and then come loose indicate a different problem.
 

Captain13

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M7040 4WD ROPS, ZD28, Woods (84” box blade, 72” harrow, 48” pallet forks)
Feb 27, 2019
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Kathleen, GA
I always use a torque wrench on the tractor and my vehicles. That’s good advice for sure. I initially tighten with the impact set on low so that I don’t have to go much further with the torque wrench. I use my Dewalt Max IR impact set on #1 to run them up and then finish with the torque wrench.
 

D2Cat

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Probably in the 50 years Henro thought the techs were just guessing, some were using these and he didn't realize what they were.

1640732085416.png
 
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DustyRusty

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This is excellent advice. Would certainly be wise to follow it.

BUT I can say that in almost five decades of buying replacement tires for my vehicles, I never once saw a torque wrench used when putting the wheels back on.

No matter where I bought tires, it was only the impact wrench that was used. I am guilty of doing the same, except when I installed wheel spacers on the BX, I did use a torque wrench because the bolts/nuts that attach the spacers are hidden behind the wheels. Also used blue locktite on those bolts/nuts.

Before the pandemic, after I retired my wife and I used to visit her home town in Japan twice a year for a month. A friend used to pick us up at the airport. One time he had a flat, and called the Japanese version of AAA. Truck arrives and the service guy either fixed the flat or put the spare on, I don't remember which, but he did have a pretty well equipped service vehicle.

The thing that impressed me was when he put the tire on, he actually did use a torque wrench to torque the lug nuts correctly. My thought was: Never saw anyone do that in the USA!
The last set of tires I purchased was at Costco, and they still use a torque wrench to set the nuts to the proper torque. It is more important today with alloy rims because you can damage the rim if you over-torque them.
As for the torque sticks, I have seen them around for years, but I don't care for them, because of reliability of accuracy. I had a set and gave them away as a result of having to go back and check with the torque wrench afterward.
On my BX the rims are filled with ballast, and they are just too heavy for this old guy to deal with them. I found that if I use the GoJak wheel dolly to take them off and put them back on.
 

Attachments

DeepWoods

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B2650HSDC Woodland Mills WC68 Wood Chipper
Apr 10, 2019
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Bigfork Minnesota
Ok, I’ll bite, I’m assuming they set the proper torque, but how. Please teach me something I don’t know.
 
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TheOldHokie

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Ok, I’ll bite, I’m assuming they set the proper torque, but how. Please teach me something I don’t know.
Controlled/calibrated torsion. Each stick has a specific torque value associated with it. Once the fastener has reached the target torque the torque stick absorbs the impact of the wrench preventing it from tightening the fastener any further. They work well with pneumatic guns but electrics deliver too many impacts per minute for them to work properly.

Dan
 
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DeepWoods

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B2650HSDC Woodland Mills WC68 Wood Chipper
Apr 10, 2019
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Bigfork Minnesota
Controlled/calibrated torsion. Each stick has a specific torque value associated with it. Once the fastener has reached the target torque the torque stick absorbs the impact of the wrench preventing it from tightening the fastener any further. They work well with pneumatic guns but electrics deliver too many impacts per minute for them to work properly.

Dan
Thank you for the explanation, I’ve always used my torque wrench, first time I’ve ever seen them.
 
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Jchonline

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At 50hrs mine on the M62 were a bit out of torque range. At 70hrs the M7060 had most of the rear lugs out of torque. Both were good at 100 hrs. Definitely should be checking them.
 

GeoHorn

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Discount Tire uses the torque-limiter adaptors on their impacts…but ALWAYS afterwards finishes the installation with a Torque Wrench. Presumably, this use of the limiters prevents the impact from over-torquing the nut…and the torque wrench establishes the specified torque.

Nice policy.

Unfortunately… the techs are not taught the PROPER USE of the Torque Wrench.
What they typically do is apply the torque wrench to the lugnut with excessive FORCE …which naturally MEETS the torque specification…but also EXCEEDS IT. Yes…the wrench will “click” …but it actually OVER-torques the lugnut by their improper technique.
Additionally, they do not support the axial-point (the socket itself) while applying the torque. This causes an INaccurate torque application because it adds radial-friction to the tool.

It meets the policy of always using a torque wrench… it just doesn’t meet the INTENT of the policy.
 

lynnmor

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B2601-1
May 3, 2021
622
424
63
Red Lion
I wonder how many on here have a Ford Super Duty pickup. They have two piece lugnuts that require a drop of oil between the pieces. The part next to the wheel has raised lines that bites preventing rotation, so the torque is between the two parts. I have never seen anyone oil those nuts and get blank stares if I mention it. From the owners manual:

On all two-piece flat wheel nuts,
apply one drop of motor oil between
the flat washer and the nut.
 

RMS

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LX2610HSDC, RCR1260, PFL1242, LX2963, RB1684, WC-68 Chipper,Flail Mower
Sep 26, 2021
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Buckfield Maine
I checked the torque on my lug nuts after the first 5 hours and found that one of the front studs was stripped. Had the dealer come out and replace it. Was told that it was probably due to an overly agressive impact gun during set up.