L4701 vs MX5400

MattN03

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If you don't mind a more manual approach, you can cut those 1" and under pretty easily with a heavy brush saw. I have a Stihl 130r Kombi system with a blade, and it'll cut through stuff like that easily. I did 400'+ of road frontage at my house because the forestry mulching guy wasn't comfortable working that close to a main highway and it was a steep 4' embankment.
 
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NorthwoodsLife

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If you don't mind a more manual approach, you can cut those 1" and under pretty easily with a heavy brush saw. I have a Stihl 130r Kombi system with a blade, and it'll cut through stuff like that easily. I did 400'+ of road frontage at my house because the forestry mulching guy wasn't comfortable working that close to a main highway and it was a steep 4' embankment.
Thanks. That's excellent. Put an essential saw blade on my Stihl string trimmer.

I plan to do that for areas I can't drive a tractor into.

I find it hard to believe that there isn't a tractor implement made for clearing out 1" or less saplings.
 

jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
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I was going by the statement the op made “I'd like to clear out anything 1" dia trunk and smaller in some areas.”
That doesn’t give me the impression he was talking about clearing that land down to dirt Removing everything By that statement. No I don’t think a rotary cutter will take down those full size trees and I don’t think you need to be a forester to size that up.
Viewed by the eye of a forester, that stand needs thinning of lots of trees greater than 1” diameter.
 
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jyoutz

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Viewed by the eye of a forester, that stand needs thinning of lots of trees greater than 1” diameter.
There is cost/share funds available for thinning private forest lands. Talk to your state forestry people.
 

NorthwoodsLife

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There is cost/share funds available for thinning private forest lands. Talk to your state forestry people.
Thank you. I am in contact with DNR and plan to consult with them as necessary.

Which, respectfully, doesn't help my tractor with implement purchase regarding what I should include. I think a rotary cutter is a must. A flail mower is my preference over a rotary though.

Not to take my post off topic anymore. I'll post implement questions elsewhere on this forum.

I'm still undecided regarding L4701 or MX5400. The turbo bugs me because I've had turbo / computer issues with past owned F250's. Therefore my current F250 has a gasoline engine N/A.
The plus side to the MX is I could install a factory Cab later. And it's a big machine. I don't know what classifies what a compact tractor is. But an MX is not what I'd consider a compact.

Edit:. I've never worked on a farm so excuse my ignorance. Owned and operated compact tractors in the past. And frankly, an MX is something else in my eyes.
 
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rc51stierhoff

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One other thing, what's the best implement to knock down saplings in the forest? A flail? Rotary cutter?

I've got acres of this:
View attachment 68989
I have a forested property that is less mature than yours with much denser stands of saplings than you picture. Mx and an rcf27 will easily handle what you have. You can lower deck down and when you are done you could run a tiller if you so desired however the trees I. The picture might have some roots…you’d have that no matter what. But to clear off the Mx would do that easily. Only thing that will stall that machine is some thing you should not be going over. The deck has stump jumpers, how ever it’s possible if you find something big enough. The brush hog is good for it’s designed purpose without question. That one is 3” per land pride and it easy handles that paired with an MX.
 
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jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
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I
Thank you. I am in contact with DNR and plan to consult with them as necessary.

Which, respectfully, doesn't help my tractor with implement purchase regarding what I should include. I think a rotary cutter is a must. A flail mower is my preference over a rotary though.

Not to take my post off topic anymore. I'll post implement questions elsewhere on this forum.

I'm still undecided regarding L4701 or MX5400. The turbo bugs me because I've had turbo / computer issues with past owned F250's. Therefore my current F250 has a gasoline engine N/A.
The plus side to the MX is I could install a factory Cab later. And it's a big machine. I don't know what classifies what a compact tractor is. But an MX is not what I'd consider a compact.

Edit:. I've never worked on a farm so excuse my ignorance. Owned and operated compact tractors in the past. And frankly, an MX is something else in my eyes.
just looked at both models. The exterior dimensions of the MX isn’t much larger than the 4701, but the loader is much beefier with more lift capacity, and the hitch is category 2. The MX is heavier, so that is usually a good thing with tractors in terms of stability and traction. But other than the loader, I think both tractors can perform the same tasks and run the same implements in category 1.
 
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jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
Jan 14, 2019
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Edgewood, New Mexico
I have a forested property that is less mature than yours with much denser stands of saplings than you picture. Mx and an rcf27 will easily handle what you have. You can lower deck down and when you are done you could run a tiller if you so desired however the trees I. The picture might have some roots…you’d have that no matter what. But to clear off the Mx would do that easily. Only thing that will stall that machine is some thing you should not be going over. The deck has stump jumpers, how ever it’s possible if you find something big enough. The brush hog is good for it’s designed purpose without question. That one is 3” per land pride and it easy handles that paired with an MX.
The key point is that this is a mid aged forest, not saplings in an old field. Maneuvering with a tractor in that condition will be difficult to avoid destroying the machine and the forest needs thinning of larger trees than just saplings. The foresters who visit the property will no doubt recommend a thinning of trees up to and greater than 5+ inches in diameter ( maybe larger). This is a forestry project for forestry equipment, not a tractor.
 

jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
Jan 14, 2019
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Edgewood, New Mexico
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Steppenwolfe

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I bought a new MX 5400 gear drive, rops this past spring. I knew I wanted R4's this time around, a tooth bar on the fel, and rear remotes. My old MX 5100 lacked these things. To say I love this tractor does it injustice; this is a GREAT tractor. As far as the saplings go... get the tooth bar, pops them out of the ground like weeds.
nt.jpg
 
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rc51stierhoff

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These photos look like younger forest conditions than the previous photo. If most of the area is more like this, you may be able to use a rotary cutter and chainsaw thin larger trees.
I’d recommend you drive what ever you are considering and if you have some idea of implements ask dealer to put on the ones in you wonder about visibility. If they have a barn door you can drive in and out all the better. Playing in the woods visibility can be an issue. I can say that the MX has awesome wheel/tire package…however if you plan to run forks there is a visibility issue, at least there is for me with my set up. Before you purchase forks I’d consider the length f the forks to have visibility. Tractors in general have poor visibility for forks….tires are usually in the way…that being said forks are one of most versatile implements. The MX has really tight turning radius for its size…almost unbelievable due to the bevel gears…that being said when you test drive, you want to understand and feel difference from the other models with implements hanging off…if close quarter operations consideration. Reverse is your worse condition to be aware how front end is swinging with forks and in forward a bush hog that hangs off 10ft. Pretend you are trying to hang a hard right through a 10ft door or whatever your barn door size is. It’s the one place you are limited to raise the forks to maneuver. If you can get through and around a door way you’ll be fine in the woods. As fast as necessary and as slow as possible is helpful in a bigger machine. I am happy to answer any question of concern about b series or Mx that I have experience with. Happy shopping.
 
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jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
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Edgewood, New Mexico
I bought a new MX 5400 gear drive, rops this past spring. I knew I wanted R4's this time around, a tooth bar on the fel, and rear remotes. My old MX 5100 lacked these things. To say I love this tractor does it injustice; this is a GREAT tractor. As far as the saplings go... get the tooth bar, pops them out of the ground like weeds. View attachment 69013
I have a toot bar on my current tractor and like it. Where did you get it and how much did it cost for the MX?
 

jyoutz

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MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
Jan 14, 2019
1,032
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Edgewood, New Mexico
I do want to consult my forestry guy because I want the best thing for the forest. I'm not a tree hugger, but want the best for the property and forest. I think getting rid of the small stuff will help the bigger trees. But I honestly don't know. I'm learning. You guys are helping. Thank you.
A local forester with experience in your forest type can collect data and provide you with options based on your management objectives.
 

JimmyJazz

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B2601
Aug 8, 2020
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Pittsburgh, Pa
I put a Piranha tooth bar from BXpanded on the bucket of my B2601 and I could destroy those saplings in short order. Try watching the movie Patton beforehand to put you in the mood. Thats all I have to say.
 
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NCL4701

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L4701, WC68 chipper, grapple, BB1572 box scrape, Howes 500, 16kW IMD gen
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Another question: do you also plow snow on the roads you maintain? It seems like more weight would help when using the blade in an offset position.
We have very little snow here. While I don’t disagree it seems the weight of the MX would be an advantage with the snow plow I can’t directly speak to the performance of the L4701 plowing any accumulation of snow more than about 6”. It does fine with an angled back blade with 6” of snow, but I’m aware that’s not much snow.

Edit: Just saw the wheel width adjustment question/statement. Yes, the L4701 has width adjustable wheels (even with R4’s), same as the MX.
 
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PoTreeBoy

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If you are cutting brush 1-1/2", with occasional 2" or so, a fairly heavy rotary cutter will work. You'll probably want to back in to avoid snagging wires and hoses on your tractor, and even then be on constant alert. Tire punctures are a real possibility. Unloaded tires, low pressure, and R4's should be tougher. Also leave the blades dull and lower your PTO speed. You want to shatter the stems, not cut them clean and sharp.
Up to about 6", I cut with a brush cutter using a 9" blade with carbide chain saw teeth.
What kind of trees are these? If they sprout back from the stump like sweet gums, you're wasting your time if you don't treat the stumps with herbicide.
 
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MattN03

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I find it hard to believe that there isn't a tractor implement made for clearing out 1" or less saplings.
I'd use a heavy duty rotary mower to cut 1" or less saplings. Check out Everything Attachments. They make some of the most heavy duty tractor implements you can buy.

 

mcmxi

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I'm still undecided regarding L4701 or MX5400. The turbo bugs me because I've had turbo / computer issues with past owned F250's. Therefore my current F250 has a gasoline engine N/A.
The plus side to the MX is I could install a factory Cab later. And it's a big machine. I don't know what classifies what a compact tractor is. But an MX is not what I'd consider a compact.

Edit:. I've never worked on a farm so excuse my ignorance. Owned and operated compact tractors in the past. And frankly, an MX is something else in my eyes.
Allowing the engine to cool down to allow the oil lubricating the turbo bearings to cool can greatly extend the life of a turbo. I have thermocouples installed pre and post turbo on my '02 F250 that has 150K miles on the original turbo. I leave the engine running to allow the turbo to cool if pre-turbo temperatures exceed 375F. I let the MX cool down before shutting down if it's been running hard, as the manual suggests. I might add a thermocouple pre turbo to the new tractor so that I'm not idling the engine excessively.

I know how you feel with the size difference of an MX compared to other compact tractors, but let me assure you, you'll get used to it. I had a BX for five years and when I bought the MX back in February it seemed like a monster in comparison, but after switching back and forth for different projects, I soon realized that I wasn't enjoying much about the BX any more and frankly don't miss it all now. The MX is such a capable tractor in so many situations. The MX no longer feels huge but rather just right for what I need. It turns on a dime, it has a lot of power, it fits in relatively tight spots, it's easy to operate, it's not overly complicated and it's very easy to live with. It's kind of a modern take on an old tractor without much in the way of fancy electronics.

I wish I'd bought the cab model from the get go but thought that after 5 years of a BX I don't need to spend the extra money for a cab. I was wrong. The bigger tractor meant a rotary cutter and taking care of 30 acres or more which means DUST and chopped grass, and more dust. These rotary cutters pulverize whatever you're cutting and the dust can be brutal. I was wearing goggles and a dust mask for hours on end and getting covered in all manner of crap. Being itchy and filthy gets old fast. As winter approaches I like the idea of sitting in a cab and blowing snow rather than having the wind send a bunch of snow back in my face. When blowing snow with the BX I would always have to mess with the chute to reduce the chance of getting an ice bath. I can imagine that sitting in a warm cab and moving snow around on a sunny but brutally cold day is the bees knees. I enjoyed it on the BX (mostly) so it's only going to be better with the MX and cab.

As for stability, you can add 600lb of wheel weights to the MX which offsets the weight of the cab. You can also add a rear ballast box if you need more weight.
 
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NorthwoodsLife

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Allowing the engine to cool down to allow the oil lubricating the turbo bearings to cool can greatly extend the life of a turbo. I have thermocouples installed pre and post turbo on my '02 F250 that has 150K miles on the original turbo. I leave the engine running to allow the turbo to cool if pre-turbo temperatures exceed 375F. I let the MX cool down before shutting down if it's been running hard, as the manual suggests. I might add a thermocouple pre turbo to the new tractor so that I'm not idling the engine excessively.

I know how you feel with the size difference of an MX compared to other compact tractors, but let me assure you, you'll get used to it. I had a BX for five years and when I bought the MX back in February it seemed like a monster in comparison, but after switching back and forth for different projects, I soon realized that I wasn't enjoying much about the BX any more and frankly don't miss it all now. The MX is such a capable a tractor in so many situations. The MX no longer feels huge but rather just right for what I need. It turns on a dime, it has a lot of power, it fits in relatively tight spots, it's easy to operate, it's not overly complicated and it's very easy to live with. It's kind of a modern take on an old tractor without much in the way of fancy electronics.

I wish I'd bought the cab model from the get go but thought that after 5 years of a BX I don't need to spend the extra money for a cab. I was wrong. The bigger tractor meant a rotary cutter and taking care of 30 acres or more which means DUST and chopped grass, and more dust. These rotary cutters pulverize whatever you're cutting and the dust can be brutal. I was wearing goggles and a dust mask for hours on end and getting covered in all manner of crap. Being itchy and filthy gets old fast. As winter approaches I like the idea of sitting in a cab and blowing snow rather than having the wind send a bunch of snow back in my face. When blowing snow with the BX I would always have to mess with the chute to reduce the chance of getting an ice bath. I can imagine that sitting in a warm cab and moving snow around on a sunny but brutally cold day is the bees knees. I enjoyed it on the BX (mostly) so it's only going to be better with the MX and cab.

As for stability, you can add 600lb of wheel weights to the MX which offsets the weight of the cab. You can also add a rear ballast box if you need more weight.
Excellent post. You changed all my plans.

Looks like I'll go MX 5400 with a cab. Now to get to ordering it and wait.

My wife says get everything you want and do it once. Good advice.
 
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