Help me decide

soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
Second Update:
Dealer called earlier this week to say they still were waiting on the R14 tires, but were able to make a deal with another dealer to have another B2601 transferred to them that had R14 tires. They swapped tires for me, we went in to sign paperwork and they delivered the tractor this morning!

Update:
Figured I should post a long overdue post. After looking at local dealers and brands I have settled. On a Kubota B2601. Dealer had a B2601 in stock with loader and 60” bucket. I requested to add 3rd function kit, and ordered Land Pride 60” grapple and a pair of pallet forks. I also requested for the R4 tires to be swapped to R14s. Dealer offered what I felt was a reasonable price despite being a little over what I wanted to spend, but SO approved and we made a deal with 0% financing. That was mid February. Now at the beginning of April, the 3rd function kit came in and was installed, both the grapple and pallet forks arrived as well. The only thing the dealer is waiting on is for the R14 tires. Unfortunately they have not come in and they are unsure when they can get them so they are hoping to find some at another local dealer. That’s where we are at as of April 1st.

Original Post:
Hello everyone. I'm new here and figured I'd register as I've narrowed my choice for a new tractor to two colors, Red or Orange. First a bit about my needs and use..

I'm in WNY, close to finger lakes region and have a bit over an acre. On that acre, I've got a good size fenced in garden area with raised beds and a greenhouse. We have about 2/3-3/4 acre fenced in for my dogs to run, and we have chickens. We have many, many trees and unfortunately now, many, many stumps. about 80% of our trees are ash and we have been hit with EAB so nearly all our ash are dead. We have taken down about 65 already and have about 20 left to go. Once we are done, we'll have about 85 stumps to grind. Additionally, I want to do landscaping including prepping for a cement pad, redoing my paver patio, adding another patio, building a nice fire pit, putting in a large in ground garden, snow removal and other various projects around the house.

I know for sure I'll want a grapple so 3rd function is a must. I would like rear remotes to allow the option for things like a stump grinder and hydraulic top link in the future, although I may rent a stump grinder as the prices have really shot up over the last year or so.
I would like to get a dethather, maybe a rake and am willing to go used for that.
Snow removal so maybe a snow pusher, but I'll probably try the bucket first.
I plan to get pallet forks and a stump bucket, but I may not get these initially.

I will probably use this for all sorts of projects around the house. Probably the only thing I plan to add that I'll need to rent something different is to build a koi pond and don't think a backhoe is worth the expense for only one project. I will use the tractor I get for moving stones and landscaping around the pond once the hole is dug.

Anyway, I've looked at the local dealers and brands available to me, MF GC1723 and GC1725, JD 1025r, Kioti CS2510 and CS2520, TYM T264 (I didn't look at in person, but was not impressed with the dealer over the phone or the price), NH Workmaster 25s (I did not go look at LS in person either, but it's the same), Yanmar SA325 and SA424, and Kubota B2601. I know there are a couple other brands that are around, but dealers are not near me.
Out of all the tractors, I think I could get buy with any of them. Each has their own pros and cons, but I think I liked the SA325 and B2601 the best. Both are a little bigger without being to big for my smaller property and I didn't feel like I wouldn't be able to get places with either. I think the Yanmar might have tighter turn radius, although on paper both are similar.
I also liked the MF, Kioti, and JD... but the dealers were not nearly as nice to talk too as the Kubota and Yanmar dealers are so I'm going to focus on these two brands/models for now.

I really liked the lift capacity of the SA325 and it has by far the best warranty. 10 year powertrain and free transportation for warranty work which is fantastic since I don't have a trailer. It also offers more bang/buck than the B2601 at a couple thousand less. The downside is the proprietary QA system so for things like a stump bucket I'd have to go without, fab my own, or opt for a significantly more expensive option like the HLA vs others available for SSQA. I did find the side by side pedals more comfortable, but I also found that I sometimes hit the wrong pedal first so it would take some getting used too.

For the Kubota, I really like the 3 speed hydro, SSQA, and the fact that aftermarket otpions are available all over the place. Everyone sells things for JD and Kubota. I am unsure about the treadle pedal, but my Cub Cadet XT2 lawn tractor has something similar, only much smaller that works well and I don't have any issues. It feels really intuitive and you don't have to think about which is forward or reverse. I suspect I'd have to get used to the Kubota just like I'd have to get used to the side by side pedals. I think the Kubota dealer did edge out the Yanmar dealer and it's closer so this is how I'm leaning, but the price is a bit over what I wanted to spend. (wanted to keep it below $25k).

I know for either I'll need ballast. I haven't decided if I want a ballast box, liquid ballast in the tires or both. The Yanmar Dealer can do Rim Guard for a fee, the Kubota dealer uses Ballast Star citrus based one, but when I look at it I believe it's still calcium chloride so I'd probably skip this one. https://ballaststar.com/products-and-specifications/liquid-tire-ballast-citrastar-50/

Is there anything I should be thinking about or considering I haven't looked at yet?
 
Last edited:

PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
2,048
1,074
113
NZ
I have a B2601. Try out the pedal well, they have a stiff spring that gives me a sore knee after a while. Not a deal breaker, adjusting the seat changes the angle a bit. But worth checking you're OK with it.

I personally wouldn't fill the tires. I'd start with a ballast box or a heavy rear implement and see if that's enough, and only ballast the tires if strictly necessary. Reasons for that are:
  • Ballasted tires don't relieve load on the front axle - weight behind the rear axle acts as a lever or counter balance, transferring weight from the front to the rear. Weight in the tires stops the wheels lifting, but doesn't relieve any load on the front wheels
  • Ballast boxes/implements can be removed when you don't want the weight - on the lawn, or for trailering and such. Weight in the tires is pretty much permanent
  • Ballasted tires are harder to work with for punctures etc
My B2601 has plenty of stability side to side on hills, and with a ballast box plenty of counter weight for the loader. But when I strip it down for mowing it's relatively light and nimble. If you try it out and it's not stable enough for you, you can easily add ballast to the tires later. If you get it it's hard to know if you could live without, and removing it is a pain.

What would you do with branches/tree trimmings? Chip or burn? My chipper is one of my more used implements - a cheap knockoff out of China, but it runs fine. It's a Wallenstein ripoff.

Would a stump grinder be PTO driven or hydraulic? I've never missed rear remotes on my B2601, the one use I would maybe have is for a hydraulic log splitter. Many people have top and tilt, but I don't often do ground engaging tasks that would need those. When I do I typically set the tilt once, and the B is small enough I can reach back over the seat for the tilt if I have to.

You can get two different buckets for the B2601, if you're doing snow work you might want the larger bucket. In theory it's too big for heavy materials like stone, but in reality I think you just fill the bucket 3/4 full (i.e. same size load as in the smaller bucket). It's also easier to fill a large bucket 3/4 full than to fill a small bucket 100% full if you're not super proficient with the loader.

You didn't mention which tires. Turfs might be suitable for what you describe, or R4, or the new R14? Make sure you check price with the tires you want - often they're priced with R1 as they're the cheapest tires, optioning a different tire can change the price.

The Kubota has split brakes, which does help with turn radius if you need it. Not sure on the Yanmar.

The Kubota will likely have much better resale than the Yanmar. I tend to look at my tractor as a loan - I bought it for $33K NZ, it'll sell for $33K when I'm done with it (inflation means a new one might be worth $40K by then, but either way I get my money back). So really you're only out of pocket the opportunity cost on the money. With a Yanmar the resale might mean that isn't true.

Is the real life lift capacity of the Yanmar really greater? Is the bucket bigger (so will it actually lift more), is it measured at the same point to the same height, does the front axle have enough strength to actually take that load? Kubota's tend to be rated reasonably conservatively, and ultimately the B2601 will lift a bucket load of anything I might put in the bucket. More capacity in theory is good, but if you can't fill the bucket any more.....does it matter?
 
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RalphVa

Well-known member
Jan 19, 2020
738
319
63
Charlottesville
I had 3 Yanmar-engined JDs since 2004 and switched to a B2601 in Jan 2022. The B2601 is MUCH better than the JDs except for that reverse treadle. It has gotten better, and you can remove one of the 3 springs on it and make it lighter yet.

Definitely fill the tires. The JDs were all done with windshield wiper fluid. Think the B has calcium chloride in it. I've never used a ballast box. The bush hog or chipper are good counter weights. Back blade is a tad light.

Think you're going too far in wanting the hydraulics on the 3ph. There isn't that much room back there for the cylinders and hoses. I'd go a quick hitch instead. The HF QH is about the cheapest, but you'll have to replace the top fork with one online if you get a bush hog. The replacement kicks the fork out about another 1/2 inch to clear some bush hog stuff. A hydraulic top link would help in kicking the fork out quickly to hook onto implements but hardly worth it unless you're swapping implements a lot during the day.

A carryall would be far more useful than a ballast box. Just get/find a pallet and attach it to the bottom and put some sides on it to make it capable of carrying lots of stuff to weight it down to use as ballast.
 

PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
2,048
1,074
113
NZ
On quick hitches - I think they're useful if your implements are heavy enough you can't horse them around. Personally I put all my implements on small dollys (made from plywood and cheap casters from online). My shed isn't large, and I have to move them around to fit them all in / to get things in and out. If your implements are on wheels you have no need for a quick hitch, in my opinion. However, if your storage area doesn't have a concrete floor then you'd need a different solution and a quick hitch may make sense.
 

rc51stierhoff

Well-known member

Equipment
B2650, MX6000, (BX sold)
Sep 13, 2021
1,795
1,902
113
Ohio
Good day. It sounds like a nice hobby farm close to a steady supply of good wine…awesome. I see you mention a cub cadet lawn mower…does that mean you don’t plan to mow with it? Do you need the mid PTO for anything? I also understood majority of your property is fenced, correct? I guess I wonder do you need access to the fenced area? Will all you tractor choices fit? Do you have any plans to own more property in foreseeable future? Any reason not to consider a small L (IMO the small L might be more machine for $$). If maneuverability is a premium maybe L doesnt make so much sense inside a fenced area with structures…but the L maybe let you lift a little more…when you get to your patio you’ll find out what you can put in a pallet and how important proper ballast is)…depending on how you plan to do chores with tractor and or loader or with wagon or cart…I guess I would be wondering about space constraints not really understanding your layout/property). Then between all the models you are considering check the height between any overhangs or garage doors…not necessarily a deal breaker but it is nice being able to leave the rops up and not worry about hitting something. Good luck.
 

jimh406

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
Kubota L2501 with R4 tires
Jan 29, 2021
2,127
1,535
113
Western MT
The only brands I seriously looked at were Kubota and JD. The resale of the others is bad in comparison.

That being said, I think the B2601 is too small do do very much wood work. The JD1025R is even smaller. Besides the lift capacity, the loaders aren't as strong. My Cluttered Garage on YouTube was able to bend the loader on his B2601, for instance. Even a light grapple is pretty heavy, and that's comes off of the lift capacity. I think you should consider the LX2610. It can lift quite a bit more, but it isn't hugely larger.
 

soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
I have a B2601. Try out the pedal well, they have a stiff spring that gives me a sore knee after a while. Not a deal breaker, adjusting the seat changes the angle a bit. But worth checking you're OK with it.

I personally wouldn't fill the tires. I'd start with a ballast box or a heavy rear implement and see if that's enough, and only ballast the tires if strictly necessary. Reasons for that are:
  • Ballasted tires don't relieve load on the front axle - weight behind the rear axle acts as a lever or counter balance, transferring weight from the front to the rear. Weight in the tires stops the wheels lifting, but doesn't relieve any load on the front wheels
  • Ballast boxes/implements can be removed when you don't want the weight - on the lawn, or for trailering and such. Weight in the tires is pretty much permanent
  • Ballasted tires are harder to work with for punctures etc
My B2601 has plenty of stability side to side on hills, and with a ballast box plenty of counter weight for the loader. But when I strip it down for mowing it's relatively light and nimble. If you try it out and it's not stable enough for you, you can easily add ballast to the tires later. If you get it it's hard to know if you could live without, and removing it is a pain.

What would you do with branches/tree trimmings? Chip or burn? My chipper is one of my more used implements - a cheap knockoff out of China, but it runs fine. It's a Wallenstein ripoff.

Would a stump grinder be PTO driven or hydraulic? I've never missed rear remotes on my B2601, the one use I would maybe have is for a hydraulic log splitter. Many people have top and tilt, but I don't often do ground engaging tasks that would need those. When I do I typically set the tilt once, and the B is small enough I can reach back over the seat for the tilt if I have to.

You can get two different buckets for the B2601, if you're doing snow work you might want the larger bucket. In theory it's too big for heavy materials like stone, but in reality I think you just fill the bucket 3/4 full (i.e. same size load as in the smaller bucket). It's also easier to fill a large bucket 3/4 full than to fill a small bucket 100% full if you're not super proficient with the loader.

You didn't mention which tires. Turfs might be suitable for what you describe, or R4, or the new R14? Make sure you check price with the tires you want - often they're priced with R1 as they're the cheapest tires, optioning a different tire can change the price.

The Kubota has split brakes, which does help with turn radius if you need it. Not sure on the Yanmar.

The Kubota will likely have much better resale than the Yanmar. I tend to look at my tractor as a loan - I bought it for $33K NZ, it'll sell for $33K when I'm done with it (inflation means a new one might be worth $40K by then, but either way I get my money back). So really you're only out of pocket the opportunity cost on the money. With a Yanmar the resale might mean that isn't true.

Is the real life lift capacity of the Yanmar really greater? Is the bucket bigger (so will it actually lift more), is it measured at the same point to the same height, does the front axle have enough strength to actually take that load? Kubota's tend to be rated reasonably conservatively, and ultimately the B2601 will lift a bucket load of anything I might put in the bucket. More capacity in theory is good, but if you can't fill the bucket any more.....does it matter?
Pedal well? I'm not quite positive what you mean. I did notice comfort changed depending on seat location as well as steering tilt. Before buying,I plan to test again with my SO so she can test too.

Thanks for the insight on ballast. I was leaning towards a ballast box that would also allow for some tool storage. I think I'll start with that first.

For now,I have been burning small branches. I also drag to the curb for pickup. I'm lucky enough to live just within village limits so the village crew comes a few times a year for brush pickup and will chip and haul away as much as I drag to the road. Additionally,I can schedule a dropoff of a dump truck and they pick it up the following day. I tend to not do this as it's difficult to get all the limbs and brush over the side by hand.
I would love a PTO chipper, but will probably look for a used one and not buy new. I have an older gas powered one, but in practice it doesn't work for sticks and is used for garden waste to prep for composting.

Stump grinder would be PTO powered, or at least that's whatI was looking at. Prices have really gone up on these so I'll probably rent a commercial unit first to see how many I can do in a day.

I have been looking at pricing of used tractors and both JD and Kubota hold resale a bit better, but they also start higher so in reality I'm not sure it's more than maybe 10-15%. I have not calculated this, more what it feels like.

I do think the Yanmar lifts more in real life, but maybe not as much as the specs would indicate. Tractor Bob on YouTube has a 3 part comparison between the B2601. SA324, and 2025R. Both Yanmar and Kubota out lift the JD by a wide margin. Tractor Bob sells Yanmar so they are a bit biased, but you get a decent idea.

Regarding bucket size..I'm not sure if I want 55" or 60".
 

soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
Good day. It sounds like a nice hobby farm close to a steady supply of good wine…awesome. I see you mention a cub cadet lawn mower…does that mean you don’t plan to mow with it? Do you need the mid PTO for anything? I also understood majority of your property is fenced, correct? I guess I wonder do you need access to the fenced area? Will all you tractor choices fit? Do you have any plans to own more property in foreseeable future? Any reason not to consider a small L (IMO the small L might be more machine for $$). If maneuverability is a premium maybe L doesnt make so much sense inside a fenced area with structures…but the L maybe let you lift a little more…when you get to your patio you’ll find out what you can put in a pallet and how important proper ballast is)…depending on how you plan to do chores with tractor and or loader or with wagon or cart…I guess I would be wondering about space constraints not really understanding your layout/property). Then between all the models you are considering check the height between any overhangs or garage doors…not necessarily a deal breaker but it is nice being able to leave the rops up and not worry about hitting something. Good luck.
Yes, I own a Cub Cadet XT2 lawn tractor with fabricated deck and EFI engine. I also have an older Wheel Horse 312-8 garden tractor. It's a work horse around my property. I have a receiver hitch on it and will pull my 4x6' utility trailer loaded with firewood and my splitter around my property. I do have a deck that fits the wheel horse, but it needs some TLC even though it does work. I am unlikely to get a mid mount mower for this tractor as the $2-3k for a mmm would go a long way towards a zero turn, but plans could change so I don't want to rule it out. I'd also like to be able to have the option of a snow blower in the future. Where I'm at right now tends to not get a lot of snow, but we do get quite a bit of snow in WNY and we plan to purchase more land in the future... but this is probably 10-20 years in the future. I want to have 20+ acres with a good amount wooded.

I am good with getting any of the looked at tractors into my fenced in yard. The main walking gate is only 4', but I added an 8' gate last year, and if needed, I can drive through my garage. I'm only limited by the 6.5' tall doors, and 7' ceiling in my garage.
 

soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
The only brands I seriously looked at were Kubota and JD. The resale of the others is bad in comparison.

That being said, I think the B2601 is too small do do very much wood work. The JD1025R is even smaller. Besides the lift capacity, the loaders aren't as strong. My Cluttered Garage on YouTube was able to bend the loader on his B2601, for instance. Even a light grapple is pretty heavy, and that's comes off of the lift capacity. I think you should consider the LX2610. It can lift quite a bit more, but it isn't hugely larger.
I am open to looking at the LX2610. The dealer initially said B or L series, but when comparing a B2601 next to I think a L3301 there was a pretty big size difference and I kinda ruled it out. I now realize the LX2610 is not much larger than the B01 and sits between those two. It looks to have a couple hundred lbs more lift capacity, more weight, and a larger engine despite the same HP rating. I am hesitant to go too big due to many obstacles and smaller property I currently own.
 

PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
2,048
1,074
113
NZ
The B2601 is a good size for 1 acre. If you don't really need a mid-PTO the L2501 (now L2502 I think) is excellent buying and noticeably stronger. My view is that a small tractor and a large tractor aren't as different in price as you'd think. A small tractor has all the same parts, they're just smaller. Small parts aren't a lot cheaper than big parts, and they cost the same to assemble in terms of labour.

Tractors do shrink when you get them home, and I don't really think an L is all that much bigger than a B01. My gut says it's too big for 1 acre though - just feels like overkill. That doesn't really hurt anything, but your neighbours may point and snigger at you.

Having said that, I personally am not a fan of buying for things you might do in the future, particularly 10+ years in the future. Tractors don't really lose value. If you buy what you need now and your needs change, you can sell and rebuy with very little penalty (if you're selling and buying the same age machines). Or you might choose to upgrade to new again if you are a bit wealthier in 10 years. It means you have the machine you need now without worrying. And if the land you buy in 10+ years time is not what you imagined today, maybe it's a totally different machine you need - a skid steer, or an excavator, or a large hay tractor.

Pedal well? I'm not quite positive what you mean. I did notice comfort changed depending on seat location as well as steering tilt. Before buying,I plan to test again with my SO so she can test too.
I meant to test it well. Spend enough time pushing the pedal and driving it to see if it's loading your knee. I don't really notice until I'm a couple hours in, but you should be able to tell if it's a bit more load than you expected even in 5 minutes of driving.

Thanks for the insight on ballast. I was leaning towards a ballast box that would also allow for some tool storage. I think I'll start with that first.
A ballast box isn't expensive. I loaded mine with old paving stones I had, so I can take them out again if I wish. It has enough space for the chainsaw and some tools as well on top of the pavers. When I'm using the loader I'm sometimes a bit space constrained, a big implement on the rear would probably hit into things, it's nicer using the ballast box. You may find the same with lots of trees and using a grapple - weaving between trees with a big implement isn't ideal.

For now,I have been burning small branches. I also drag to the curb for pickup. I'm lucky enough to live just within village limits so the village crew comes a few times a year for brush pickup and will chip and haul away as much as I drag to the road. Additionally,I can schedule a dropoff of a dump truck and they pick it up the following day. I tend to not do this as it's difficult to get all the limbs and brush over the side by hand.
The grapple could help with tipping into the dump truck. I sometimes have to build a ramp to get over the side of a large bin, the B isn't sometimes tall enough to tip over the side. A bit of dirt dumped in the right spot lifts the front wheels enough to give me an extra foot or so of height.

I would love a PTO chipper, but will probably look for a used one and not buy new. I have an older gas powered one, but in practice it doesn't work for sticks and is used for garden waste to prep for composting.
They do a lot more work than a gas powered one. Mine's essentially one of these: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004872445043.html . They shipped to my door from China for quite a bit less than I could buy locally. It's mostly steel plus a couple of bearings, not too much can go wrong. In the US you have more options, you can probably get a good second hand one - there's not much on offer in NZ.

Stump grinder would be PTO powered, or at least that's whatI was looking at. Prices have really gone up on these so I'll probably rent a commercial unit first to see how many I can do in a day.
You may be better to rent a mini-excavator or skid steer with grinder unit - a larger machine will stump grind very quickly compared to a small one. Once you're renting, may as well get the right tool. A stump grinder will probably rattle and bang on your new tractor quite a bit, better to work someone else's machine that hard.

I have been looking at pricing of used tractors and both JD and Kubota hold resale a bit better, but they also start higher so in reality I'm not sure it's more than maybe 10-15%. I have not calculated this, more what it feels like.
It's all relative - and even if you get it back on resale it's usually not all of it. What I mean is that if you buy a $25K tractor instead of a $20K tractor, and they both lose 50% of their value, then at resale the difference is $12,500 vs $10,000. Of course, my theory is that tractors don't actually devalue, the new ones just go up in price with inflation. Who knows if I'm right, I don't buy and sell that often.

Regarding bucket size..I'm not sure if I want 55" or 60".
In NZ I didn't get the option, only 55" was available. In the US quite a few people get the 60". Again, in real life you'll probably never notice the difference. It lifts a bucket load of stuff, you don't really notice how large the bucket is.
 

mikester

Well-known member

Equipment
M59 TLB
Oct 21, 2017
3,047
1,570
113
Canada
www.divergentstuff.ca
I usually start by operating each and every machine I'm considering to buy. A paper spec is only as good as the paper its printed on.

A loader is important to me. If a machine can't do two functions at the same time it's worthless to me. How fast to lift and curl to full height? Bucket dump speed?

You need to know what's important to you otherwise you are just asking people to tell you what your favourite color is.
 

soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
I usually start by operating each and every machine I'm considering to buy. A paper spec is only as good as the paper its printed on.

A loader is important to me. If a machine can't do two functions at the same time it's worthless to me. How fast to lift and curl to full height? Bucket dump speed?

You need to know what's important to you otherwise you are just asking people to tell you what your favourite color is.
I've tested the machines. Both are similar, the B is slightly smaller than the SA325, and likely either will meet my needs. I may test the LX and price one up before making my final decision as it looks like that might be a closer comparison to the SA325 size wise.

Side by side pedals seemed more comfortable, treadle more intuitive, but I felt I had to push down with my heel to reverse so I'd need more time, but I'm also assuming this gets better with time?

Really it comes down to dealer and pricing. I'm asking questions as I've never bought a tractor before and do not know specifically what to look for or how to exactly translate driving around the dealer lot, maybe picking up snow or gravel they have piled and moving it to actual work. Most dealers don't want you actually demoing. JD was the only one that said, there's a gravel pile out back, go play.
 

Rdrcr

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
L2501 w/ S2T Turbo Kit = 35 PTO HP (Current), B2601 (Sold)
May 7, 2021
621
641
93
WA
^^^^
Reversing with the treadle pedal is easier when I hook my foot underneath the front of the pedal and pull up. It’s a bit unnatural and uncomfortable to push with my heal.

Mike
 
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soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
^^^^
Reversing with the treadle pedal is easier when I hook my foot underneath the front of the pedal and pull up. It’s a bit unnatural and uncomfortable to push with my heal.

Mike
Mike, thanks. I watched a couple YouTube videos and need to go back and try some of the other methods of using the treadle pedal.
 
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PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
2,048
1,074
113
NZ
Mike, thanks. I watched a couple YouTube videos and need to go back and try some of the other methods of using the treadle pedal.
I think you get used to it pretty quickly. When I drive Mum's ride on mower with two pedals I'm constantly pushing the missing other end of the treadle to go backwards. Similarly you soon get used to driving a mini-ex with two levers whilst looking over your shoulder going backwards. It's all just muscle memory. 5 hours in you'll be wondering why you had any concerns at all.
 

jimh406

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
Kubota L2501 with R4 tires
Jan 29, 2021
2,127
1,535
113
Western MT
I think you get used to it pretty quickly.
I agree. It's not like the separate pedals are usually setup like an automobile. You are going to have to learn either way.

Fwiw, I prefer using my heel to go backwards, but I have an L2501. It seems there is a bit of difference in treadle pedal depending on models.
 

JimmyJazz

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Aug 8, 2020
1,084
631
113
Pittsburgh, Pa
I think there is a much better resale market for the Kubota thus it may hold its value better. Breadth and depth of market are important also when it comes to parts availability. Good luck.
 

soloz2

Member

Equipment
B2601
Feb 10, 2023
71
73
18
WNY
Yeah, I think the pedals on most are opposite what one might expect after driving a vehicle. I know I've driven a few different tractors with side by side and I think on most of them I've confused the pedals once or twice. I know I did the first time I drove one, a 1025R and I was able to move some gravel with it, but definitely had to fiddle with pedals and was in the high when I should have been low and then found low too low. LOL. I did the same last week when I test drove the Kioti.

Either way it'll take some getting used too. This was where I was feeling the Kubota setup was more intuitive, even if it felt a bit less comfortable initially. I did do some searching and it seems many people complain about the reverse being stiff on the B2601. I did not try any other Kubotas so I think I'll test drive the LX2610 before making any final decisions.
 

dirtydeed

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650 BH77, U27-4R2, BX23TLBM, box blade, rear blade, flail mower, Stump Grinder
Dec 8, 2017
2,831
3,070
113
Wind Gap, PA
I'm thinking you'll like the LX. Very comfy machine that makes for an excellent landscape tractor. Be sure to get the SSQA (maybe they all come with it standard now). Got some stumps? No problem. I've done about 200 of them with the Woodland Mills stump grinder behind the B2650 (same as the newer LX2610). Ash are pretty tough, just take your time and let the grinder eat. The stumps below were sizeable Oaks.

Best of luck to you in your decision.

Stump 2_1.JPG


Stump 2_3.JPG


IMG_1941.JPG
 

PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
2,048
1,074
113
NZ
was in the high when I should have been low and then found low too low. LOL.
The three range gearbox on the Kubota models would help a lot with this - there's a Medium, which predictably is just right for many things.