Can't remove flat tire on my BX23S

fried1765

Well-known member

Equipment
Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, Ford 8N, SCAG Liberty Z, Gravely Pro.
Nov 14, 2019
1,159
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113
Eastham, Ma
Been using that bar for more than 10 years with no problems. Never needed a cheater pipe.
As with all aspects of life, (un) common sense must be utilized.
I have both electric & air impacts, but the bar is my go to tool. Quick, easy, and no cord or hose to drag out.
On the rare occasion where the bar fails, the impacts come out.
All true!
But.........Because you never needed a cheater pipe, there has never been a real danger of snapping a bolt or stud off.
It is when raw brute force is applied that things go South!
 

cthomas

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
LX2610 HSDC
Jan 1, 2017
135
47
28
La Farge Wi
As for cheater pipes are never needed, then you have never done brakes on an early VW's axle nut torque was 348 foot pounds if I remember correctly. And back in the early nineties impacts sucked. Ended up buying a torque multiplier.
 
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Dave Ogren

New member

Equipment
BX23S
Feb 16, 2022
13
5
3
Asheville, N. C.
I have a BX23s with 35 hours on it that has a flat tire in the front. I've tried with all my might to loosen the lug nuts with a socket wrench and none of them will budge. I've seen some Youtube vids that say you don't need an impact wrench, but I just can't do anything with hand tools. Am I just a wimp or could there be something wrong that I don't understand? I stomped on the handle with all my might and literally nothing happened except my foot hurting.
I'm very inexperienced with tractors and tools, so apologies for stupid things I say or do.
Kubota apparently assembles their tractors without using any lubricant. The lug bolts on my BX23S were hard to remove. After I lubed the accelerator lever it works much better. Greasing all of the seat slides etc the seat swivels like it should. Good luck.
 

fried1765

Well-known member

Equipment
Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, Ford 8N, SCAG Liberty Z, Gravely Pro.
Nov 14, 2019
1,159
809
113
Eastham, Ma
Kubota apparently assembles their tractors without using any lubricant. The lug bolts on my BX23S were hard to remove. After I lubed the accelerator lever it works much better. Greasing all of the seat slides etc the seat swivels like it should. Good luck.
It is often advised by manufacturers to not use any lube on "lug bolts".
Dry.....and with a torque wrench!
 
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Henro

Well-known member

Equipment
B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
3,425
1,227
113
North of Pittsburgh PA
It is often advised by manufacturers to not use any lube on "lug bolts".
Dry.....and with a torque wrench!
I wonder if there is any issue with lubing the nuts/studs/bolts after properly torquing them? To prevent rust to some degree...

Myself, I tend to use lubricant on the studs for rust prevention purposes. I understand this is not recommended. I also know when I get new tires on my road vehicles, the tire places just use a impact driver to install the lug nuts...never saw a torque wrench being used by these "professionals" over the last 50 years or so.

Reality VS Practicality I suppose. BUT we never seem to hear of accidents being caused by a wheel falling off due to failed studs...more likely due to loose lug nuts...but even then really rare it seems.

Edit: I just realized what a bad boy I might be. I used blue locktite on the studs of my BX2200 when I installed rear wheel spacers, since those nuts would be behind the wheel, and not accessible to check for tightness, without removing the rear wheel. Did use a torque wrench but I suppose I broke the rules using the locktite...
 

fried1765

Well-known member

Equipment
Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, Ford 8N, SCAG Liberty Z, Gravely Pro.
Nov 14, 2019
1,159
809
113
Eastham, Ma
I wonder if there is any issue with lubing the nuts/studs/bolts after properly torquing them? To prevent rust to some degree...

Myself, I tend to use lubricant on the studs for rust prevention purposes. I understand this is not recommended. I also know when I get new tires on my road vehicles, the tire places just use a impact driver to install the lug nuts...never saw a torque wrench being used by these "professionals" over the last 50 years or so.

Reality VS Practicality I suppose. BUT we never seem to hear of accidents being caused by a wheel falling off due to failed studs...more likely due to loose lug nuts...but even then really rare it seems.

Edit: I just realized what a bad boy I might be. I used blue locktite on the studs of my BX2200 when I installed rear wheel spacers, since those nuts would be behind the wheel, and not accessible to check for tightness, without removing the rear wheel. Did use a torque wrench but I suppose I broke the rules using the locktite...
Twice recently, I have had tires/wheels mounted at Pep Boys.......BOTH times they used a torque wrench!
 

OrangeKrush

Well-known member

Equipment
BX2680, LA344 with Piranha tooth bar, LP PF 1242, LP Rear Blade, KK 60" BB
Nov 15, 2020
810
342
63
Indy
Twice recently, I have had tires/wheels mounted at Pep Boys.......BOTH times they used a torque wrench!
Discount tire has always torqued mine, I don't use a torque wrench just my years of experience. Now I have had problems with other shops and lugs not properly tightened.. at all!😳
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,797
1,005
113
North East
Alloy wheels need to be properly torqued, or you will damage them. Torquing by "feel" is about the same as the cop "estimating your speed" by eye. Neither are very accurate, and both will lose in a court of law.
 

OrangeKrush

Well-known member

Equipment
BX2680, LA344 with Piranha tooth bar, LP PF 1242, LP Rear Blade, KK 60" BB
Nov 15, 2020
810
342
63
Indy
Alloy wheels need to be properly torqued, or you will damage them. Torquing by "feel" is about the same as the cop "estimating your speed" by eye. Neither are very accurate, and both will lose in a court of law.
"Alloy wheels need to be properly torqued!"

This is correct.. with or without a torque wrench! Don't overly tighten, tighten evenly and in a star pattern! I'd be more worried about using an impact to seat them for damage.

Doing it since the 70s with alloy and any other type of metal wheels are made of. I've never touched a lugnut with a torque wrench. Common sense and experience play a big part here.. not saying there's anything wrong with using one, just not mandatory. Now if I decide to put my 2" spacers on my tractor.. I might use one for my peace of mind since I'm threading into aluminum.
 

58Ford

Member

Equipment
BX23s + LP cutter
Jan 1, 2022
91
57
18
SW Washington
The issue with using ANY mechanical device like an air ratchet (used in most wheel & tire shops) or an electric version is what do you do on the side of the road when you have neither options available. Your basic tire changing tools are unlikely to get a lug nut off that has been tightened with an air or electric wrench.

Not so bad for tractor use out in the field but if on the road and using a vehicles tools you would be in trouble. Be real careful with this on your daily driver though.
 

jyoutz

Well-known member

Equipment
MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
Jan 14, 2019
1,043
517
113
Edgewood, New Mexico
I have a BX23s with 35 hours on it that has a flat tire in the front. I've tried with all my might to loosen the lug nuts with a socket wrench and none of them will budge. I've seen some Youtube vids that say you don't need an impact wrench, but I just can't do anything with hand tools. Am I just a wimp or could there be something wrong that I don't understand? I stomped on the handle with all my might and literally nothing happened except my foot hurting.
I'm very inexperienced with tractors and tools, so apologies for stupid things I say or do.
You don’t need an impact wrench. Just use a breaker bar instead of a ratchet for your socket. Then slip a 2’ pipe over the breaker bar handle to apply leverage.
 

jyoutz

Well-known member

Equipment
MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
Jan 14, 2019
1,043
517
113
Edgewood, New Mexico
Impact wrench, highly effective, highly expensive.
Cheap alternative:
Absolutely. And even better it you add a long pipe to the handle for even more leverage.
 

fried1765

Well-known member

Equipment
Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, Ford 8N, SCAG Liberty Z, Gravely Pro.
Nov 14, 2019
1,159
809
113
Eastham, Ma
Absolutely. And even better it you add a long pipe to the handle for even more leverage.
Then,....... put your full body weight on that "long pipe" extension,.... "for even more leverage", and jump up and down on it as well......and repeat.... so that you can then snap one or more of the studs/bolts off.
It is obviously a much more convenient method:cry: than using (the proper tool) an impact wrench!
 
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58Ford

Member

Equipment
BX23s + LP cutter
Jan 1, 2022
91
57
18
SW Washington
Actually, if you google the question the consensus is pretty unanimous - not recommended. Seriously! do it - the first response tells you why - over torquing. Weirdly, popular mechanics does not agree.

You are not supposed to tighten lug nuts with an impact wrench. If you ignore that at least tighten all lug nuts by hand first then use. And like I said earlier good luck getting them off without an impact wrench.
 

GreensvilleJay

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
4,369
1,312
113
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
re: You are not supposed to tighten lug nuts with an impact wrench.
I dare ya to tell NASCAR that !;)
A PROPERLY adjusted impact is 100% fine for putting nuts on.

I bet most( all ?) that say don't do it, have never serviced their impact gun, added inline oiler(with proper oil), set air pressure AT THE GUN. The 'grab the gun, 155#,goforit' is NOT the correct way.
I've only broken ONE bar in 5 decades, company that bought out the original mfr replaced it free of charge. I've never broken any studs off of the 1,000s over the decades.. I use one,quick,short pull after setting it up not really different than a quick burp. Now if youadd a long cheater and CONTINUOUSLY pull, that's a different !
 

fried1765

Well-known member

Equipment
Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, Ford 8N, SCAG Liberty Z, Gravely Pro.
Nov 14, 2019
1,159
809
113
Eastham, Ma
Actually, if you google the question the consensus is pretty unanimous - not recommended. Seriously! do it - the first response tells you why - over torquing. Weirdly, popular mechanics does not agree.

You are not supposed to tighten lug nuts with an impact wrench. If you ignore that at least tighten all lug nuts by hand first then use. And like I said earlier good luck getting them off without an impact wrench.
I believe that impact wrenches are used to tighten lug nuts at all automotive assembly plants.
 

lynnmor

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601-1
May 3, 2021
557
371
63
Red Lion
The real problem is that the dealer over-tightened the lugs, he should be asked to come out and do it right with a torque wrench. I believe that all of the small tractors are shipped with the wheels in a separate package.

All of my lugnuts, sub-frame and other dealer installed bolts were loose or very loose, these things are usually assembled by the lowest paid and unqualified employees.

Tire shops that use an air powered impact wrench probably use torque sticks to achieve the proper torque. Note that these things may not work well with battery powered tools.

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GreensvilleJay

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
4,369
1,312
113
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
re: I believe that impact wrenches are used to tighten lug nuts at all automotive assembly plants.
assy line impacts are 5/8" ..NOT 1/2" or 3/4" drives... cuts down on thefts, at least at Ford in Oakville...years ago.