Buying a LX2610cab this week and any buying advice appreciated. Thanks

Goz63

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Equipment
Kubota L2501, LA525 loader, QH15,Land Pride RCR1860, BB2560, SGC0660, forks
Jun 19, 2021
230
249
43
Mississippi
Your backhoe weighs 2k? All the ones I have seen for the L series are about 900-1000. Must be a “B” thing.
 

Njtool

Active member

Equipment
Lx2610 HSDC. BH77 backhoe
Jan 1, 2021
157
188
43
New jersey
You’re right. I didn’t check the weight. It it is a lot of steel. 850# plus the extension for the seat. According to the web.

I guess in comparison, a brush hog has lots more steel on it than a backhoe with hydraulics etc.... oh wait, the backhoe weights so much more than an RCR1260 which weighs 496#

still, the idea of the front wheels coming off the ground is....

and to my point. If someone asks a direct question, why do people feel the need to respond who don’t own or have not run the equipment that’s being talked about?
 
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TomRC

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Jun 16, 2020
139
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KY
Bingo is right Njtool. Sounds like you don't mind going slow when you mow and only have to mow occasionally. Maybe the OP will only be cutting a few times a year and maybe his property is very flat. If so a 5' mower and a LX2610 would be fine.

Some of us actually cut 5 acres on a regular basis with 25hp tractors that are very similar to the LX2610 and deal with frustrations related to lack of power to pull on slopes, or simply the time to cut that amount with a 5' mower, and stability issues when we take the loader off to mow which many of us do to get that little bit of extra power so we don't have to spend the day in low gear if we keep the loader on the tractor. 25hp tractors and mowing 5 acres is not an efficient setup for several reasons.

And to mention a 6' mower for a LX2610.....not prudent. Sure it could turn it but take the loader off an LX2610 and lift a 6' mower which you tend to have to do when cutting around ditches and edges of ponds and in tight spaces and see what happens to the front wheels on a LX2610 on anything other that level ground when you lift it. A 6' mower would be a much better choice but the LX2610 is not up to that task from a safety standpoint.

And I do think the OP should consider a land plane for his driveway in addition to or as a replacement to a box blade. I say this only because I wish I had a land plane instead of having to use my box blade to maintain my gravel driveway. Better tool for the job and have seen so first hand.

Just responding to 2 "DIRECT" points (mowing & driveway maintenance) the OP made in his first post that I think are very relevant since he mentioned mowing a substantial amount and maintaining a long gravel driveway.
 
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Fordtech86

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L3200
Aug 7, 2018
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Opinions can be a good thing….OP stated they are a tractor newbie but did have some specific questions. OP also didn’t give all the details needed.

How is this relative? Just my experience…I get calls all day long from service writers on how much labor it is to install xxx part for customer calling in that knows whats wrong with their vehicle. I used to question why they want to change xxx part, that I have never changed in my experience. Now I just tell them what the labor is to change the part. I benefit either way. I get to change their parts and maybe its fixed (not often), I get to do my job and properly advise them what they need, or I run them off and avoid the headache that they know more about what they are here asking me to do.
 

Newaterman

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Equipment
LX2610 HSDC, Z422-54KW
Feb 14, 2021
76
211
33
Vermont
Absolutely go with the R-14’s, after plenty of time running pay loaders and over equipment with R-4 type tires on slick surfaces in a believer in the 14’s now.

if you want to do tire chains you’ll need spacers, and honestly I wouldn’t want to run the machine with out then anyway.

absolutely get a third function valve even if you don’t intend to get a grapple right off the bat.

I’m not much help on the cutter as I do all of my mowing with a zero turn.

60” bucket for sure, get a tooth bar if needed.

enjoy it, they’re a great little machine. I’ve got a lot of average but lots of soft ground and tight spots. It hasn’t disappointed.

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RichardAaronlx2610

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Equipment
Lx2610 Cab, Fel, Backhoe, Grapple, Box Grader, Forks
Aug 3, 2021
193
218
43
New Jersey
No complaints with my Lx2610. Great little machine. The backhoe is no speed king, but it will get the job done. Slow and steady. The heat and air both work wonderful and the loader has plenty power. I like The old r4 tires personally. I ordered Wheel spacers but they still aren’t in.

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RichardAaronlx2610

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Lx2610 Cab, Fel, Backhoe, Grapple, Box Grader, Forks
Aug 3, 2021
193
218
43
New Jersey
I also Recommend the front and rear work lights. They work beautifully. Not sure if it comes with the fronts or if it was extra. But they work great!
 
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Old_Paint

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
LX2610HSDSU, LA535 FEL w/54" bucket, LandPride BB1248, Woodland Mills WC-68
Dec 5, 2020
875
591
93
AL
My take:

1.) Have the R14's, LOVE 'em. I got the bigguns on my SU model. Can't put the oversize tires on the CAB models with the mid-mount PTO.

2.)At that price, I have to ask if you wrote the check yet. The only thing I'd do differently is the RCR1260. That cutter might be a little big for the LX2610 with only 19 HP at the PTO.

3.) Unless you're going to be picking up a lot of loose material on a flat surface, the difference in a 60" and 54" bucket isn't going to make much difference, except more digging resistance on the wider bucket. The 54" bucket is the "Heavy Duty" bucket. It will stop the tractor VERY quickly. We're talking teeth embedded in the steering wheel quick. Remember, you're on a compact tractor, and if you try to push a wide blade through hard dirt or roots, you're gonna run out of horsepower and traction real quick. The first accessory I'd add to that bucket is a tooth bar if you plan on digging anything significant with it. If you're scooping up barn waste or moving loose soil around, you'll be OK. But don't even think about pushing that bucket anywhere trees have ever been without a tooth bar. You'll be sorely disappointed, especially with a 6" wider bucket. The next issue is that with a 54" bucket, I often run out of lift capacity with clay soil. That much dirt is HEAVY, especially when it's wet. The extra 6" will add a couple cubic feet to the bucket capacity. If I couldn't pick up less, I'm certainly not going to pick up more. Pick your bucket based on what you're going to use it for.

4. The best advice I can give is to stay away from ponds with rear mounted cutters. But, read my tag line. Advice is free, and worth every penny you pay for it. That's a sure way to try to teach your tractor how to swim. It WILL happen, one day. Every time you get near the edge of a pond with either end of the tractor pointed at the pond, you're tempting fate. They're not good at swimming. It only takes a small error or one spot that's a little softer than you thought it was, and you have a cutter dragging you into the pond. Being in a cab, it ain't like you're just gonna jump off to escape, either. Rule of thumb, if you have roll-over protection (CAB models have it built in) you wear the seat belt to avoid being crushed. The scene at the Porsche dealer in the movie "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" comes to mind. "Who's the U-Boat Commander?" If you want to use the tractor to maintain pond perimeters, then I'd recommend side mounted mowing equipment designed for being able to angle the cutting head (so that the tractor is NEVER pointed at the water) with counterweights on the opposite side. I don't think I've ever seen a pond that didn't have a significant slope around water edge. That's begging for rollover unless you can keep the tractor up on "level" ground and tilt the mowing machine. What comes to mind is flail mowers similar to what road crews use on narrow right of ways with high shoulders. Having put a bush-hog and tractor in the creek a few times (then having to explain why I needed help getting it out to my step-dad) I can say this is NOT an enjoyable learning experience. The next part of the equation is that with PTO driven equipment that has a direct drive shaft connection, you want the angles of the two u-joints equal and complimentary, meaning the angles add up to zero with the PTO shaft and load shaft as parallel as possible. Driveshafts will come apart with much noise and destruction if you run them "around corners". Spicer has some good info on driveshafts. Won't hurt to read up on them. If you've ever seen or installed a drive-shaft for a 400HP electric motor rated for 3600 RPM, you'd understand. The faster it turns and the higher the torque rating, the more critical the alignment and the bigger the u-joints are gonna be.

You'll enjoy the tractor if you learn safe habits first and maintain them. It will kill you if you don't. Tractors are DANGEROUS. That's what makes them useful. By your own admission, you're about to be a first time owner. If you have prior experience with tractors, then I'm preaching to the choir. But a first time owner quickly becomes an obituary in the newspaper with even a modicum of overconfidence. First rule of thumb: If it makes you a little bit nervous, you probably shouldn't be doing it. Second rule. If you've never done it before, you SHOULD be VERY NERVOUS. Otherwise, welcome to a fun world full of experts. I use that term loosely. Go buy that tractor. You've picked a good bunch to learn from. They usually treat noobs purty good.
 
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RegionRat

New member

Equipment
LX3310
Sep 20, 2021
27
5
3
Northwest Indiana
My take:

1.) Have the R14's, LOVE 'em. I got the bigguns on my SU model. Can't put the oversize tires on the CAB models with the mid-mount PTO.

2.)At that price, I have to ask if you wrote the check yet. The only thing I'd do differently is the RCR1260. That cutter might be a little big for the LX2610 with only 19 HP at the PTO.

3.) Unless you're going to be picking up a lot of loose material on a flat surface, the difference in a 60" and 54" bucket isn't going to make much difference, except more digging resistance on the wider bucket. The 54" bucket is the "Heavy Duty" bucket. It will stop the tractor VERY quickly. We're talking teeth embedded in the steering wheel quick. Remember, you're on a compact tractor, and if you try to push a wide blade through hard dirt or roots, you're gonna run out of horsepower and traction real quick. The first accessory I'd add to that bucket is a tooth bar if you plan on digging anything significant with it. If you're scooping up barn waste or moving loose soil around, you'll be OK. But don't even think about pushing that bucket anywhere trees have ever been without a tooth bar. You'll be sorely disappointed, especially with a 6" wider bucket. The next issue is that with a 54" bucket, I often run out of lift capacity with clay soil. That much dirt is HEAVY, especially when it's wet. The extra 6" will add a couple cubic feet to the bucket capacity. If I couldn't pick up less, I'm certainly not going to pick up more. Pick your bucket based on what you're going to use it for.

4. The best advice I can give is to stay away from ponds with rear mounted cutters. But, read my tag line. Advice is free, and worth every penny you pay for it. That's a sure way to try to teach your tractor how to swim. It WILL happen, one day. Every time you get near the edge of a pond with either end of the tractor pointed at the pond, you're tempting fate. They're not good at swimming. It only takes a small error or one spot that's a little softer than you thought it was, and you have a cutter dragging you into the pond. Being in a cab, it ain't like you're just gonna jump off to escape, either. Rule of thumb, if you have roll-over protection (CAB models have it built in) you wear the seat belt to avoid being crushed. The scene at the Porsche dealer in the movie "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" comes to mind. "Who's the U-Boat Commander?" If you want to use the tractor to maintain pond perimeters, then I'd recommend side mounted mowing equipment designed for being able to angle the cutting head (so that the tractor is NEVER pointed at the water) with counterweights on the opposite side. I don't think I've ever seen a pond that didn't have a significant slope around water edge. That's begging for rollover unless you can keep the tractor up on "level" ground and tilt the mowing machine. What comes to mind is flail mowers similar to what road crews use on narrow right of ways with high shoulders. Having put a bush-hog and tractor in the creek a few times (then having to explain why I needed help getting it out to my step-dad) I can say this is NOT an enjoyable learning experience. The next part of the equation is that with PTO driven equipment that has a direct drive shaft connection, you want the angles of the two u-joints equal and complimentary, meaning the angles add up to zero with the PTO shaft and load shaft as parallel as possible. Driveshafts will come apart with much noise and destruction if you run them "around corners". Spicer has some good info on driveshafts. Won't hurt to read up on them. If you've ever seen or installed a drive-shaft for a 400HP electric motor rated for 3600 RPM, you'd understand. The faster it turns and the higher the torque rating, the more critical the alignment and the bigger the u-joints are gonna be.

You'll enjoy the tractor if you learn safe habits first and maintain them. It will kill you if you don't. Tractors are DANGEROUS. That's what makes them useful. By your own admission, you're about to be a first time owner. If you have prior experience with tractors, then I'm preaching to the choir. But a first time owner quickly becomes an obituary in the newspaper with even a modicum of overconfidence. First rule of thumb: If it makes you a little bit nervous, you probably shouldn't be doing it. Second rule. If you've never done it before, you SHOULD be VERY NERVOUS. Otherwise, welcome to a fun world full of experts. I use that term loosely. Go buy that tractor. You've picked a good bunch to learn from. They usually treat noobs purty good.
Great post! A guy I know (first time tractor owner) recently crushed himself under the rear tire of JD 4 series. By the grace of God he survived, but not with life altering injuries. Read the owners manual, focus on what your doing, and never alter safety features.
 
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RegionRat

New member

Equipment
LX3310
Sep 20, 2021
27
5
3
Northwest Indiana
that is nonsense. Local dealer told me 9 months for LX3310, and I found one an hour and a half away it was ready in a week and a half. They had a bunch of them, as did several other locations. Just keep calling more dealers.

Man I wish that were still the case. I called probably 25 dealers all over....indiana, wisconsin, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Michigan..... no dice. Found a few LX2610s but no 3310s.
 

RichardAaronlx2610

Active member

Equipment
Lx2610 Cab, Fel, Backhoe, Grapple, Box Grader, Forks
Aug 3, 2021
193
218
43
New Jersey
Great post! A guy I know (first time tractor owner) recently crushed himself under the rear tire of JD 4 series. By the grace of God he survived, but not with life altering injuries. Read the owners manual, focus on what your doing, and never alter safety features.
How do you feel about removing warning labels? Lol
 

RichardAaronlx2610

Active member

Equipment
Lx2610 Cab, Fel, Backhoe, Grapple, Box Grader, Forks
Aug 3, 2021
193
218
43
New Jersey
Ha...I get it. The only thing I think about is selling the tractor to a newbie that might read it. After seeing first hand how terrible things can get when a machine gets a hold of person.....I'll just leave the labels on
Yeah i hear Ya, i dont Plan on ever selling mine. But i like the clean look lol
 

Old_Paint

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
LX2610HSDSU, LA535 FEL w/54" bucket, LandPride BB1248, Woodland Mills WC-68
Dec 5, 2020
875
591
93
AL
How do you feel about removing warning labels? Lol
If it's a label that makes sense, I prefer to leave it on. If it's a label that tells me that R14 oversize tires cause cancer in California, nah, that one can go. I ain't in California, so I'm in no danger from my oversized tires. The whole purpose of the labels is to protect the manufacturer, not the user. If they can prove they put the labels on or have a standard to do so, they're clear. Peel 'em off if ya want, but if the tractor does something different from what the label says through no fault of yours, you're probably on your own unless you have very deep pockets and can afford better lawyers than a manufacturer can. Remember Murphy's #1 rule. Don't mess with Mrs. Murphy.
 
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