Antifreeze

85Hokie

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90-'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
8,662
843
113
Bedford - VA
made for diesels..... I dont think you can go wrong using it.
 

kcs

Member

Equipment
Kubota B2650
Jan 9, 2021
62
8
8
Virginia
Ok thanks I use that in my diesel pickup and was just wondering if I needed to put OEM back in it
 

Roadworthy

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
L2501 HST
Aug 17, 2019
1,254
256
83
Benton City, WA
What does your owner's manual say to use? My 2019 L2501 calls for an ethylene glycol based antifreeze. That's plain old garden variety Prestone I've used for many years. Most brands have ethylene glycol products.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

kcs

Member

Equipment
Kubota B2650
Jan 9, 2021
62
8
8
Virginia
What does your owner's manual say to use? My 2019 L2501 calls for an ethylene glycol based antifreeze. That's plain old garden variety Prestone I've used for many years. Most brands have ethylene glycol products.
Ok thanks. I’ll check and see. I know I know the antifreeze that’s in it is green.
 

19thSF

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650, loader, MMM, heavy hitch, pallet forks, piranha tooth bar, rear blade
Mar 1, 2020
291
70
28
Glendale, Rhode Island
Just as an FYI. Kubota coolant/antifreeze is manufactured by CCI manufacturing in Lemont, IL. The Safety Data Sheet lists the components as follows:

Ethylene Glycol 85-94%
Diethylene Glycol Less than 5%
Hydrated inorganic acid, organic acid salts less than 7%
Water less than 5%

The appearance is listed as "Clear, slightly viscous, yellowish green dyed liquid

I don't think that you need to be concerned, about the make, in as much as Kubota doesn't make it (no surprise there) and it's clear until they dye it. Just pay attention to the components.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

swpflipper

Active member

Equipment
MX5400 HST, LA1065 FEL, HR2572 box blade - S30 flip Screen
Nov 3, 2020
100
50
28
Arizona
I recently did a lot of research on coolants. I did because of the mix of vehicles in my fleet and I wanted to get down to one coolant. Color is not how to pick.
There are four main types of coolant (your Zerex is #4):
  • Inorganic Acid Technology (IAT): The liquid that most people think of when it comes to coolant or antifreeze, IAT coolants are conventional low-silicate and typically used in cars and light-duty trucks. These are typically green or pink in color. For heavy duty engines, IATs are available pre-charged with supplemental coolant additives (SCAs) that protect the engine from pitting and corrosion. IAT coolants need more frequent service and supplemental additives to keep the coolant system working properly.
  1. Organic Acid Technology (OAT): Just as the name suggests, this type of coolant uses organic acids and has extended service life. These coolants last much longer than IAT varieties and are designed for use in all heavy and light-duty diesel engines, as well as natural gas and gasoline engines. If properly maintained, some OAT coolants can provide around 1,000,000 miles or 20,000 engine hours of service without the use of SCAs
  2. Nitrited Organic Acid Technology (NOAT): These are similar in service life and performance to OAT coolants, but employ nitrite and sometimes molybdate for engine liner pitting protection, which means that NOAT coolants may need to be serviced with an Extender during the life of the coolant. NOAT coolants also offer extended life and are designed for use in heavy duty ELC, NOAT and EC1 systems. (Check the manufacturer’s specifications to verify your coolant system type.)
  3. Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT): This is a combination of some of the inhibitors used in IAT and OAT coolants, usually a low-silicate, nitrite/molybdate-based technology. HOAT coolants may need to be serviced with SCAs at the service intervals (typically 150,000 miles or at the manufacturer’s recommended interval), but this occurs less frequently than with IAT coolants.


Different technologies DO NOT MIX

OAT and NOAT coolants do not require SCAs

These additives are known as corrosion inhibitors, with some of the more common ones being:

• Silicate/Silicone – provides protection for the aluminum components in a vehicle’s cooling system

• Triazoles/Thiazoles – protect copper and brass components

• Sodium Molybdate – protects ferrous metals, cast iron and steel from corrosion

• Nitrate – protects against pitting and crevice attack in aluminum components

• Nitrite – prevents cylinder-liner pitting in cast-iron components in heavy duty engines

• Organic acids – used as a replacement for other inhibitors, such as silicate/silicone, nitrites, nitrate, phosphates, amines and borates
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

19thSF

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650, loader, MMM, heavy hitch, pallet forks, piranha tooth bar, rear blade
Mar 1, 2020
291
70
28
Glendale, Rhode Island
I recently did a lot of research on coolants. I did because of the mix of vehicles in my fleet and I wanted to get down to one coolant. Color is not how to pick.
There are four main types of coolant (your Zerex is #4):
  • Inorganic Acid Technology (IAT): The liquid that most people think of when it comes to coolant or antifreeze, IAT coolants are conventional low-silicate and typically used in cars and light-duty trucks. These are typically green or pink in color. For heavy duty engines, IATs are available pre-charged with supplemental coolant additives (SCAs) that protect the engine from pitting and corrosion. IAT coolants need more frequent service and supplemental additives to keep the coolant system working properly.
  1. Organic Acid Technology (OAT): Just as the name suggests, this type of coolant uses organic acids and has extended service life. These coolants last much longer than IAT varieties and are designed for use in all heavy and light-duty diesel engines, as well as natural gas and gasoline engines. If properly maintained, some OAT coolants can provide around 1,000,000 miles or 20,000 engine hours of service without the use of SCAs
  2. Nitrited Organic Acid Technology (NOAT): These are similar in service life and performance to OAT coolants, but employ nitrite and sometimes molybdate for engine liner pitting protection, which means that NOAT coolants may need to be serviced with an Extender during the life of the coolant. NOAT coolants also offer extended life and are designed for use in heavy duty ELC, NOAT and EC1 systems. (Check the manufacturer’s specifications to verify your coolant system type.)
  3. Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT): This is a combination of some of the inhibitors used in IAT and OAT coolants, usually a low-silicate, nitrite/molybdate-based technology. HOAT coolants may need to be serviced with SCAs at the service intervals (typically 150,000 miles or at the manufacturer’s recommended interval), but this occurs less frequently than with IAT coolants.


Different technologies DO NOT MIX

OAT and NOAT coolants do not require SCAs

These additives are known as corrosion inhibitors, with some of the more common ones being:

• Silicate/Silicone – provides protection for the aluminum components in a vehicle’s cooling system

• Triazoles/Thiazoles – protect copper and brass components

• Sodium Molybdate – protects ferrous metals, cast iron and steel from corrosion

• Nitrate – protects against pitting and crevice attack in aluminum components

• Nitrite – prevents cylinder-liner pitting in cast-iron components in heavy duty engines

• Organic acids – used as a replacement for other inhibitors, such as silicate/silicone, nitrites, nitrate, phosphates, amines and borates
Thank you SWPFLIPPER, you have added to the technical knowledge base. Do you have a specific coolant, other than Kubota's private labeled brand, that meets all the requirements for use in our Kubota's INCLUDING topping off a factory filled cooling system?
 

BruceP

Active member

Equipment
G5200H
Aug 7, 2016
597
146
43
Richmond, Vermont, USA
I can attest to the wise words of "swpflipper"

There are MANY varied brews used as antifreeze and some of them are NOT campatable. Mixing them can cause jelling which will plug up passagways within the engine.

In reference to a DIESEL engine, one problem with a sleeved(lined) engine can be cavitation around the sleeves. This cavitation leads to corrosion and failure of the sleeves. Hence, some antifreeze types were SPECIFICALLY developed to address this cavitation problem.

(A "sleeve/liner" is the replaceable cylinder in which a piston rides)

BEWARE: Relying on the COLOR of the antifreeze is NOT a good way to determine its chemical make-up.

Bottom line: Know what is in your engines and keep some around to use for topping up.

Much of this antifreeze info also translates to automobile engines too!!! (not the sleeves :)
 

GeoHorn

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
M4700DT, LA1002FEL, Ferguson5-8B Compactor-Roller, 10KDumpTrailer, RTV-X900
May 18, 2018
3,151
1,067
113
Texas
I don’t think (correct me if I’m wrong) that Kubotas are wet-sleeved engines so special anti-freeze is not required. Ordinary Prestone is just fine.... or Zerex...or other... etc.

I do have a wet-sleeved JD engine in a compactor/roller and I have no idea what antifreeze is in it since I bought it a couple years ago. I used a test-strip to confirm it is still freeze-protected and another test-strip to confirm it has sufficient nitrites to prevent sleeve-cavitation... but I plan to replace the antifreeze this year sometime. It has a 3/8” recirculation-line that passes all coolant thru a spin-on filter which contains pellets of what I presume to be “SCAs” ... and I have a replacement filter for when I do the coolant-change.
Anyway.... the curious thing happened when I drove to the JD dealer to buy genuine JD AntiFreeze (thinking I‘d be “safe” buying THEIR stuff) .... and the manager AND the parts guy both asked me ”What COLOR is the present anti-freeze?” :rolleyes:
So much for “assuming” the JD dealer and his parts guy would be knowledgeable about such things.
:cautious:

(I left without purchasing anything from those guys.)
 
Last edited:

19thSF

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650, loader, MMM, heavy hitch, pallet forks, piranha tooth bar, rear blade
Mar 1, 2020
291
70
28
Glendale, Rhode Island
Well, we certainly have a lot of technical information. Thank you to those who provided it. We still, however are left with the question that started the conversation.
Can anyone name a specific coolant (Brand and type) to use in our Kubota's (including topping off factory filled cooling systems) other than the Kubota (private branded by CCI MFG) coolant?
 

freewheel3

Active member

Equipment
MX5000DT LA852, BX1800D, B6000DT, B6200HSTD, B7100HSTD, L185, T1700HX, ZD1211
Mar 9, 2013
334
32
28
Alberta
Well, we certainly have a lot of technical information. Thank you to those who provided it. We still, however are left with the question that started the conversation.
Can anyone name a specific coolant (Brand and type) to use in our Kubota's (including topping off factory filled cooling systems) other than the Kubota (private branded by CCI MFG) coolant?
This is what my Kubota dealer here in Canada sells and told me they use in all of their equipment.
turbo.jpg
5050.jpg
 

swpflipper

Active member

Equipment
MX5400 HST, LA1065 FEL, HR2572 box blade - S30 flip Screen
Nov 3, 2020
100
50
28
Arizona
Thank you SWPFLIPPER, you have added to the technical knowledge base. Do you have a specific coolant, other than Kubota's private labeled brand, that meets all the requirements for use in our Kubota's INCLUDING topping off a factory filled cooling system?
I do not have the best answerer for everyone's Kubota.
For me, My fleet consists of diesel Cat, Cummins, Isuzu and our sweepers have auxiliary engines from Kubota and John Deer. I have gone with a Heavy Duty Extended service OAT. Any vehicle that I am concerned about the improper mix is being flushed and replaced.
You can also get test strips to test chemical compound.
If I was not dealing with 40 different engines, I would never worry about having a couple different coolants on hand.
You can not go wrong topping off with distilled water. If you find you need to add more than two quarts you need to be looking for the cause and repair.
I will continue with the existing coolant in my new MX until service time or a repairer. At that Time I will change it over. I tried looking up the Kubota technology and I believe it is HOAT, but I could not confirm.
if you do happen to mix colors. you will likely end up with brown in your system
 

swpflipper

Active member

Equipment
MX5400 HST, LA1065 FEL, HR2572 box blade - S30 flip Screen
Nov 3, 2020
100
50
28
Arizona
Well, we certainly have a lot of technical information. Thank you to those who provided it. We still, however are left with the question that started the conversation.
Can anyone name a specific coolant (Brand and type) to use in our Kubota's (including topping off factory filled cooling systems) other than the Kubota (private branded by CCI MFG) coolant?
Most products do a great job of hiding what technology they use. If I could find the type that Kubota is, this would be easy. This scares you to buy their product. Especially the popular automotive brands. You get more information of the technology with the brands made for Heavy truck. Both Peak Fleet Charge and Prestone Command have a lot of information. Also Cummins Fleet guard
 

19thSF

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650, loader, MMM, heavy hitch, pallet forks, piranha tooth bar, rear blade
Mar 1, 2020
291
70
28
Glendale, Rhode Island
Most products do a great job of hiding what technology they use. If I could find the type that Kubota is, this would be easy. This scares you to buy their product. Especially the popular automotive brands. You get more information of the technology with the brands made for Heavy truck. Both Peak Fleet Charge and Prestone Command have a lot of information. Also Cummins Fleet guard
Well, I have named the manufacturer, and quoted the MDS sheet. Would it be helpful if I post the MDS sheet in its entirety?
 

MSG H

Member

Equipment
L3901 HST RETIRED MIL.
Dec 20, 2020
45
20
8
VA
This is what my Kubota dealer here in Canada sells and told me they use in all of their equipment. View attachment 53365 View attachment 53366
The Turbo Power jug in the picture is 50/50 premixed, label shows “DO NOT ADD WATER”. And doesn’t display LLC. So the manual says “Premix 50% LLC and 50% clean soft water“. Premixes shouldn’t require water, just flush system 2 to 3 times with water a pour straight from the premix jug. No?
 

swpflipper

Active member

Equipment
MX5400 HST, LA1065 FEL, HR2572 box blade - S30 flip Screen
Nov 3, 2020
100
50
28
Arizona
Well, I have named the manufacturer, and quoted the MDS sheet. Would it be helpful if I post the MDS sheet in its entirety?
I don't know, maybe. I am just breaking them down into the 4 categories (for diesel). From what you posted, you identified the Kubota product as having "Hydrated inorganic acid" I would think that would make it an IAT (Inorganic Acid Technology). The product the OP asked about is an HOAT (according to Zerx). I would question if he can mix them. I do not think a top off would hurt. Note that both require SCA's to be added occasionally.
If the Kubota MDS sheet were available, the OP or anyone could send that question to a supplier to ask what product they have to work with it.
 

Thunder chicken

Active member

Equipment
M7060
Dec 29, 2019
202
68
28
Northern ontario

freewheel3

Active member

Equipment
MX5000DT LA852, BX1800D, B6000DT, B6200HSTD, B7100HSTD, L185, T1700HX, ZD1211
Mar 9, 2013
334
32
28
Alberta
The Turbo Power jug in the picture is 50/50 premixed, label shows “DO NOT ADD WATER”. And doesn’t display LLC. So the manual says “Premix 50% LLC and 50% clean soft water“. Premixes shouldn’t require water, just flush system 2 to 3 times with water a pour straight from the premix jug. No?
The pic from the manual was sent to me by the parts girl when she sent me the pic of the antifreeze that they use. I'm not sure of the context, but it appears that's the procedure Kubota recommends if you were switching to an LLC, maybe?
Either way, the owner of the dealership told me they use that brand in all the diesel powered equipment they sell / service.
Their mechanic came to my place to do a recall on the coolant reservoir on my ZD1211 mower and that's the stuff he topped it up with, for what that's worth.
 

Russell King

Well-known member

Equipment
L185F, Modern Ag Competitor 4’ shredder, Rhino tiller, rear dirt scoop
Jun 17, 2012
2,892
298
83
Austin, Texas
The Turbo Power jug in the picture is 50/50 premixed, label shows “DO NOT ADD WATER”. And doesn’t display LLC. So the manual says “Premix 50% LLC and 50% clean soft water“. Premixes shouldn’t require water, just flush system 2 to 3 times with water a pour straight from the premix jug. No?
First picture is antifreeze mug of 50/50 premixed long life coolant.
Second picture is Kubota manual requireing to put 50/50 mix into tractor and giving instructions on what to dilute concentrate with.

Kubota manual may have been in existence before premixed anti freeze.

On my Nissan Frontier 2016 vintage the owners manual states that they use their branded Blue extended life and it has a 7 year life. But they have green long life that is good for 3 years (may have been 4). It can be used with the blue but if mixed then life is per green at 3 years.

That falls under the idiots guide to making thing way more complicated than they needed to. Never stated what type of anti freeze it was. Frustrating at best