To 4WD or Not To 4WD

Old_Paint

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Lifetime Member

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LX2610HSDSU, LA535 FEL w/54" bucket, LandPride BB1248, Woodland Mills WC-68
Dec 5, 2020
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AL
I have recieved, like yours, great advice pertaining to the use of the 4wd. I have had 4wd trucks for a long time, I am familiar with not driving them in 4wd on highway(without snow, etc.) and what sharpe turns do to them in that situation. I have been using a 60 year old tractor, no 4wd, for past 15+ years for minor duties such as gardening, dragging 300’ of driveway. I have a new tractor with 1 hour on it, unlike anything I have ever owned, so thought it to be wise to ask / present what I want to do with it for this project. Inexperience can be dangerous to self or equipment, so I try to be educated, not afraid to admit my weaknesses. I don’t consider myself dumb but may be perceived that way by some of my questions. Had a teacher in community college that always said “The only dumb questions are the ones not asked”. Did I think Kubota would put an axle, gears, 4wd on that tractor with a loader that couldn’t handle its intended purpose? NO! I do know there are intended procedures Kubota expects you to follow. I can read their owner manual, videos, which will not cover all situations. I much rather get my eduction from the folks on this site that have been there, done that, If they are willing to offer just as your self. Your knowledge is invaluable. As to the drive, we had 2 estimates to redo it before the economic boom (Thank you President Trump) both were in the $5k range including removal of old concrete. Landfill is 10 miles from our location. Contractor that poured our pad was asked to estimate doing the driveway before pouring pad. He stated his work was backed up so badly he would come back later and do the drive. He never contacted us, so I called to ask for the estimate and how back logged he was now. That’s the $17k estimate and was ready to start next day. I took it he is still backed logged with work, really didn’t want to mess with it at a reasonable price. Again, educated here on gravel, have had so many doors opened to materials. Looking at #57 to #67, supposed to take wife to meet hopefully next weekend with stone supplier, she can see the opinions. Sorry for the ramble, hell you may not even be reading it at this point!
Oh yeah, I am still reading. I didn't mean to come across as a smartarse either. The written word seldom conveys the intent or demeanor of the writer. I know more about you and your situation now than I did from your original post, and was just pointing out that the regulations for selling equipment now are a lot different from what they were when your 60 year old tractor was built. If the tractor couldn't carry it, there's no way Kubota could legally sell that tractor with a front end loader. Somebody in grey market, possibly, even probably. Buyer beware if it isn't new.

I drove an old 8N and an older Cub Farmall as a kid, neither of which had 4WD either. I get your meaning about the new machines being beasts in comparison. My little LX has more horsepower than both the old tractors put together, albeit, that heavy old 8N would probably still drag it backward.

Yep, like I said, hindsight is 20/20, and finding the right contractor at the right time is always tricky if not like catching the goose that lays golden eggs. The contractor I used showed up at 0700 on Friday morning. The first 9 yards of concrete from a (previously) reputable company finally showed up around 1100, despite a 0900 delivery promise. We all noticed pea gravel in it, meaning it was left overs from a pour that was exposed aggregate. That meant it probably had retardant in it. The next 6 yards showed up and took an enormous amount of water to wet enough for screeding because it had way too much sand in it (and retardant). 2300 that night, it finally set enough to get it flat and I told the contractor to go home and get some rest and come back to deal with the surface after it was cured a little more. The missus fed them twice that day on a job that shouldn't have taken more than a couple hours. I wasn't angry at all at the contractor, but at the supplier, I was furious. The contractor brought his finisher back on Sunday morning to finish polishing the slab. We probably should have broadcast some portland on the end where the second load went to glaze it better.

What was funny was when he showed up to bid the job. He tried to hire me to build his forms and do site prep for him, LOL. That can be some of the hardest part of the job if you don't have a flat place to pour, or if there's irregular shapes involved. I put myself through college building swimming pools and pouring concrete. I swore I'd never do it again after I got my degree. That work rates right up there (or down as the case may be) with coal mining.

67 might be the best stone for allowing silt/sand to wash through, and less likely to catch in the tires. The coarser the better, except for the part of walking on it. Too course may make you or the missus twist an ankle. BUT, you still don't want gravel right up to the edge of the pad. I kick/sweep more 57 back out of my shop now than I care to mention. Even my little riding mower drags it in. Dunno if you plan on bringing your tractor in across that or not, but depending on the tread (Turf, R1, R4 or R14), you may pick up bigger rocks and bring them in. I pick pretty good size rocks outta my R-14's frequently. All food for thought before investing in a floor coating that has the threat of nearby gravel. Your floor, though. I wanted to coat mine too, but once I saw how much gravel was coming in and how much mud from using the tractor, I talked myself out of it. Just keep it in the back of your head though, eventually, you're going to have to scrape and recondition that gravel. Dirt and silt will eventually fill in around the gravel and come to the top as well as the gravel pushing down into the dirt.

Your doors are on the gable end, so you've already eliminated any possibility of roof runoff splatter being an issue with the doors. I put roll-up doors on for zero clearance on the opening, and fewer moving parts to give me trouble down the road. There isn't much price difference, and I can't say I'd do it again because of sealing issues with the rollups on the sides. I get some water in the building when we have a blowing rain, which is often in winter. Just a little heads up for your consideration before you spend your bucks on doors (if you haven't already). I like the roll-ups for their intended purpose, but they don't seal as well as garage doors. Maybe not meant to, because they're just thin sheet metal. If you plan to heat the garage, you're going to waste a lot of energy on doors that don't seal. I would strongly recommend at least 8 feet of concrete apron across the door openings where you can stop the tractor and wash some of the mud off if you still go forward with the floor coating. If you've never washed a tractor, though, just be ready to wash off the side of your garage too. Tractor washing is an experiment in mud splattering. But an apron will give more time for the gravel to fall out of the tires or at least to let you see it and will help with erosion splatter around the doors. Mine is a lot better now that most of the surface dirt has washed through the 59 that I used, but for a while it was making a mess on the doors and vinyl.

Here's what I did. No drive going to it, so I just put gravel in to keep the tractor from making a muddy mess. I ran a 4" perf pipe across the front edge of the gravel to drain the water from left to right and get rid of any that wants to stand in the gravel.

IMG_2825.JPG
 

RCW

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BX2360, FEL, MMM, BX2750D snowblower. 1953 Minneapolis Moline ZAU
Apr 28, 2013
6,429
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Chenango County, NY
Roger - -

The old 'Moline is just that to me....my heritage.

We all have our stories....the 'Moline is mine.

I feel fortunate to have it. It's not worth much, much means a lot to me.
 
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HVACRoger

Active member

Equipment
2021 L2501 Loader, Backhoe, LandPride Grapple, Tiller, Forks, Quick Connect
Dec 20, 2021
174
95
28
Wilson, NC
Oh yeah, I am still reading. I didn't mean to come across as a smartarse either. The written word seldom conveys the intent or demeanor of the writer. I know more about you and your situation now than I did from your original post, and was just pointing out that the regulations for selling equipment now are a lot different from what they were when your 60 year old tractor was built. If the tractor couldn't carry it, there's no way Kubota could legally sell that tractor with a front end loader. Somebody in grey market, possibly, even probably. Buyer beware if it isn't new.

I drove an old 8N and an older Cub Farmall as a kid, neither of which had 4WD either. I get your meaning about the new machines being beasts in comparison. My little LX has more horsepower than both the old tractors put together, albeit, that heavy old 8N would probably still drag it backward.

Yep, like I said, hindsight is 20/20, and finding the right contractor at the right time is always tricky if not like catching the goose that lays golden eggs. The contractor I used showed up at 0700 on Friday morning. The first 9 yards of concrete from a (previously) reputable company finally showed up around 1100, despite a 0900 delivery promise. We all noticed pea gravel in it, meaning it was left overs from a pour that was exposed aggregate. That meant it probably had retardant in it. The next 6 yards showed up and took an enormous amount of water to wet enough for screeding because it had way too much sand in it (and retardant). 2300 that night, it finally set enough to get it flat and I told the contractor to go home and get some rest and come back to deal with the surface after it was cured a little more. The missus fed them twice that day on a job that shouldn't have taken more than a couple hours. I wasn't angry at all at the contractor, but at the supplier, I was furious. The contractor brought his finisher back on Sunday morning to finish polishing the slab. We probably should have broadcast some portland on the end where the second load went to glaze it better.

What was funny was when he showed up to bid the job. He tried to hire me to build his forms and do site prep for him, LOL. That can be some of the hardest part of the job if you don't have a flat place to pour, or if there's irregular shapes involved. I put myself through college building swimming pools and pouring concrete. I swore I'd never do it again after I got my degree. That work rates right up there (or down as the case may be) with coal mining.

67 might be the best stone for allowing silt/sand to wash through, and less likely to catch in the tires. The coarser the better, except for the part of walking on it. Too course may make you or the missus twist an ankle. BUT, you still don't want gravel right up to the edge of the pad. I kick/sweep more 57 back out of my shop now than I care to mention. Even my little riding mower drags it in. Dunno if you plan on bringing your tractor in across that or not, but depending on the tread (Turf, R1, R4 or R14), you may pick up bigger rocks and bring them in. I pick pretty good size rocks outta my R-14's frequently. All food for thought before investing in a floor coating that has the threat of nearby gravel. Your floor, though. I wanted to coat mine too, but once I saw how much gravel was coming in and how much mud from using the tractor, I talked myself out of it. Just keep it in the back of your head though, eventually, you're going to have to scrape and recondition that gravel. Dirt and silt will eventually fill in around the gravel and come to the top as well as the gravel pushing down into the dirt.

Your doors are on the gable end, so you've already eliminated any possibility of roof runoff splatter being an issue with the doors. I put roll-up doors on for zero clearance on the opening, and fewer moving parts to give me trouble down the road. There isn't much price difference, and I can't say I'd do it again because of sealing issues with the rollups on the sides. I get some water in the building when we have a blowing rain, which is often in winter. Just a little heads up for your consideration before you spend your bucks on doors (if you haven't already). I like the roll-ups for their intended purpose, but they don't seal as well as garage doors. Maybe not meant to, because they're just thin sheet metal. If you plan to heat the garage, you're going to waste a lot of energy on doors that don't seal. I would strongly recommend at least 8 feet of concrete apron across the door openings where you can stop the tractor and wash some of the mud off if you still go forward with the floor coating. If you've never washed a tractor, though, just be ready to wash off the side of your garage too. Tractor washing is an experiment in mud splattering. But an apron will give more time for the gravel to fall out of the tires or at least to let you see it and will help with erosion splatter around the doors. Mine is a lot better now that most of the surface dirt has washed through the 59 that I used, but for a while it was making a mess on the doors and vinyl.

Here's what I did. No drive going to it, so I just put gravel in to keep the tractor from making a muddy mess. I ran a 4" perf pipe across the front edge of the gravel to drain the water from left to right and get rid of any that wants to stand in the gravel.

View attachment 73446
Old Paint...we cool!! I didn’t want to come off as facetiou, was still working on my first cup of coffee, so I might have. Sorry if so!! I can only imagine the back stories of a lot of us on this site which could change perceptions on/or the writings we share. This garage is at my coastal home so the Kubota will not be stored there, only while I move the dirt left over from the garage build and driveway / landscape project. This will store 3 vehicles, boat (which I just sold) tools, ice machine etc..and lawn maintenance tools. Speaking of perceptions, probably some rolling their eyes as if I’m filthy rich, braggadocios, self centered, etc., etc.. God has been good to me. I grew up very poor, parents divorced when I was 6 but both were there for me. Dad has 8th grade education but one of the smartest men I know. I went to community college, learned a trade, worked my way up through that company in 10 years, then started my own. My wife and I have never had any financial sums of money handed to us. Wife has 4 family members that received $250k or more in settlements, all are now financially challenged with not much to show for it. Raised 3 great kids, youngest works with me ME degree, middle is a hero to me, joined Army serve 2 tours in Iraq has become the man I never thought watching him as a kid. Daughter just graduated Liberty U with second degree masters. , primary degree in home interior design. YES, I am boisterous of them and blessed, wife and I worked very hard. When economy was good beginning with Reagan, my fellow business friends blew their money on cruises living large partying. Obama presidency put them all out of business. I payed off my house, cars, company and assets. Bought the house in our conversations in 09 when construction was horrible (went from 15 employees to 3), paid it off in 18 ( Thanks President Trump) still 3 employees. So there is some back story, folks can judge if need. Was it Popeye that said “ I ams what I ams”. My life has been interesting, best friends wife says all the time they should make a movie of your life. Bless her heart!
Back to the points, differently going with larger rock, at least #67, tractor tires are R4 but more concerned with the aggressive tires on the Wrangler. Will put down a geotextile in hopes that will control sinkage of stones and weed control. Think I will skip the epoxy floor color coating, just plain sealer, save that $5-6k. Building pad was poured with a 2” lip down at doors to seal out water or wind blowing it in on pad. I really like that!! Door contractor placed thick seal around doors so they are better than average. Building is well insulated, putting in 3 ton ductless heat pump, quite a bit more than needed but want it to recover quickly. Wife will use it for family gatherings. July, August, Sept. we easily have 95+ degree days @ 90%+ RH. Really like your well thought out suggestions, greatly appreciated. Your building looks great! Giving serious thought to concrete apron at building pad. If I had my Kubota at the time the building was being built things would have been different with the drive I believe. I think it is going to be better now. Got to figure out border materials next. Will stay in touch!!
 

HVACRoger

Active member

Equipment
2021 L2501 Loader, Backhoe, LandPride Grapple, Tiller, Forks, Quick Connect
Dec 20, 2021
174
95
28
Wilson, NC
Roger - -

The old 'Moline is just that to me....my heritage.

We all have our stories....the 'Moline is mine.

I feel fortunate to have it. It's not worth much, much means a lot to me.
I seem to bond with old items, especially cars&trucks and other misc items, if that is a thing. My kids get on my wife about the things I buy and drag home. Believe me I’m no hoarder, I know that’s what they all say. My wife tells my kids he a good man, not at the end of a bar drinking, running around with women, or gambling our money away. She tells them it makes him happy and I am going to enforce that!!
I love my wife!!
 
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