Straps or Chains for trailering?

GrappleDave

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Mar 19, 2022
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jackson NY
I use special axle straps, they have built in protectors for going around the axle , I have never torn one. I haul my lifted built Jeep across the country with the same straps. I hate chains!
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fried1765

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Where did you purchase the sleeves? thanks
Like most of us here on TBN, I found what I thought might be a better way, and made them myself!
My son does a lot of EPDM flat ( or nearly flat ) roofing, and has rolls of EPDM rubber roofing.
I simply cut pieces to my desired length and width, rolled and glued to make sleeves for the strap width.
 

fried1765

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mcmxi

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A good friend from my time in Hawaii who was in the Coastguard there gave me four really heavy duty military straps that they would use on C130s to secure cargo. I remember he had a Lazy Boy on a pallet and that was his seat for hundreds if not thousands of hours of flight time. I still have those straps, and when I reminded my friend recently about them, he told me that Uncle Sam needs them back! :LOL:

I use chains and binders to secure either tractor on the trailer. I use chains and binders for implements too. I like the ratcheting style binders.
 

GeoHorn

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The simple way is to just fly to Mexico, and walk across the border.
Everyone else is doing it!
That’s quite a bit more complex than simply walking across the northern border like terrorists used to do after arriving from overseas…. but if we do find ourselves in the company of a terrorist…. I suggest CHAINS AND BINDERS. :devilish:

”When it comes to talking about terrorism, Bergen says, focusing on the border doesn’t make sense. Every fatal terrorist attack on the United States since 9/11, he says, was carried out by a US citizen or legal resident.”

 

fried1765

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mcmxi

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I'm just curious about those that only use chain. Is it because of the abrasion resistance?
Here's a list off the top of my head why I like and use chains to secure heavy and expensive items, and why I rarely use straps. Just my opinion based on years of using both. I won't get into the merits of either when working underwater as a commercial diver and welder, a career I had for quite a few years, but for use with a trailer this is where I'm at.

1. Chains don't stretch compared to straps
2. Chains aren't affected by wind, rain, snow, sleet, oil or UV radiation
3. Chains are stronger (typically) and more durable - hence the reason why states requiring chains to secure trailers to trucks don't list straps as being a valid alternative
4. Chains are more versatile e.g. one chain can be used with two binders to secure two items
5. Chains are more resistant to cutting, chaffing etc.
6. Chains are easier to throw into a trailer box i.e. don't need to roll up
7. Chains are a lifetime purchase whereas straps wear out
8. Who cares about getting oil all over your chains
9. It's easier to deal with (pile up) unused sections of chain on the trailer than unused sections of strap that need to be knotted to prevent flapping in the wind
10. A binder is a lot stronger than a strap ratchet mechanism
 
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The Evil Twin

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L2501
Jul 19, 2022
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Virginia
Interesting about the strength. I use straps that are rated for 20k. A chain of the same rating would be really big.
I wonder if laws differ for car transport. Almost all I see use tire straps.
 

mcmxi

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Interesting about the strength. I use straps that are rated for 20k. A chain of the same rating would be really big.
I wonder if laws differ for car transport. Almost all I see use tire straps.
The strength thing is interesting. A strap is rated when new and more difficult to validate given the composite nature of many straps, and the rating doesn't account for any changes caused by UV, moisture, age, oil etc. The strength of a welded link chain will remain constant over its life, and has an infinite life if the stress is kept below 50% of the yield strength. Does this matter, who knows?

We're all free to use whatever we like based on many variables. I use straps sometimes, but chains mostly. One important thing to consider is where the load is secured. If at all possible it's best to have the load secured as low as possible i.e. the contact points between the load and straps/chains is as low as possible compared to the center of gravity of the load. Common knowledge I'm sure.
 

WoodKutter

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My reasons are simple. I have them. If I'm working with the tractor, more times than not I'm using chain. I'm not a farmer, and only use pto attachments a couple times a year. If you have attachment points, no worry of scrathing. I'm sure properly rated straps would work just as well if kept clean and out of sunlight when not being used.
 

Lil Foot

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Here's a list off the top of my head why I like and use chains to secure heavy and expensive items, and why I rarely use straps. Just my opinion based on years of using both. I won't get into the merits of either when working underwater as a commercial diver and welder, a career I had for quite a few years, but for use with a trailer this is where I'm at.

1. Chains don't stretch compared to straps
2. Chains aren't affected by wind, rain, snow, sleet, oil or UV radiation
3. Chains are stronger (typically) and more durable - hence the reason why states requiring chains to secure trailers to trucks don't list straps as being a valid alternative
4. Chains are more versatile e.g. one chain can be used with two binders to secure two items
5. Chains are more resistant to cutting, chaffing etc.
6. Chains are easier to throw into a trailer box i.e. don't need to roll up
7. Chains are a lifetime purchase whereas straps wear out
8. Who cares about getting oil all over your chains
9. It's easier to deal with (pile up) unused sections of chain on the trailer than unused sections of strap that need to be knotted to prevent flapping in the wind
10. A binder is a lot stronger than a strap ratchet mechanism
That pretty much sums up my reasons. Well said.

My reasons are simple. I have them.
And this.
 

Old_Paint

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I use ratchet straps now, but will be replacing them with chains and binders. I always used chains in the past. But I didn't have to move a tractor for a few years until this past year with my LX2610. So recently I bought straps for the LX because they were alot cheaper. I regret that.
In my opinion, straps take longer to fasten than chains.
Only drawback is they don't build- load mount points from the factory on these newer fancy tractors.
I'll be welding on some chain hooks onto my LX next year.

By the way, I'm 60 years old and chains and binders is my preferred method due to experience with both methods.
No need to weld. Somewhere on here I got the idea and implemented bolt on tow hooks that fit perfectly on the LX frame with safety latches in case something gets loose. It can’t come completely off. At the back, put a large clevis in the drawbar and attach the two straps for the rear there. I didn’t even have to drill anything. I also used Nylock nuts on the hooks so they couldn’t come off if the bolts found a way to get loose. The LX2610 weighs about 3000 lbs with loaded rear tires. Four 6000 pound straps should do just fine holding the tractor, and proper placement of D-rings on your trailer should keep them from rubbing. Just make sure the D-rings are attached to the frame or have very large backing plates. Not only should you make sure the 3ph is fully down, also make sure any implement on the 3PH is securely on the deck or cribbed up so it cannot bounce on the lift. Same goes for the bucket, but there’s not nearly as much risk for damage to the tractor on the FEL as there is on the lift. Cribbing either makes sure no force is put on either end of the tractor. Additional D-rings may be needed to tie down the bucket and 3PH implement. 10000 pound D-rings will hold anything straps will.
 
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The Evil Twin

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L2501
Jul 19, 2022
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375
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Virginia
The strength thing is interesting. A strap is rated when new and more difficult to validate given the composite nature of many straps, and the rating doesn't account for any changes caused by UV, moisture, age, oil etc. The strength of a welded link chain will remain constant over its life, and has an infinite life if the stress is kept below 50% of the yield strength. Does this matter, who knows?

We're all free to use whatever we like based on many variables. I use straps sometimes, but chains mostly. One important thing to consider is where the load is secured. If at all possible it's best to have the load secured as low as possible i.e. the contact points between the load and straps/chains is as low as possible compared to the center of gravity of the load. Common knowledge I'm sure.
Yeah, I see that. Given mine are always in a container in the garage and they are 5x the rating needed for anything I haul, they'll be good for a looooong time.
Wonder if anyone measures their chain stretch 😉
 

mcmxi

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Yeah, I see that. Given mine are always in a container in the garage and they are 5x the rating needed for anything I haul, they'll be good for a looooong time.
Wonder if anyone measures their chain stretch 😉
Good point! Hard to know if the links deform under load, or whether the links move relative to each other as tension is applied to the chain, or a combination of the two. I don't think there's a right or wrong answer here as long as whatever is used is able to keep the load secured and on the trailer. The rest is personal preference perhaps based more on factors unrelated to the load in question.

Here's an interesting reference for those of us that use chains. I use Grade 70 chains but Grade 80 are available too.