Glyphosate may not be so safe after all :(

Biker1mike

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The judges act on the data and facts presented by both parties.
Groups including the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Center for Food Safety and the Rural Coalition, which represents farmworkers brought the case and the EPA had some flawed arguments.
Once the EPA admitted some of their data was "inconclusive" their case was lost.
The government recently slashed the EPA budget and manpower in an action to castrate the department, Looks like like they did a good job of.
 
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Daren Todd

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I think if my wife was still alive, she would argue with you about it causing cancer
My mom spread it for several years commercially. Didn't really take any precautions for wind and exposure. Just drove around a housing development that was under construction on a tractor spraying fence lines.

She was diagnosed a few years later with non Hodgkins lymphoma. Thankfully after a years worth of chemo, they knocked it into remission.

After seeing all those commercials for class action lawsuits, it makes you wonder. 🤔🤔🤔🤔
 

old and tired

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I've been wanting to reply for a while... but my opinion might not be what you want to hear... I've been around RoundUp for my whole career. In the beginning, Glyphosate, a salt, I don't think causes cancer.

RoundUp has TONS of adjuvants that were add to Glyphosate to make it work better. Stickers and spreaders (wetting agents), penetrants to make it absorb better, then others for rain fastness, adhesion and stabilizing agents.

Add all those "inert" chemicals together, you have the carcinogenic RoundUp formulation that you have today... But Glyphosate, by itself, IMHO, is not the problem.
 

jyoutz

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in canada we have warning labels on imported products that say "this product is known in the state of california to possibly cause cancer" or something along those lines.

in california EVERYTHING causes cancer...
I recently got a new Case pocketknife. It had that “known to cause cancer to the State of California “ warning. Go figure.
 
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Biker1mike

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I recently got a new Case pocketknife. It had that “known to cause cancer to the State of California “ warning. Go figure.
The California law was poorly written.
Your blade is most likely stainless steel which contains Chromium. Elemental Chromium is hazardous.
The brass on the handle contains lead. Again elemental lead is hazardous.
The factory knows that there is no way the steel or brass is going to break down but they have to admit the metals were use for part for the process.
Laws this poorly written give us tree huggers a bad name.
 
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Botamon

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The California law was poorly written.
Your blade is most likely stainless steel which contains Chromium. Elemental Chromium is hazardous.
The brass on the handle contains lead. Again elemental lead is hazardous.
The factory knows that there is no way the steel or brass is going to break down but they have to admit the metals were use for part for the process.
Laws this poorly written give us tree huggers a bad name.
Stupid laws like that put Nevada at the top of the list for pollutants. Why? Because of the huge mines in northern Nevada. The way the federal law is written, every bucket of dirt that is moved at a mine site has to be reported as a "hazardous release", even if it is just topsoil. I worked at a copper mine for 20+ years, for every pound of copper we processed many tons of earth had to be moved. And every ton had to be reported as a pollutant, a "hazardous release". Right now this applies only to the mining industry - just think if the powers-that-be decide that all farmers, or all construction companies, need to report all the earth they disturb as a "hazardous release"!
 

Borane4

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The California law was poorly written.
Laws this poorly written give us tree huggers a bad name.
Prop 65 was put into law in California 36 years ago. Imagine how many 10's of millions of prop 65 stickers have adorned everything from stainless steel kitchen forks to Starbucks coffee? The law certainly was poorly written, but dumb-assed legislators once corrected, should set about to fix it. In this case no. CA is happy to keep rolling with silly Prop 65 warnings after a generation. Starbucks coffee...really?