EYE BOLT ATTATCHMENT

Dave_eng

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
M7040, Nuffield 465
Oct 6, 2012
4,331
488
83
Williamstown Ontario Canada
Sorry but I do not understand your photo, where the eye bolt is fastened and how. Size of the eye bolt and if it has a shoulder.

Others may recognize the location.

Dave
 
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Dave_eng

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
M7040, Nuffield 465
Oct 6, 2012
4,331
488
83
Williamstown Ontario Canada
This is a 1” lifting eye that broke on us lowering a piece of ductile iron pipe out of a ceiling attached to a chain fall. It almost killed me. It went the slightest bit crooked. And let go. Take note, this is USA made
My concerns are explained by this real life situation.

Hardware used for lifting needs to be selected with a completely different perspective than hardware used for pulling. A 3/8" or 1/2" eye bolt does not have the safety margin to absorb bucket curl which puts the applied load at an angle.

Take simple winches as another example, most contain a caution against use for lifting overhead. while having ratings for thousands of pounds.

New Bobcat excavators claim to come with a factory eye for lifting. I have not seen this yet but rest assured Bobcat engineers would have spent a long time on this detail.

It is great that Richard came out of this failure shaken but not broken. Thanks for sharing.

Dave
 
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Orange man hero

Member

Equipment
LX2610HSD
Mar 12, 2021
181
22
18
Wasilla, Alaska
My concerns are explained by this real life situation.

Hardware used for lifting needs to be selected with a completely different perspective than hardware used for pulling. A 3/8" or 1/2" eye bolt does not have the safety margin to absorb bucket curl which puts the applied load at an angle.

Take simple winches as another example, most contain a caution against use for lifting overhead. while having ratings for thousands of pounds.

New Bobcat excavators claim to come with a factory eye for lifting. I have not seen this yet but rest assured Bobcat engineers would have spent a long time on this detail.

It is great that Richard came out of this failure shaken but not broken. Thanks for sharing.

Dave
Yes, this is VERY GOOD to know. I know that you should not lift with an eyebolt at an angle and that is why the hooks are so thick and a proven implement if you want to call them that. This would be ok if you only pull from the bottom and at no angle at all. Probably only for the careful worker and I have noticed that there a quite a few not careful ones out there. Yes, you are right on the bucket curl and it probably is not a good way to go for this and the drag across the grown reason.
 

Orange man hero

Member

Equipment
LX2610HSD
Mar 12, 2021
181
22
18
Wasilla, Alaska
Yes, this is VERY GOOD to know. I know that you should not lift with an eyebolt at an angle and that is why the hooks are so thick and a proven implement if you want to call them that. This would be ok if you only pull from the bottom and at no angle at all. Probably only for the careful worker and I have noticed that there a quite a few not careful ones out there. Yes, you are right on the bucket curl and it probably is not a good way to go for this and the drag across the grown reason.
The problem I see is that I think the attachment point weather it a hook eye bolt or whatever if mounted on the top of the bucket will give you less distance on how high your bucket will lift? Or does it give you more or the same? Also you need a long chain to drop the load below the bottom lip of the bucket? Also the bottom lip location gives you better visibility of the load? Maybe the broke eye bolts were very overloaded also? Am I wrong on some of this?