Drill Chuck for 1/2" Impact Wrench?

imnukensc

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Anyone use a drill chuck on a 1/2" air impact wrench? I need to drill some holes to attach some 6x6 post anchors in some very old concrete. I don't have a decent hammer drill so thought I'd use my air impact. Bad idea? Good idea? Any recommendations?
 

Dustball

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Impact would spin way too fast for concrete and you wouldn't get any hammering action. You'll just burn the tip up and spend way too much time.

I suggest renting a rotary hammer and bit from a local rental place for an afternoon. There's no comparison between a rotary hammer and a hammer drill.
 
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North Idaho Wolfman

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Impact would spin way too fast for concrete and you wouldn't get any hammering action. You'll just burn the tip up and spend way too much time.

I suggest renting a rotary hammer and bit from a local rental place for an afternoon. There's no comparison between a rotary hammer and a hammer drill.
I agree a rotary is the best for concrete, But because it's air, he can use water to cool the tip and you can turn the speed down on most impacts.
 

Dustball

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I agree a rotary is the best for concrete, But because it's air, he can use water to cool the tip and you can turn the speed down on most impacts.
I see where you're coming from. I'd be interested to see how the OP fares with this method.

Should point out that the chuck you linked to says it's not for use with impact drivers- it's more of a 'quick-change' application. Not sure why they distinguish between an impact wrench or an impact driver.
 

fatjay

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I just bought a corded milwaukee hammer drill on fb marketplace for $40. It's not SDS but it did the job. I needed to drill about 60 holes 6" deep and 1/2" diameter in concrete that was poured in 1964 to stick rebar pins in a retaining wall I was putting up.

Totally worth it. Check out the used market. Everyone is going battery these days, corded stuff going cheap.

 

chim

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Without more information, My choice would be an SDS rotary hammer It'll make up to 5/8" holes in concrete in a jiffy.
 

lynnmor

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For a one time use I would get a cheap corded Harbor Freight hammer drill. If it dies they will give you a new one.
 
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GeoHorn

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For a one time use I would get a cheap corded Harbor Freight hammer drill. If it dies they will give you a new one.
This is what I did to drill 1/2” holes in rock…. 34 of ‘em…. a foot deep. Worked fine…. Bauer Hammer Drill…. good tool.
 
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RCW

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For a one time use I would get a cheap corded Harbor Freight hammer drill. If it dies they will give you a new one.
I did this for some project years ago. Rotary hammer. Maybe $60-70 (?) with bits and coupon.

Gotten several uses out it since, so consider myself ahead of the game.
 

NCL4701

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I have an old Milwaukee spline shank rotary hammer that can be operated with or without rotation. As others have stated, that’s the type thing you really need.

Thing I’m not getting about how an impact wrench would work is the “hammer/impact” part of a rotary hammer and impact wrench are totally different. For a rotary hammer the impact is front to back, more like a Sawzall than an impact wrench. I can turn the rotation off on mine and use it with a chisel or bull point as a small demolition hammer. It’s that jack hammer chiseling motion of the rotary hammer that allows it to efficiently punch holes in masonry and stone.

An impact wrench hammers in the plane of rotation. That’s great for busting a stuck nut loose but doesn’t do anything but spin a drill bit against a concrete slab.

Rent, buy, or borrow a rotary hammer.
 
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Runs With Scissors

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I don't think its a "bad" idea necessarily, but what is the advantage to using an impact?

A rotary hammer drill "pounds into" the work, but an impact won't do that....At least all the impacts I have ever owned did not.


Anyway, IMHO if this is a "limited use" tool, I would go with a HF special.
 

Smokeydog

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Not particularly for the OP’s application but I had to drill some 5/8” holes in a TLB subframe to mount an attachment bracket. Frame about 1/2” thick. Not reachable using a drill and would have required extensive disassembly. Used pneumatic impact wrench with extensions and universal joint to drive a holesaw. Removed the center drill bit, In a scrap plate of steel drilled a 5/8” hole for a holesaw guide and clamped this to the frame. Liberal use of cutting oil it drilled holes surprisingly easy and quick thru the frame. <1 minute per hole.
Have used the guide block and holesaw method to drill holes in thick metal several times. Re-bore worn egg shaped holes for a larger bolt.
 
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GeoHorn

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I don't think its a "bad" idea necessarily, but what is the advantage to using an impact?

A rotary hammer drill "pounds into" the work, but an impact won't do that....At least all the impacts I have ever owned did not.


Anyway, IMHO if this is a "limited use" tool, I would go with a HF special.
I don’t see an advantage… but I see a potential DIS-advantage….. Damage to the Impact Wrench due to lateral-effort (pressing against the object) ….applied to a tool designed primarily to impart “torque”. The tool is not designed as a “hammer”.

(I can’t tell the number of times I’ve instructed my family members to Stop using the Incorrect-Tool for the job…. I.E., using a screwdriver as a chisel…. or pliers to twist a hex-head fastener… etc.)