Towing B2601 with 14 ft trailer - SA or TA

TRUCK3

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First post on the forums - been reading for a while since I starting looking at compact tractors. I narrowed things down to likely a B2601 or even possibly the B2401. Problem is I don't plan to purchase until later this summer or fall but my current steel 18 yr old 5x8 trailer is almost no longer roadworthy. I need to purchase a replacement trailer soon.

I drive a Toyota 4Runner with a 5K lb tow rating. My rough calculations show I can tow say a B2601 w/loader and a box blade, but I need to keep the trailer weight down to as close to 1K lbs as possible. This leaves either a steel single axle 5k GVWR or a 7K tandem aluminum. Issue with tandem aluminum is the cost. Seems to be pushing 2x for an aluminum TA vs. steel SA. A 16 ft steel tandem would be a good option, but weighs too much to use with the 4Runner in my opinion considering remaining payload.

I know the T4R is not the ideal tow vehicle, but I'm not ready to upgrade at this point, so I want to find a trailer that works with it if at all possible.

So I was looking for any feedback from those who have towed a similar tractor with a 14 ft trailer. 16 ft. would likely be better, but looking to see if 14 ft. is still doable. Thanks in advance for any comments.
 

B737

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This is a B2601 with BB being towed on a 16' trailer.

this trailer weighed around 1800 pounds I believe. It had two 3,500 pound axles. Towed fine, only a few inches of room left over. Sold this trailer weeks later as it was too small and went to a 20' aluminum trailer. Sold the F150 months later and went to an F250. Ordered a 22' trailer 2 years later, and will sell the aluminum one this June :ROFLMAO: I'll get it right sooner or later.

 
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TRUCK3

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This is a B2601 with BB being towed on a 16' trailer.

this trailer weighed around 1800 pounds I believe. It had two 3,500 pound axles. Towed fine, only a few inches of room left over. Sold this trailer weeks later as it was too small and went to a 20' aluminum trailer. Sold the F150 months later and went to an F250. Ordered a 22' trailer 2 years later, and will sell the aluminum one this June :ROFLMAO: I'll get it right sooner or later.

Thanks for the reply B737 - any idea what the total weight of the trailer and tractor were with the 16 ft'r? Not sure if it would keep me under 5K lbs total.
 

B737

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B2601 1600 lbs + loader w bucket 600 lbs + BB1260 340 lbs + trailer 1800 lbs = 4,340 lbs (roughly)
 

GreensvilleJay

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Instead of buying 'off the lot', can you have a trailer custom made ? if so , you can 'lose' a LOT of weight. especially if this trailer is designed to ONLY carry YOUR tractor. 'Tricks' like making it narrow, no center line decking, so side walls, Al jump ramps,Al fenders,etc. can shave a lot of pounds off.
I would ADD brakes to the 2nd axles though AND backup lights.
 

B737

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can you have a trailer custom made ? if so , you can 'lose' a LOT of weight. especially if this trailer is designed to ONLY carry YOUR tractor. 'Tricks' like making it narrow, no center line decking, so side walls, Al jump ramps,Al fenders,etc. can shave a lot of pounds off. I would ADD brakes to the 2nd axles though AND backup lights.
The 1800 lb trailer shown above had only about 6" of extra width between the fenders on each side. It had aluminum fenders. Brakes on both axles, I don't think I've ever seen a trailer with only one set of brakes :rolleyes: 🥴 . The utility rail on that trailer was removable and weighed about 100 lbs. I guess you could delete the loading ramp to save 200 pounds, and load your tractor with magic 🧙‍♂️. Lastly, remove the center decking to save 40 pounds so you can slip and break your ankle. Well done, Jay.

@TRUCK3 if every pound counts, I think you have to shop for an aluminum trailer. The reason why I bought my aluminum trailer was because the F150 was sensitive to weight. When I loaded up the 20'er, it didn't take much for the trailer to push the truck around. Once I got the F250 the weight of the trailer became irrelevant.

I think aluminum is the way to go. If you are only bringing small implements like a BB, 16' might do, but forget about a brush hog or rake. Tractors don't weigh much, but we need the length.

This 20' trailer weighs the same as the 16' steel one. It is too short, by about 6", as the rake is angled hanging off the back between the ramps.
 
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TRUCK3

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Thanks for the info- looks like I might need to move up to a 16' aluminum TA. Probably need the extra 2' over the 14' and the upcharge on the aluminum over steel is much less than upgrading the T4R right now.
 

GreensvilleJay

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re: I don't think I've ever seen a trailer with only one set of brakes
come on up to Ontario EVERY 'standard' 7K tandem axle trailer ONLY has brakes on ONE axle. that's how their made here. doesn't matter be they 'landscaper', 'utility', car hauler' or 'dump' NONE have brakes on all four wheels. Mfr's get to shave pennies,weight. and increase profits.
I know ,different land, different ways to make stuff. It does seem 'wrong' that brakes on both axles isn't a law.

Two problems with aluminum trailers. 1) they don't like salty roads and 2) they don't like being overstressed. Ontario's famous for dumping 1,000s of tons of salt on highways every day in winter. If you buy aluminum finds a fully qualified welder,something you won't find in the back roads of Northern Ontario,well what passes for roads.
I was offering a possible way to reduce the towing weight for the 4runner ,look at what you NEED not what someone else THINK's you want. There's no good reason to haul an extra 500# (or more) if you don't HAVE to.
 

Dieseldonato

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Here in the states anything over 3k lbs has to have brakes on all axles. Been like that for a very long time now.
 

JimmyJazz

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First post on the forums - been reading for a while since I starting looking at compact tractors. I narrowed things down to likely a B2601 or even possibly the B2401. Problem is I don't plan to purchase until later this summer or fall but my current steel 18 yr old 5x8 trailer is almost no longer roadworthy. I need to purchase a replacement trailer soon.

I drive a Toyota 4Runner with a 5K lb tow rating. My rough calculations show I can tow say a B2601 w/loader and a box blade, but I need to keep the trailer weight down to as close to 1K lbs as possible. This leaves either a steel single axle 5k GVWR or a 7K tandem aluminum. Issue with tandem aluminum is the cost. Seems to be pushing 2x for an aluminum TA vs. steel SA. A 16 ft steel tandem would be a good option, but weighs too much to use with the 4Runner in my opinion considering remaining payload.

I know the T4R is not the ideal tow vehicle, but I'm not ready to upgrade at this point, so I want to find a trailer that works with it if at all possible.

So I was looking for any feedback from those who have towed a similar tractor with a 14 ft trailer. 16 ft. would likely be better, but looking to see if 14 ft. is still doable. Thanks in advance for any comments.
My new B2601 came with loaded rear tires. I am unsure of the additional weight it adds but you should be mindful and include this in your calculations. I was told this is standard at the dealership when selling loader equipped tractors. Good luck.
 
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Dieseldonato

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For what it's worth I was told 15 gallons of rimguard per 12t 16.5 tire. 11 pounds per gallon. 15x2 tires =30 gallons x11 ponds per gallon 330lbs in the tires.
 
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TRUCK3

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re: I don't think I've ever seen a trailer with only one set of brakes
come on up to Ontario EVERY 'standard' 7K tandem axle trailer ONLY has brakes on ONE axle. that's how their made here. doesn't matter be they 'landscaper', 'utility', car hauler' or 'dump' NONE have brakes on all four wheels. Mfr's get to shave pennies,weight. and increase profits.
I know ,different land, different ways to make stuff. It does seem 'wrong' that brakes on both axles isn't a law.

Two problems with aluminum trailers. 1) they don't like salty roads and 2) they don't like being overstressed. Ontario's famous for dumping 1,000s of tons of salt on highways every day in winter. If you buy aluminum finds a fully qualified welder,something you won't find in the back roads of Northern Ontario,well what passes for roads.
I was offering a possible way to reduce the towing weight for the 4runner ,look at what you NEED not what someone else THINK's you want. There's no good reason to haul an extra 500# (or more) if you don't HAVE to.
Thanks for the input Greensville. I agree, I need to keep trailer weight down given the T4R's 5k tow rating. 1000-1500 lbs works ok, but the typical steel TA is 1600-1800 lbs or so. That leaves with the aluminum options or maybe a SA steel trailer.

I was initially planning on going aluminum for better corrosion resistance, but sticker shock has me looking at steel. Both my local Kubota and Deere dealers use aluminum trailers for pick-up/delivery, both might use Triton, I know the Kubota dealer does having just been there a couple weeks ago. I assume they are rugged enough to keep up with a dealer's use, should be ok for me. Maybe I'll get lucky and find a used aluminum trailer.
 

B737

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trailers in general have gotten crazy, aluminum even worse. Aluminum to me, was totally worth it when I was driving the half ton. I am sad to be parting with it next month because if I had to buy it new today, I couldn't afford it!
 
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jnschnit

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Here is my B2601 TLB on a 16ft PJ8316 dovetail trailer. I tow it with a 15 Jeep Grand Cherokee with the v6 and factory tow package. Trailer has brakes. Don't think I would like to tow cross country but no problems around town here in upstate NY (hills) and is easy to tow.
 

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OrangeKrush

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I would stick with tandem axles no matter which you go with but I think you'll be fine with the 16' steel trailer with the electric brakes.
 

TRUCK3

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I would stick with tandem axles no matter which you go with but I think you'll be fine with the 16' steel trailer with the electric brakes.
Thanks for the feedback - yes I'm leaning toward a 16 ft steel TA like the Big Tex 60PI 6k trailer. 6k rather than 7k drops the trailer weight 300 lbs or so and keeps it at about 1500 lbs. Would give me 3500 lbs capacity with the T4R and the full 4500 lbs if I ever upsize the tow vehicle. That is probably the best I'll do without spending the $$$ on aluminum.
 
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Dieseldonato

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Idk exactly how far you feel like driving for a trailer, but Appalachian trailer down here has some decent rated lightweight steel trailers. They are priced pretty farily. I know several people that own them that don't tow heavy or often that like them. I have a 16' 12k big tex and really like it. It's been fantastic as long as I've had it, and my uncle owned it before me and he liked it as well. Sold it when he decided to buy a big rollback and didn't use it much anymore.
A note on your Toyota tow rating. Make sure that it can handle the 5k lbs rating without a weight distribution hitch. My expedition is good for 8800lbs with out and 10k lbs with a weight distribution hitch, but the use of the weight distribution hitch is on a completely different page in the owners manual.
 
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PA452

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I would stick with tandem axles no matter which you go with but I think you'll be fine with the 16' steel trailer with the electric brakes.
+1

I have a 16' steel TA PJ trailer. I would like to upgrade to 18' or maybe 20' someday with some new features, but I really like that trailer a lot. Also wish I'd have gone with a beavertail trailer. I didn't think I wanted that when I was buying because I envisioned it dragging on the ground at times, but the alternative is I end up having to be particular about how and where I load because the angle on the gate is too sharp if I have a mower on or the backhoe. If I don't have a hill or light slope I can back up to, sometimes I'll block up the gate a bit and then add ramps down off the gate.

This is my B2650 on the 16' PJ.



 
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Dieseldonato

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+1

I have a 16' steel TA PJ trailer. I would like to upgrade to 18' or maybe 20' someday with some new features, but I really like that trailer a lot. Also wish I'd have gone with a beavertail trailer. I didn't think I wanted that when I was buying because I envisioned it dragging on the ground at times, but the alternative is I end up having to be particular about how and where I load because the angle on the gate is too sharp if I have a mower on or the backhoe. If I don't have a hill or light slope I can back up to, sometimes I'll block up the gate a bit and then add ramps down off the gate.

This is my B2650 on the 16' PJ.



Beaver tails get drug a lot depending on length and height, my deck over has a 5 foot tail that sits roughly 16" off the ground. Great for loading, not so much for rough terrain. Getting removable ramps will solve most of the issues. I do agree on the footage. 16 foot is a little short. Wish my big tex was 18.