Tire and Rim question......please.

Flintknapper

Well-known member

Equipment
L2350DT
May 3, 2022
341
406
63
Deep East Texas
I recently purchased an L2350DT. I believe the year of manufacture to be 1995 or 1996.

I am wanting to replace the rear tires....as the ones on it now are fairly worn.

I would prefer to have Tubeless tires on it (for sake of fixing punctures). The front tires are Tubeless....but the rears are a Tube Tire (Firestone Traction Field & Road F151).

My Question:

Do I have the option of using either a tube type OR tubeless tire (with respect to the rim)?

In other words.... is there anything about the rim that would cause me to have to use one type of tire or another?

I understand the difference in the beads of the two tires, but as concerns the rims...but does anyone know if I can use a Tubeless tire.

The construction of the rear rims looks similar to the fronts which have tubeless tires. But I don't know if there is a difference in the valve stem hole size in the rims or not?

I'm sure I should already know all of this....but I don't. So seeking advice from those more experienced. Thank You.

Front rim:

Tubeless1.jpg

Tubeless2.jpg



Rear rim:




IMG_8658.JPG

Tubeless4.jpg
 

woodman55

Active member

Equipment
L6060HSTC, RTV 1100
May 15, 2022
248
134
43
canada
Are the wheels loaded ? Sometimes tubes are installed to isolate the fluid from the rim. Also check the tires to see if reads if it can be mounted tubeless or not. You could also talk to a tire shop to see what they have to say.
 

Flintknapper

Well-known member

Equipment
L2350DT
May 3, 2022
341
406
63
Deep East Texas
Are the wheels loaded ? Sometimes tubes are installed to isolate the fluid from the rim. Also check the tires to see if reads if it can be mounted tubeless or not. You could also talk to a tire shop to see what they have to say.

Tires are not loaded. The tires from my research are designed to be a tube type. My question concerns whether or not I can use a Tubeless tire on the rims I have (if anyone knows).
 

rc51stierhoff

Well-known member

Equipment
B2650, MX6000
Sep 13, 2021
670
494
63
Ohio
I am not really sure on your particular rims (I’ve not looked at my own close enough to say if mine) But usually there is a stamping on one or both side of the rim that will tell you about the size and all that. A tire shop should put correct new valve/stem when they put new tires on. If they are dirty you may need to wipe off to read the markings…if you have lost paint it may be hard to read. Also you could try bending the stem…is it fixed and sealed as if to hold the air in or can you see down in the hole around the valve and actually see the tube? It it is tubeless the valve needs to be sealed to the rim. Those would be my thoughts to check. When I see the nut on the stem I tend to think that is on there to hold the tube from moving in and out…they need a should of some sort to keep them from pulling in. But honestly I can’t tell. The plastic nut there is what makes me question it. Good luck.
 

Dieseldonato

Well-known member

Equipment
B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
688
389
63
Pa
They make tube and tubeless tires for the same wheel. Idk if your tractor is the same wheels as my dad's L245dt. But he has one tubeless tire on the rear and a tube type on the other side. He got a piece of metal stuck in the side wall of one of the tube tires and the local tire shop wouldn't do anything but replace the tire. He doesn't run loaded tires, and they had the correct size tire on hand, so on the rim it went.
 

Flintknapper

Well-known member

Equipment
L2350DT
May 3, 2022
341
406
63
Deep East Texas
I am not really sure on your particular rims (I’ve not looked at my own close enough to say if mine) But usually there is a stamping on one or both side of the rim that will tell you about the size and all that. A tire shop should put correct new valve/stem when they put new tires on. If they are dirty you may need to wipe off to read the markings…if you have lost paint it may be hard to read. Also you could try bending the stem…is it fixed and sealed as if to hold the air in or can you see down in the hole around the valve and actually see the tube? It it is tubeless the valve needs to be sealed to the rim. Those would be my thoughts to check. When I see the nut on the stem I tend to think that is on there to hold the tube from moving in and out…they need a should of some sort to keep them from pulling in. But honestly I can’t tell. The plastic nut there is what makes me question it. Good luck.

I will look on the rims for any markings. As for the rear tires...I am not in doubt about those, they are clearly tube type and have tubes. The fronts are tubeless. My only question concerns the rear rims themselves.

Are they/will they accommodate a Tubeless tire? They appear to be the same construction as the front rims (which have tubeless tires) but I can't say for certain. That was the purpose for my question.

It is perfectly possible to put tube in a 'tubeless' tire to preserve it after a severe puncture. I don't know if that is what I am looking at here since I am not the original owner and don't know the history of the tractor.

I am wanting to purchase new tires (and might do so online) depending on price differences (local vs. online) but need to know IF I can run a tubeless tire (my preference).
 

Flintknapper

Well-known member

Equipment
L2350DT
May 3, 2022
341
406
63
Deep East Texas
They make tube and tubeless tires for the same wheel. Idk if your tractor is the same wheels as my dad's L245dt. But he has one tubeless tire on the rear and a tube type on the other side. He got a piece of metal stuck in the side wall of one of the tube tires and the local tire shop wouldn't do anything but replace the tire. He doesn't run loaded tires, and they had the correct size tire on hand, so on the rim it went.
Yeah, that's kind of what I am trying to determine IF the wheel/rim from that era (mid 90's) was universal in its ability to be used either way. The only difference being the 'bead' on the tire itself. Tubeless tires seal by virtue of the tire bead seating against the rim lip. Tube tires rely on the tube to contain the air.

Tube type tires can not be used as tubeless tire....but a tubeless tire can accept a tube and be used that way.
 

Flintknapper

Well-known member

Equipment
L2350DT
May 3, 2022
341
406
63
Deep East Texas
I am not really sure on your particular rims (I’ve not looked at my own close enough to say if mine) But usually there is a stamping on one or both side of the rim that will tell you about the size and all that.
^^^^^

I looked carefully at the rear wheels/rims and could not find any stampings to indicate size/rim type, etc...

The only stamping (numerals) looked to be a Part Number and it was partially covered the axle flange.

But nothing to indicate size (which I already know) or any other designation.
 

Dieseldonato

Well-known member

Equipment
B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
688
389
63
Pa
My dad's L245dt is a 77 or 78. I'm pretty confident it's just the tire itself and doesn't have much to do with the actual wheel.