Snowblower/PTO load on BX2380

Captaincj

New member
Apr 2, 2019
72
0
0
Hugo, MN
Question about how hard to load up the engine/PTO on my new BX2380.

I mowed several times with my 60"mmm, engine didn't seem to know the mower was even attached...

My new 55" commercial grade BX2822A snowblower is a different story. Blowing about 6" of heavyish snow yesterday in Minnesota and the BX2380 definitely knew the snowblower was attached. Obviously I can slow down and decrease the load.

My question is when running about 3,100 RPM, when I started to dig into the snow at a moderate clip the engine RPM would drop to about 2,800-2,900. If I went slower, the RPM would be higher of course.

The question is, from 3,100 RPM, what RPM drop would be considered safe/appropriate/optimal when loaded up? I can vary my speed to stay in that safe/optimal engine load?

If you all could give me your opinion based on:

1. A fully broken in engine.

2. My current engine that has about 12 hours on it.

And, I'll add, I absolutely LOVE the machine, the mower and the snowblower.

Thanks to all.

Christopher Johnson
 

conropl

Member

Equipment
L3560 HSDC
Oct 17, 2016
223
3
18
West Michigan
Your tractor HP is rated at 3200 rpm engine speed. In my experience with snowblowers, if you start dropping engine rpm's by 10%, then things start going downhill pretty quickly. That is, if you load it up and start dropping below 2900 rpm's, the impeller speed goes down and does not clear as well and just starts loading up more... which quickly starts bogging the motor down further.

This seems to be a point of contention with some here; but when snow blowing, I would run at full throttle. Running lower than that just slows the impeller to make it more difficult to clear the snow. That just serves to load it up quicker, (plus reduce the available HP and torque), causing the engine to load up quicker which also makes it harder to react to keep it from bogging down further.

A 55" blower seems a little large for 17.7 PTO HP. I had a 23 hp tractor with a 50" blower which worked well most of the time, but I think I would have had to slow down more with a 55" blower. In the end, you may be able to actually get done faster by slowing down and taking a bigger bite than I could (maybe even cut out one pass). But I know me, and would try to push it fast than I should causing it to load up more... but that's just me.

In the end, all you can do is run it and see what works for you based on the variables given to you (i.e., snow depth, snow wetness, and snow density - how packed it is). You are not going to hurt your tractor as long as you do not lug the engine all the time.

Good luck.

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RCW

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX2360, FEL, MMM, BX2750D snowblower. 1953 Minneapolis Moline ZAU
Apr 28, 2013
4,148
22
38
Chenango County, NY
My BX2360 has never worked harder than some sessions with the 'blower.

A snowblower eats a lot more HP than some other implements, according to some of our members here on OTT. You're taking 6" of wet/heavy snow 55" wide, it's A LOT of stuff thrown a long ways.....That's work, and work=HP.:D

Like conropl said, work it. You'll get it figured out pretty quick and will become second nature. A small decrease in RPM's is expected and not harmful, within reason.

To your questions, I wouldn't go lookin' for any 4-foot drift bustin' with just 12 hours. Work it, but don't overdo it. I think what you're doing now is spot on for break-in, and honestly, I might push it just a little harder..just a little, for now....:)
 
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orange crusher

New member

Equipment
BX 2680
Sep 30, 2017
70
0
0
ontario canada
I have the same blower. When I bought mine the dealer told me 2380 was good 2680 was better. Coming up on my 3 rd winter and my 2680 has no problem handling lots of snow up in Ontario. Was money well spent as far as i'm concerned.
 

eserv

Active member

Equipment
BX24, A1000 Kubota Generator
May 27, 2009
1,862
0
36
Hardisty, Alberta
I have the same blower. When I bought mine the dealer told me 2380 was good 2680 was better. Coming up on my 3 rd winter and my 2680 has no problem handling lots of snow up in Ontario. Was money well spent as far as i'm concerned.
Some implements will use all the power you can give them. A snowblower is one, woodchippers and hammermills are two more. I often make black smoke with my BX24d when blowing snow.
 

GreensvilleJay

Active member

Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
1,072
13
38
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
I keep the RPMs up but take less bite( width).
Go sloow first full width cut an dget RID of that snow, then take 1/2 or 1/3 or 2/3 'bites' and get RID of that snow, far,far away. You'll know real quick how much 'width' of snow you can get RID of.
If possible, it's better to remove 3" then another 3" , not all 6" at once, though I forget some people actually have to work, have families, etc.
I wait for 4" THEN remove...more than that,especially if heavy is a task(hard on) for any snowblower.
 

RCW

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX2360, FEL, MMM, BX2750D snowblower. 1953 Minneapolis Moline ZAU
Apr 28, 2013
4,148
22
38
Chenango County, NY
Like eserv said, I made some black smoke just a few minutes ago with the snowblower....we got up to 31 degrees F.

Stuff was heavy .....[emoji15]


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atitus

Member

Equipment
BX1880+FEL,MMM,Blower
Feb 11, 2019
79
0
6
Worcester, MA
I'm using BX1880 here, so I have even less to work with than the 2380. I frequently have to go slower than I want to (forward speed). I run the snowblower at PTO designated RPM, which is were its designed to be run. Even with light snow, you do hit a max clear rate where it just can't empty the snow any faster and it starts to push the snow in front of it. I do regret not getting a bigger engine on those really wet slush days but other than that, it works well and I am happy with it.

I have made my peace with the fact that its not a plow, and so I can't clear the snow super fast. For me a plow is difficult because there aren't a lot of places to push the snow. The blower may be slower, but it gets rid of the snow where I never have to deal with it again, which in the long run saves me time.
 

tiktock

New member
Jun 27, 2018
225
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0
Plaistow
I'm using BX1880 here, so I have even less to work with than the 2380. I frequently have to go slower than I want to (forward speed). I run the snowblower at PTO designated RPM, which is were its designed to be run. Even with light snow, you do hit a max clear rate where it just can't empty the snow any faster and it starts to push the snow in front of it. I do regret not getting a bigger engine on those really wet slush days but other than that, it works well and I am happy with it.

I have made my peace with the fact that its not a plow, and so I can't clear the snow super fast. For me a plow is difficult because there aren't a lot of places to push the snow. The blower may be slower, but it gets rid of the snow where I never have to deal with it again, which in the long run saves me time.
Same!

This last storm I did a full foot and had to slow at times with my 1880 or it simply couldnt move the snow fast enough. I usually dont do 12"+ in one pass. I still eat through the 4' high snowbanks the plows leaves with ease! I run PTO or higher if I'm bogging at all in really wet stuff. After walking behind 200# beasts for 30 years I dont think I could complain even if I wanted to!
 

rjcorazza

Member

Equipment
L4060 HSTC Loader, ZD326, ZD331
Mar 9, 2016
751
0
16
Hyattstown, MD
I think you have a good idea of the sweet spot while blowing snow. Other posters have mentioned the quick downward spiral of lowering RPM > Increased snow load in the blower, leading to a quick stall if speed or snow ingestion is not reduced.
Slow and steady wins the race in snow blowing. I don't excessively bog my tractor down on a routine basis, and I certainly don't stall if out.

My current tractor has some cool transmission features that I want to test out in deep snow... "Stall Guard" that slows the traveling speed down under heavy load. I've tried it out mowing a few times (thick grass, uphill) and it works well, but honestly my seat-of-pants control seems to work just as well if I pay attention to what I'm doing.


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Captaincj

New member
Apr 2, 2019
72
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Hugo, MN
So, if I modulate my speed to keep RPMs within about 2-300 from unloaded, I'm good?

Does it matter if I use high or low range on the HST?

Christopher Johnson
 

GaryL

Member

Equipment
2003 BX2200 - loader, mower, blower, grss collection system
Nov 22, 2014
119
0
16
Holden, MA
So, if I modulate my speed to keep RPMs within about 2-300 from unloaded, I'm good?

Does it matter if I use high or low range on the HST?

Christopher Johnson
Hey Christopher.
I have a BX2200. I run the thing at full throttle blowing snow. I've never hurt her doing that. New England winters are pretty tough, usually being thick heavy snow. If I drop it at all, I will start to see black smoke, which in turn will actually be worse for the motor than just running it WOT. As far as for which gear, well, if I am blowing a few inches, (sounds weird saying that) I can run High and go back quickly on a driveway, and forward mid pedal to blow. Anymore than a few inches, and I always run Low gear. It changes the pressure of the fluid going through the system, which will take less hydraulic power for the transmission, in turn giving you more usable h.p. at the front pto and blower. -Gary
 

Captaincj

New member
Apr 2, 2019
72
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0
Hugo, MN
Hey Christopher.
I have a BX2200. I run the thing at full throttle blowing snow. I've never hurt her doing that. New England winters are pretty tough, usually being thick heavy snow. If I drop it at all, I will start to see black smoke, which in turn will actually be worse for the motor than just running it WOT. As far as for which gear, well, if I am blowing a few inches, (sounds weird saying that) I can run High and go back quickly on a driveway, and forward mid pedal to blow. Anymore than a few inches, and I always run Low gear. It changes the pressure of the fluid going through the system, which will take less hydraulic power for the transmission, in turn giving you more usable h.p. at the front pto and blower. -Gary
Thanks Gary, I don't mean to suggest running the engine at less than full throttle.

I guess my question is if I'm at full throttle, and then when I start to blow snow if I modulate my speed to keep the RPMs from dropping more than 2-300, would that be about perfect or optimal?

If full throttle is 3,200, should I make sure RPMs don't drop below 3,000 as I load up the blower? Is that about right?

Thanks

Christopher Johnson
 

RCW

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX2360, FEL, MMM, BX2750D snowblower. 1953 Minneapolis Moline ZAU
Apr 28, 2013
4,148
22
38
Chenango County, NY
CJ -- I ALWAYS run low range while blowing. Too many opportunities for bad things to happen in high, whether speed/bogging down, chute rotation, hitting something...the list goes on....

Certainly the pedal/speed is the way to keep things operating optimally.

I gave up looking at the tachometer a long time ago. Again, just becomes second nature quite quickly. Very soon you won't give it much thought either.
 

atitus

Member

Equipment
BX1880+FEL,MMM,Blower
Feb 11, 2019
79
0
6
Worcester, MA
Thanks Gary, I don't mean to suggest running the engine at less than full throttle.

I guess my question is if I'm at full throttle, and then when I start to blow snow if I modulate my speed to keep the RPMs from dropping more than 2-300, would that be about perfect or optimal?

If full throttle is 3,200, should I make sure RPMs don't drop below 3,000 as I load up the blower? Is that about right?

Thanks

Christopher Johnson
I don't think running it at full (maximum) throttle is necessary. The goal should be to run the blower at PTO speed. On BX2380 there should be an rpm range in yellow on the dash. If the snow is very heavy and wet, perhaps you increase the throttle a little more so that when you engage the snow the needle stays in the yellow PTO indicated range. If you get better results running with higher throttle, then go for it. I'm just giving you my experience which is that its not necessary to get good results, and I have a smaller engine than you.

I would not expect that you would blow snow in high range HST. I can't say for sure that you would hurt anything however what would be the point of that? If you are going a fast enough speed to warrant high range than its not going to be doing a very good job blowing snow.

As you push into snow you'll hear the engine start to load and the RPM will start to drop. When the needle dips below the yellow PTO indicated range, just slow down a bit and let the snow clear. This is what I do and it works for me. I don't get clogs, and I don't have problems clearing wet snow.
 

atitus

Member

Equipment
BX1880+FEL,MMM,Blower
Feb 11, 2019
79
0
6
Worcester, MA
I gave up looking at the tachometer a long time ago. Again, just becomes second nature quite quickly. Very soon you won't give it much thought either.
Same here. I started by watching the needle in the yellow range like I stated in my post but it doesn't take to long before you can tell by the sound of the engine it becomes obvious very quickly.
 

RCW

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX2360, FEL, MMM, BX2750D snowblower. 1953 Minneapolis Moline ZAU
Apr 28, 2013
4,148
22
38
Chenango County, NY
This is what I do and it works for me. I don't get clogs, and I don't have problems clearing wet snow.
True -

I don't think my BX2750D blower has ever clogged/plugged in 6 or 7 seasons (unless I broke a shear pin :eek:).

We've had some big snows in that time; 34" once, 12"+ many times.
 

GaryL

Member

Equipment
2003 BX2200 - loader, mower, blower, grss collection system
Nov 22, 2014
119
0
16
Holden, MA
I don't even have a tach on the BX2200. You can just tell from the sound, and yes, when it starts to bog down, just slow down. If you see black smoke, definitely slow down.

I use high when I am doing a straight driveway and I don't want to keep shifting from low to high when backing up. This is only with a small amount of snow, and I just go slowly with the pedal, then reverse quickly for the next strip. You bog down way to easily in high range blowing deeper snow. Sort of like mowing, just a neaten up mid summer, I can do it on high for time. Spring, low because of the volume of grass.

I never run my machine at less than WOT for mowing or blowing.
 

tiktock

New member
Jun 27, 2018
225
0
0
Plaistow
The only clogging i've ever had was before I took off what I assume is some kind of safety screen they install inside the chute. It was a slush magnet and made clearing the chute a total pain. Once I pulled it out things have been smooth sailing but I do have issues throwing the snow TOO far and not sure if thats related.
 

Captaincj

New member
Apr 2, 2019
72
0
0
Hugo, MN
Wow, didn't realize the high vs low range would be such a hot topic.

I have a good basic understanding of machinery, but not really tractor specific.

If I blow snow at full throttle, and travel at exactly 1.00 mph (this is a hypothetical question) blowing snow, what difference does it make if I'm in high or low range?

In high I'd have the pedal just cracked open, in low maybe 1/4 pedal. Either way, 1.00 mph forward speed, what's the difference for the PTO?

Thanks guys, I want to learn.

Christopher Johnson