New to tractor tires...need help with replacement/repair of 12.4-24 tubed/filled tire

Swamp_Yankee

New member

Equipment
L295DT
Oct 4, 2021
11
0
1
Hunterdon County, NJ
I recently bought a well used 1979 Kubota L295DT. The rear tires (12.4-24 ag tread) are pretty rough (cracked sidewalls, chunks missing, etc...) and have tubes that are filled with brine according to the previous owner. The left rear has not only developed a leak, but the valve stem got pulled into the tire as I guess the tube and/or the tire itself shifted. What are my options for repair or replacement here? I know that I can't just pull them off myself since the tire weighs hundreds of pounds filled with brine. I'd hate to see what a mobile repair guy with a crane charges :eek: In any event, once I get them off should I just re-tube them and leave the old tires be? Should I replace them with tubeless tires, etc...? If I do replace them with tubeless tires that might a challenge as the hole for the valve stem looks kind of hogged out either due to corrosion or because it was deliberately done. I'm not sure that a new valve stem could be put in and sealed properly?
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,051
418
83
North East
If the rims are in good enough condition, you can have the original valve stem hole welded shut, and a new hole drilled into the rim. I don't see any good way to save the liquid weight inside of the tire. I suggest that you collect a sample, and try to determine what it is. Possibly a local tire shop or tractor dealer can help you with this. If it turns out that it isn't hazardous to the environment, then it is as easy as drilling a hole in the tire to let it out. If it is a hazardous liquid, then all you can do it to contact your local hazardous waste site and ask for advice.
I would purchase new tires and have them mounted, loaded, and installed where you bought the tires. It will mean that you will need to bring the tractor to the dealer (tire or tractor) for mounting to your tractor. Some tire dealers also have a mobile service that is reasonably priced.
 

Swamp_Yankee

New member

Equipment
L295DT
Oct 4, 2021
11
0
1
Hunterdon County, NJ
If the rims are in good enough condition, you can have the original valve stem hole welded shut, and a new hole drilled into the rim. I don't see any good way to save the liquid weight inside of the tire. I suggest that you collect a sample, and try to determine what it is. Possibly a local tire shop or tractor dealer can help you with this. If it turns out that it isn't hazardous to the environment, then it is as easy as drilling a hole in the tire to let it out. If it is a hazardous liquid, then all you can do it to contact your local hazardous waste site and ask for advice.
I would purchase new tires and have them mounted, loaded, and installed where you bought the tires. It will mean that you will need to bring the tractor to the dealer (tire or tractor) for mounting to your tractor. Some tire dealers also have a mobile service that is reasonably priced.
Thanks for the input. Would you recommend going tubeless if I can? Miller Tire sells tube tires in this size that are pretty similar to what is on there but two tires, two tubes, and shipping is about $1000.
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,051
418
83
North East
Check locally to see what it will cost to have "your" tires mounted, versus buying the tires from a local dealer and having them mounted. I know that tires purchased elsewhere, cost a lot more to get mounted than tires bought from a tire dealer. In the end, the savings of buying and shipping, and having it locally mounted aren't worth the cost difference. If you have a problem with the tires in the future, the dealer is more inclined to help you if you bought the tires from him. It is like you bringing your own eggs to the diner to have them cook and serve them to you.
The tire dealer is in a better place to determine if you should go tubeless or tubed. If you go tubeless, then have metal valve stems installed. If your tires don't have a guard around the valve stem, then have the guard welded on before you buy tires. It will protect the valve stem from damage. The guard is nothing more than a short piece of pipe that is welded onto the rim. The tire dealer will show you what it is. Also check with your local tractor dealer for assistance. Buying local is usually better unless you can do the work yourself.
 

Henro

Well-known member

Equipment
B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
2,393
795
113
North of Pittsburgh PA
I recently bought a well used 1979 Kubota L295DT. The rear tires (12.4-24 ag tread) are pretty rough (cracked sidewalls, chunks missing, etc...) and have tubes that are filled with brine according to the previous owner. The left rear has not only developed a leak, but the valve stem got pulled into the tire as I guess the tube and/or the tire itself shifted. What are my options for repair or replacement here? I know that I can't just pull them off myself since the tire weighs hundreds of pounds filled with brine. I'd hate to see what a mobile repair guy with a crane charges :eek: In any event, once I get them off should I just re-tube them and leave the old tires be? Should I replace them with tubeless tires, etc...? If I do replace them with tubeless tires that might a challenge as the hole for the valve stem looks kind of hogged out either due to corrosion or because it was deliberately done. I'm not sure that a new valve stem could be put in and sealed properly?
Is this a 4wd tractor or 2wd? If 2wd whatever you put on the back will not matter much. If 4wd, you need to match the front/rear tire sizes acording to the original ratios.