New to me B7610

Boss Hog

New member

Equipment
B7610 + other MF tractors.
Apr 20, 2022
12
1
3
Illinois
Sort of a bittersweet story - A friend died and left a B7610 to my Wife. We got it about a week ago.


It's been cold and wet since we got it, so not much chance to mess with it. I've been doing routine maintenance, changing filters, new battery, etc.

I have farmed all my life. Always drove Massey Ferguson tractors. (I'm allergic to green paint) Zero experience with Kubota. So I'll probably have some questions.

First one is - Even at 50° I have to use the glow plugs to get it to start. Is that normal for these engines?


Edited to add - The sales slip shows the friend bought the tractor new in 2004. The engine has 960 hours.

Edited again to show the correct model#.
 
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GreensvilleJay

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Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
4,661
1,477
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Greensville,Ontario,Canada
My BX23S was new in 2019, I've always used 2-3 seconds of glowplug heat to start it, Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall. If I don't ,you can tell it takes longer, harder to start. Nature of diesels, I suppose.
 

85Hokie

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BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90&'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
9,093
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Bedford - VA
Boss,

Welcome to the forum - that number B7216 is an unknown number ......... is that a loader number by chance?

Look around for a name plate - maybe on the clutch side of the frame and see if you can dig up another number.

And as Jay say - older Kubotas needed a little more warmth, even in summer!!!

I have 2 B7100 that need at least 5-6 seconds in the summer time!!
 

TheOldHokie

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L3901/LA525, B7200DT/B1630, G2160/RCK60, G2460/RCK60
Apr 6, 2021
2,278
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Myersville, MD
Sort of a bittersweet story - A friend died and left a B7216 to my Wife. We got it about a week ago.


It's been cold and wet since we got it, so not much chance to mess with it. I've been doing routine maintenance, changing filters, new battery, etc.

I have farmed all my life. Always drove Massey Ferguson tractors. (I'm allergic to green paint) Zero experience with Kubota. So I'll probably have some questions.

First one is - Even at 50° I have to use the glow plugs to get it to start. Is that normal for these engines?


Edited to add - The sales slip shows the friend bought the tractor new in 2004. The engine has 960 hours.
Without using the glow plugs AND decompress my 1980ish B7200 would be very reluctant to start at 50F and the battery better be in good shape.. With just a few seconds of glow plug preheat it would fire up immediately.. In colder temperatures using decompress is a must. Once warmed up it starts just like any gas engine. Newer models need less cold start assistance but the glow plugs are still there for a reason. My 2021 L3901 will start at 50F without preheat but it cranks for a bit. Preheat for just a couple seconds and it starts immediately.

Dan
 

Edke6bnl

Member

Equipment
B7800 Kubota, case 1840 Skidsteer Ford 3500
Mar 31, 2022
37
7
8
Agua Dulce, California
Without using the glow plugs AND decompress my 1980ish B7200 would be very reluctant to start at 50F and the battery better be in good shape.. With just a few seconds of glow plug preheat it would fire up immediately.. In colder temperatures using decompress is a must. Once warmed up it starts just like any gas engine. Newer models need less cold start assistance but the glow plugs are still there for a reason. My 2021 L3901 will start at 50F without preheat but it cranks for a bit. Preheat for just a couple seconds and it starts immediately.

Dan
That is good to know, I just got a b7800 and it is a little sluggish at 50* but I have not been using the glow plugs. I will start using it first start for now on. thanks
 

Boss Hog

New member

Equipment
B7610 + other MF tractors.
Apr 20, 2022
12
1
3
Illinois
Boss,

Welcome to the forum - that number B7216 is an unknown number ......... is that a loader number by chance?
Blame old age and a lot of numbers floating around in my head.

It's a B7610. I fixed the thread title.


Sounds like using the glow plugs is normal. I wonder why these engines are different from other diesel engines?
 

PoTreeBoy

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L35 Ford 3930
Mar 24, 2020
1,067
417
83
WestTn/NoMs
Blame old age and a lot of numbers floating around in my head.

It's a B7610. I fixed the thread title.


Sounds like using the glow plugs is normal. I wonder why these engines are different from other diesel engines?
It may be because they're indirect injection. As noted above, as engines lose compression preheat helps, but that tractor's just broke in good, as they say.
My L35 will start without glow at 50, but starts instantly with it.
My BIL's little Ford 1520 just about refuses without preheat, even in the summer.
My Dad's Ford 3930 starts instantly, hot or cold. It has thermostart instead of glow plugs, but I don't know when it activates.
 

Boss Hog

New member

Equipment
B7610 + other MF tractors.
Apr 20, 2022
12
1
3
Illinois
It may be because they're indirect injection.
I'm not familiar with "indirect injection". That certainly may have something to do with it.

I've been driving diesels for close to half a century, and have never seen a tractor with glow plugs until this one.


Next question -

Attached is a pic of the loader control. What' the lever with the black handle in the upper right of the picture?
 

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85Hokie

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BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90&'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
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Bedford - VA
If I am not mistaken - that is a "lockout" -- throw it into the other position and the joystick will be locked out
 
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PoTreeBoy

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L35 Ford 3930
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I'm not familiar with "indirect injection". That certainly may have something to do with it.

I've been driving diesels for close to half a century, and have never seen a tractor with glow plugs until this one.


Next question -

Attached is a pic of the loader control. What' the lever with the black handle in the upper right of the picture?
Indirect means there's a pre-combustion chamber. I think it gives more efficient combustion, and there doesn't seem to be as much clatter. The conventional combustion chamber is tiny. Don't even get a can of starter fluid close to that Kubota!
 
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TheOldHokie

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L3901/LA525, B7200DT/B1630, G2160/RCK60, G2460/RCK60
Apr 6, 2021
2,278
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Myersville, MD
Blame old age and a lot of numbers floating around in my head.

It's a B7610. I fixed the thread title.


Sounds like using the glow plugs is normal. I wonder why these engines are different from other diesel engines?
I'm not familiar with "indirect injection". That certainly may have something to do with it.

I've been driving diesels for close to half a century, and have never seen a tractor with glow plugs until this one.


Next question -

Attached is a pic of the loader control. What' the lever with the black handle in the upper right of the picture?
And exactly what tractors have you been operating? Diesel tractors with glow plugs are so common as to be "standard". To name a few JD, Case, IH, Ford, New Holland, Kubota, MF, Kyoti, Mahindra, Fiat, Hesston, Agco, Mitsubishi Shibaura all have machuines that use glow plugs. Bobcat equipment uses glow plugs. . Ford used them in their pickups. Dodge Cummins engines used intake air heaters instead but the idea is similar. Without some sort of pre-heat diesels just don't start well when cold.

You might want to consult the owner's manual for your new tractor. It answers these and other questions.

Dan
 

Boss Hog

New member

Equipment
B7610 + other MF tractors.
Apr 20, 2022
12
1
3
Illinois

I've been driving MF tractors (and other brands) since the late 1960s. Like I said - Never drove one with glow plugs.
 

OrangeKrush

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BX2680, LA344 with Piranha tooth bar, LP PF 1242, LP Rear Blade, KK 60" BB
Nov 15, 2020
876
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Indy
3-5 seconds should be plenty in that temp. Once started and ran you should not need it again unless it sits half a day.
 
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Henro

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B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
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I've been driving MF tractors (and other brands) since the late 1960s. Like I said - Never drove one with glow plugs.
Just a related thought, but some diesel engines used either as a starting assist if needed. Perhaps those were engines that did not have glow plugs.

NEVER use either or any other gas when trying to start a Kubota engine...it is reported that severe damage can/will result.

Mentioning this just in case the diesel engines you have experience with might be one of those where either (or whatever the stuff in the spray can is called) could be used.
 

MINICUP28

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B7610, KX-018, RTV-500, JD X758
Feb 21, 2019
64
28
18
COBLESKILL, NY
I have had my B7610 since about the same time frame. Would be glad to help you out with any service or operating questions. The parts & operator manuals are available online or I can send them to you by private message.
 
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Dieseldonato

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B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
544
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Pa
I would hazard a guess most of them were either automatic glow plug or direct injection. The more modern electronically controlled diesels may have glow plugs, but they are pretty much automatic. Bigger engines typically employ intake heaters or don't have a pre heat function. Kubota as a rule seems to like a bit of preheat at most any temperature and it becomes pretty much a necessity at lower temps. My dad has had several kubta powered pieces of equipment over the years as well as working on them in industrial applications. They all loved a bit of glow plug to start quickly. Especially the older ones. His l245dt needs flow plugs everytime you start it. Doesn't matter if it's been running all day or if it's sat for 3 days in 30* weather. My 7510 just needs them for a few seconds, and doesn't need them if it has any temp in it.
As has been said throw the can of starting fluid in the trash. I got to rebuild many a small diesel engine because of its use. Kubota and yanmar were notorious for breaking a ring or cracking a piston if either was used.
 
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Boss Hog

New member

Equipment
B7610 + other MF tractors.
Apr 20, 2022
12
1
3
Illinois
I have had my B7610 since about the same time frame. Would be glad to help you out with any service or operating questions. The parts & operator manuals are available online or I can send them to you by private message.
I appreciate your offer. I don't have a parts manual, so that would be helpful.


To the rest of you - I'm done talking about glow plugs. Don't care if you believe me or not.
 

Mark_BX25D

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Bx25D
Jul 19, 2020
582
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Virginia
It may be because they're indirect injection.
I believe that's correct. The pre-chamber seems to need that heat. Maybe the heat of the compression stroke doesn't warm it up as quickly as the rest of the cylinder.


Don't even get a can of starter fluid close to that Kubota!
NEVER use either or any other gas when trying to start a Kubota engine...it is reported that severe damage can/will result.
CAN, not WILL. Please don't overstate the case. The fact is, plenty of people have done so without any ill effects. So, when you warn someone with such absolute terms, and they find out that yes, it can be done with no problem, they completely discount the warning.

But the percentages aren't good, and the damages can range from minor to catastrophic, meaning, bent rods and broken pistons.
It's not worth the risk.
 

Henro

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B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
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North of Pittsburgh PA

CAN, not WILL. Please don't overstate the case.
The fact is, plenty of people have done so without any ill effects. So, when you warn someone with such absolute terms, and they find out that yes, it can be done with no problem, they completely discount the warning.

But the percentages aren't good, and the damages can range from minor to catastrophic, meaning, bent rods and broken pistons.
It's not worth the risk.
LOL. I said Can/will. Guess your definition of over stating and mine are different. Can/will does not sound like an absolute warning to me.

Then you go on to state that the "will" probabilities exceed the "can" probabilities. And it is not worth the risk.

I find this humorous...