Loader specs needed to lift a 1200 lbs pallet of dried chicken manure?

farmermaker

New member
May 12, 2021
14
2
3
Canada
This is my first post! We're in the market for a used Kubota L or M series for our vegetable farm. Goodbye walk behind tractor! There are so many models of tractors and loaders it is getting overwhelming.

Can you help me figure out what type of loader is required to lift a 1200 lbs pallet (big bag) of fertilizer? Ideally, we'd store it on an industrial shelf in our large garage at 8ft or but if that requires a much bigger loader/tractor then we would settle with stacking two pallets high so about a 4ft lift height.

Does the size HP of the tractor influence the type of loader it can run? Is there a list of tractor/loader combos I can see somewhere?

Thanks!
 

85Hokie

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90&'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
9,046
1,089
113
Bedford - VA
The horsepower is really not your enemy here - but obviously helps as you move into the larger tractors.

The problem you will run into is this,

a bucket lift capacity is rated in different terms at different point along the travel - some are measured at the connection pins of the bucket ..... which are somewhat useless - other more common methods are rated at a point OUT from the pins - something like 24 inches. And then again there are different ratings for "picking of ground" and then "full height at pins" You can pick up something heavy off the ground - BUT NOT lift it very high .... much like the human body.

SO what you really need to look at is HOW much will tractor "X" pick UP and lift to the height that you wish.

WITH some pallet forks - the weight is pushed out a bit too - thus lowering the amount you can lift and to the max height you can lift it.

Short of going through the all the tractors literatures or pamphlets on each specific tractor - find a list of 5 tractors you are interested in and then go to this site and dig up the specs. Site is pretty spot on about the facts.

http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/tractor-brands/kubota/kubota-tractors.html
 

kubotafreak

Active member

Equipment
GRAND l6060, L3560, B6100, gr2100, tg 1860, g1800, g1900, g2160
Sep 20, 2018
747
222
43
Arkansas, US
MX6000 with la 1065 or grand l with la1055 Should fit the bill well. The loader number is in kg, so you pretty much double that number for lbs. You need something that can lift 2000lbs if your going to do it regularly. Like Hokie said, the forks get subtracted off the capacity, and the fact it is out from the frame any distance reduces capacity. Both of these machines are the largest compact. You might even consider the m utility size machine, as they are about equal price.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

farmermaker

New member
May 12, 2021
14
2
3
Canada
The horsepower is really not your enemy here - but obviously helps as you move into the larger tractors.

The problem you will run into is this,

a bucket lift capacity is rated in different terms at different point along the travel - some are measured at the connection pins of the bucket ..... which are somewhat useless - other more common methods are rated at a point OUT from the pins - something like 24 inches. And then again there are different ratings for "picking of ground" and then "full height at pins" You can pick up something heavy off the ground - BUT NOT lift it very high .... much like the human body.

SO what you really need to look at is HOW much will tractor "X" pick UP and lift to the height that you wish.

WITH some pallet forks - the weight is pushed out a bit too - thus lowering the amount you can lift and to the max height you can lift it.

Short of going through the all the tractors literatures or pamphlets on each specific tractor - find a list of 5 tractors you are interested in and then go to this site and dig up the specs. Site is pretty spot on about the facts.

http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/tractor-brands/kubota/kubota-tractors.html
I didn't realize tractor data has specs for the attachments. That's very useful! Thanks of elaborating on some important considerations.
 

greg86z28

Active member

Equipment
B2601
May 17, 2020
306
168
43
South Central Wisconsin
Sometimes the need for large loader capacity pushes you into a tractor class that is less ideal for all other tasks. The L3301, L3901 are really nice sized machines for small operations. They are also priced right.

Here is a spec diagram for the LA525 (L3301/3901) directly from the manual. Note that this uses the metric system. My guess is the line to the right is for a load at the lift pin and the line to the left is 500 mm forward (20"). Your pallet forks add weight too, say 300-350lbs. You could probably get the pallets 24" off the ground with this scenario.


1620832805774.png


If that won't cut it for your situation, you'll need to go with a tractor that comes equipped with a larger loader. I do always advice to buy the tractor that does most of what you need really well. If you only need to lift these pallets 2-3 times per year, perhaps you try to get more creative to allow you to buy the right sized tractor for the rest of your tasks.

Just some thoughts!
 

farmermaker

New member
May 12, 2021
14
2
3
Canada
Based on the great advice here and my own research, I think we're better off with a small tractor and rid ourselves of the expectation to store heavy pallets high off the ground. I would prefer a small tractor (and price!). As long as we can move the pallets around, it works for us. I'll look into the models you listed, Greg. Thanks!
 

greg86z28

Active member

Equipment
B2601
May 17, 2020
306
168
43
South Central Wisconsin
Based on the great advice here and my own research, I think we're better off with a small tractor and rid ourselves of the expectation to store heavy pallets high off the ground. I would prefer a small tractor (and price!). As long as we can move the pallets around, it works for us. I'll look into the models you listed, Greg. Thanks!
I also don't know how close your local dealer is, but you might be able to get a demo machine delivered to your property. You could try "driving it around" and seeing what you think of the physical size and capabilities are.

This might be tough with the current inventory issues, but back when I was shopping the dealer offered to do this on my B2601 (which I declined as I was 99% sure it was the right size unit for my situation).

The other thing is if you plan to move your tractor off your property. Bigger tractors might require different hauling equipment (trucks, trailers, etc).

Greg
 

dirtydeed

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650 BH77, BX23TLBM, box blade, rear blade, flail mower, Stump Grinder
Dec 8, 2017
2,064
1,226
113
Wind Gap, PA
Based on the great advice here and my own research, I think we're better off with a small tractor and rid ourselves of the expectation to store heavy pallets high off the ground. I would prefer a small tractor (and price!). As long as we can move the pallets around, it works for us. I'll look into the models you listed, Greg. Thanks!
If that's all you need to do, you should be able to get a smaller tractor (L series) that will handle that weight on the 3pt hitch. Just take a look at those specs for the tractor you are interested in. You'd need something like a carry all frame for the 3pt hitch. Most of the 3 pt hitch capacities are listed as 24" behind the lift point.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

kubotafreak

Active member

Equipment
GRAND l6060, L3560, B6100, gr2100, tg 1860, g1800, g1900, g2160
Sep 20, 2018
747
222
43
Arkansas, US
Keep in mind any l series can move them with the three point.

Looks like dirtydeed beat me to it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

PaulL

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
1,248
452
83
NZ
Also about to say look at 3ph. If you really want a way to stack things you can consider a few options:
- 3ph and a loading ramp - so the 3ph can now stack pallets for you
- cheap forklift. You don't need much of a forklift to lift that much
- I think I've seen 3ph forklift attachments?
- an electric winch/crane. I got one to lift my canoe in the shed, and I could get it with an I-beam crawler for not much money - 3ph to put the pallet near, then use the winch to lift, crawl along the row and drop on the stack

Unless you have another task that needs a big machine, I wouldn't get a large machine just for that one task - find another way. Even if it means buying your fertiliser in bags instead of one big bag.

On tractor size and your bed - I presume you mean trailer bed? Or do you mean crop rows? If the former, look out for weight and weight of implements. If the latter, many of these tractors with ag tyres you can flip them to get different wheel track widths.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

BigG

Well-known member

Equipment
l2501, FEL, BB, Rotary cutter, rake,spreader, roller, etc. New Holland TL80 A
Sep 14, 2018
1,829
641
113
West Central,FL
Buy a skid steer quick attach mount for the 3 point hitch. Then buy a ssqa pallet forks. Use the 3 point mount with the pallet forks to move the 1200 pallets. Then you could use the same pallet forks to lift lighter items and store them above the heavy pallets on the front end loader.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

mikester

Well-known member

Equipment
M59 TLB
Oct 21, 2017
1,571
576
113
Canada
www.divergentstuff.ca
Do yourself a favour and buy an outdoor forklift with minimum 3000# lift and side shift. I went with a 5000# indoor lift with SS so I can use 16' pallet racks. Tractors require a lot of turning space for loading pallet racks. If these racks are indoors you will have a lot of wasted space using a tractor.

You are going to need a minimum 3000+ lbs lift to handle 1200# pallets to full loader height safely. A lot of tractors are rated max capacity only 48 inches off the ground not to max loader height, keep that in mind.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user