Load Center

FOXHAVEN

New member
Might sound a bit excessive to some of you but here goes. I have an L2501 4x4 with the 525 loader and QA bucket option.
I tow this tractor around using a couple different trailers and am wondering does anyone know where the load center is on this tractor. I've figured out where the load center is on my HUDSON BROS. trailer to get the best load balance on it but have not found the sweet spot for where the Kubota should be lashed down. Any thoughts out there would be appreciated.
Thanks
 

GreensvilleJay

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
2,966
712
113
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
old skool says you need 10-15% of the weight on the tongue,so if you know the lengths of the trailers and the 'sweet spot' of one, you can figure it out. this works if BOTH are tandem axles.
 

85Hokie

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90-'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
8,559
769
113
Bedford - VA
Might sound a bit excessive to some of you but here goes. I have an L2501 4x4 with the 525 loader and QA bucket option.
I tow this tractor around using a couple different trailers and am wondering does anyone know where the load center is on this tractor. I've figured out where the load center is on my HUDSON BROS. trailer to get the best load balance on it but have not found the sweet spot for where the Kubota should be lashed down. Any thoughts out there would be appreciated.
Thanks
Fox,

Welcome to the forum -

I would first place the center of the tractor or what you might think is the balance point of the tractor with any attachments installed - and place that point over the front axle of the dual axles. Then move a bit forward and a bit backwards until you find that spot. I know from pulling my BX25D around - 6" of difference can be noticeable from the driver's seat. As mentioned - tongue weight is crucial to get that sweet spot.
 

FOXHAVEN

New member
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I'll start working up the numbers experimenting with position and see what I come up with. I'll let you know what I did and how my next tow goes.
Right now I'm just happy I got the lighting and brakes to work correctly for all three trailers on my truck trailers. I figured out there are multiple standards for trailer wire color code and in the end it doesn't really matter what color the wire is it's what each one does when you are wiring them up.
 

NCL4701

Well-known member

Equipment
L4701, WC68 chipper, grapple, BB1572 box scrape, Howes 500, 16kW IMD gen
Apr 27, 2020
872
805
93
Central Piedmont, NC
When I worked a job a long time ago hauling a tractor/bush hog combo to various places to bush hog my employer’s various lots, we had a block screwed to the trailer deck to locate the spot to park it on the trailer. That worked well as the tractor/implement combo never changed.

Problem I have now is I sometimes have nothing, bush hog, box scrape, or chipper on the back. Sometimes have grapple, bucket, bucket in grapple, forks, or no loader at all on the front. The longitudinal center of gravity for the tractor changes depending on what’s on the front and back so the “set in the same place every time” method doesn’t work.

I suppose you could measure the weight of the load and tongue weight every time. However, that isn’t always practical. So what I do is measure hitch height pre-loading. Make sure it drops 1.5” minimum; 2.5” maximum. Move tractor forward/backward to get it in that range with “ideal” being a 2” drop. That works well on my truck/trailer combo. YMMV.
 

ayak

Active member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
L3301 HST
Feb 16, 2018
260
182
43
WV
Can measure the before and after of the wheel well heights above the tires to check for squat, and can also get a hitch with a tongue-weight scale built-in—somewhat pricey but worth it if you have a lot of combinations and trailering to do.
This was on a trailer and l3301 with a box blade and FEL, totaling 8000#
87DA0CB0-7241-4812-B6A0-B1E6026F3C33.jpeg

26A76E0B-6383-464B-891D-F2F7C8D303CA.jpeg
 
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FOXHAVEN

New member
When I worked a job a long time ago hauling a tractor/bush hog combo to various places to bush hog my employer’s various lots, we had a block screwed to the trailer deck to locate the spot to park it on the trailer. That worked well as the tractor/implement combo never changed.

Problem I have now is I sometimes have nothing, bush hog, box scrape, or chipper on the back. Sometimes have grapple, bucket, bucket in grapple, forks, or no loader at all on the front. The longitudinal center of gravity for the tractor changes depending on what’s on the front and back so the “set in the same place every time” method doesn’t work.

I suppose you could measure the weight of the load and tongue weight every time. However, that isn’t always practical. So what I do is measure hitch height pre-loading. Make sure it drops 1.5” minimum; 2.5” maximum. Move tractor forward/backward to get it in that range with “ideal” being a 2” drop. That works well on my truck/trailer combo. YMMV.
Thanks for the reply. I'm in the same situation with varying implements and loader attachments.
I ran into a hitch on trying to determine the best spot on the trailer to load to when I tried to secure my ramps with the finish mower hooked up. The ramps come in contact with the mower right on the grease fittings for the casters so no choice but to move it forward and run a little hitch heavy. Guess I'll be welding pins on for rigid bars to the ramps to secure them straight up and toss the old chains, then it'll be back to working out my load positions. I figure I can dangle a small marker chain from each tractor and reference line the trailer. I probably sound too uptight about proper trailer loading but I have seen way too many trailer wrecks and all were because improper balance and trailer braking problems. I also know that I am running total towed loads at close to 100% rated on occasion.
 

FOXHAVEN

New member
Can measure the before and after of the wheel well heights above the tires to check for squat, and can also get a hitch with a tongue-weight scale built-in—somewhat pricey but worth it if you have a lot of combinations and trailering to do.
This was on a trailer and l3301 with a box blade and FEL, totaling 8000#
View attachment 66350
View attachment 66351
Great pics. I went cheap on the trailer but having seen your trailer I may keep my eye out for a tilt, my Hudson is an old style flat bed equipment with the drop down ramps. I new I was lifting the truck some when loading but I guess I had the tractor in four wheel the other times, this last time I lift the rear of the truck enough going up the ramps I also pushed it and had to back down put the truck and the tractor in four wheel to load up. I looked up the weigh safe hitch and liked what I saw. I think it will be worth it since I'm currently towing three different trailers (dump, horse and equipment) and three different tractors I could be hauling at any given time.
 
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SAR Tracker

Active member

Equipment
LX2610HSDC, FEL, LX2963 Snowblower, BH77 Backhoe, forks
Nov 17, 2020
84
131
33
Central Oregon
Would something like THIS work? Mount it on the fender of the trailer, then watch it to get the right amount of bubble for your application.
 

JerryMT

Active member

Equipment
Kubota M4500, NH TD95D,Ford 4610
Jun 17, 2017
315
42
28
The Palouse - North Idaho
Might sound a bit excessive to some of you but here goes. I have an L2501 4x4 with the 525 loader and QA bucket option.
I tow this tractor around using a couple different trailers and am wondering does anyone know where the load center is on this tractor. I've figured out where the load center is on my HUDSON BROS. trailer to get the best load balance on it but have not found the sweet spot for where the Kubota should be lashed down. Any thoughts out there would be appreciated.
Thanks
Rough rule of thumb, the center of gravity on many tractors is approximately around the gear shift levers of the machine.