How to check tire pressure with liquid filled tires

johnwoodfab

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Equipment
B 20 & BX1870
Apr 30, 2015
15
0
1
North Huntingdon, Pa.,U S A
I have a BX1870 that had liquid filled tires when I got it. Do you have to have the valve at the top of the tire when you check the pressure ?? Do you still put the same pressure that Kubota recomends ??
Thank You, john
 

dirtydeed

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B2650 BH77, BX23TLBM, box blade, rear blade, flail mower, Stump Grinder
Dec 8, 2017
2,051
1,220
113
Wind Gap, PA
Yes. And Yes. You got it.
 
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imnukensc

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Equipment
BX2380
Sep 10, 2015
354
235
43
Midlands of SC
The rears are filled on my 2380. Check pressure with valve stem at top. Recommended pressure for unfilled tires on mine is 17 psi. I run 12 psi as recommended by my dealer. Correct or not, I run 12 and have had no ill effects.
 

D2Cat

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L305DT, B7100HST, TG1860, TG1860D, L4240
Mar 27, 2014
10,455
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40 miles south of Kansas City
You might use something to push in the valve core to let a shot of air out before putting the gauge on. This keeps the juice out of your gauge.
 
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OrangeKrush

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Equipment
BX2680, LA344 with Piranha tooth bar, LP PF 1242, LP Rear Blade, KK 60" BB
Nov 15, 2020
810
342
63
Indy
You might use something to push in the valve core to let a shot of air out before putting the gauge on. This keeps the juice out of your gauge.
Good suggestion.. I used my pressure gauge! 🤬
 

Motion

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Kubota MX5100HST/FEL
Aug 17, 2020
330
128
43
Mandeville Louisiana
Milton makes a tractor tire guage for liquid filled tires. The problem is it doesn' stay out when pressure is applied, you've got to hold it on the stem while reading, but it's better then ruining regular gages.
 
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skeets

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Equipment
BX 2360 /B2601
Oct 2, 2009
12,516
1,351
113
SW Pa
I would recommend that you jack it up enough to take the weight off the tire first, valve stem at 12:00 and put in what the book calls for
 
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jimh406

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Kubota L2501 with R4 tires
Jan 29, 2021
1,070
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Western MT
For sure, use a gauge that can handle liquid. That's why they make them.

I'm pretty sure most people will be able to notice without a gauge if your tire is significantly low. But, tractor tires aren't like a car tire. Well, most of us don't travel very fast, and a tire that is barely low isn't going to be noticeable in the way it drives.
 
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Henro

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Equipment
B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
3,425
1,227
113
North of Pittsburgh PA
If its round it's good, if not, it's too low.
I found this to be true.

A few years ago I noticed my rear liquid filled tires were squatting a bit. Not sure what the pressure was, but I put it back at 12 PSI and have not seen a squat since.

I guess I should actually measure the pressure, but I subscribe to the Freeheeler approach...LOL
 

Freeheeler

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Equipment
b2650 tlb
Aug 16, 2018
550
283
63
Knoxville, TN
For my motorcycle on the racetrack I'm very specific on tire pressures. For the tractor, round is good enough ;)
 
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xrocketengineer

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Equipment
BX1880, FEL, Grapple, 36 in. Forks, 48in. MMM, Quick Spade, Ripper
Nov 14, 2020
409
267
63
Merritt Island, Florida
I bought the Milton gauge and it failed in about a month. It got clogged up inside, the air would not go in nor out. After trying to get it replaced and getting ignored, I managed to unscrew the tire valve fitting end and found a small round sheet metal cover with a tiny orifice inside that was clogged up with our local water deposits. After I unclogged the gauge, it has worked fine since.
While the Milton was out, I used my regular HF cheap gauge for a while and the water did not hurt it at all.
 

Vigo

Member

Equipment
B6100, B8200
Jan 9, 2022
71
19
8
San Antonio Texas
I use a tire inflator with a hose leading to the air chuck, and a trigger to add air. The advantage of this is that even if you allow some fluid into the hose, it won't make it as far as the gauge unless you're actually using the thing to deflate the tire, and when you're done (and hooked to air) you just pull the trigger with the hose loose (ok, held so that it doesn't swing around and smack you in the junk) and blow air through it to 'purge' the liquid you may have allowed into the hose. Doing it this way, i don't bother to put the valve stems in any particular position.
 

jyoutz

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Equipment
MX6000 HST open station, FEL, 6’ cutter, forks, 8’ rear blade, 7’ cultivator
Jan 14, 2019
1,043
517
113
Edgewood, New Mexico
Milton makes a tractor tire guage for liquid filled tires. The problem is it doesn' stay out when pressure is applied, you've got to hold it on the stem while reading, but it's better then ruining regular gages.
I bought one of those on Amazon for less than $10. A must for anyone with liquid filled tires.