Bx2370 tippiness

Mainer1987

New member

Equipment
Bx2370
Sep 6, 2020
2
0
1
Maine
hoping to get some insight on my bx2370. I just bought this used. It has a Curtis steel cab installed, a 54” MMM, FEL, and weight box. Turf tires.
This is the first subcompact tractor I have owned. Prior to this I had a Home Depot cub cadet for mowing so that really is my only reference point regarding stability. My property is relatively sloping, but not excessively so. When first mowing with the box, FEL removed, I couldn’t help but feel like the thing was going to flip over any time I went across any slope whatsoever.
Trying to get a gauge as to whether or not these things are generally pretty unstable, or if the cab raises the CG significantly. In the owners manual I was able to find online, there wasn’t much for max slope. I found some references to 15 degrees in some other forums.

anyone have a Curtis cab that can provide their thoughts?
I have Also looked into wheel spacers/ weights/filling tires. How much will those things help?

lastly, is it best to mow with weight box off as well?

Thanks all. I’m sure I will have more questions as I get some time in in this thing.
I bought it primarily to clear snow in the winter, but have already found it very useful for other stuff. Even with the (Maybe just perceived) stability issues, I am very happy so far.
 

GreensvilleJay

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
1,260
67
48
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
re: any time I went across any slope whatsoever.

THAT is how people get KILLED !!!

Rule #1. never EVER go acorss a slope
Rule #2, if you do , you will,eventually get maimed or die
Rule #3, READ and UNDERSTAND rules #1 and #2.

seriously, adding the cab has raised the CoG(Center of Gravity) up ( higher) so the tractor WILL be more 'tippy', especially compared to a regular 'rider-mower'. Mythical 15 degrees..right, have the 'expert' who said that mow your lawn with tha cab on, just be sure he signs a 'no fault' contract !! You 'might' and I stress 'might' be able to mow, with LOTS of low CoG weight and DRY grass.maybe...but you won't see me trying to.

there was a recent posting about this with pictures, luckily the owner got out alive. many don't , lost 2 'fourwheeler' buddies(17 and 19) trying to cross on the slope.
 

BigG

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Equipment
l2501, FEL, BB, Rotary cutter, rake,spreader, roller, etc. New Holland TL80 A
Sep 14, 2018
1,068
122
63
West Central,FL
Add the wheel weights and load the tires as this will lower the center of gravity. This also improves traction for pulling. Adding wheel spacers to the rear will also help to make it feel more stable. It would be ideal if the wheel tracks were still covered by the mower. A weight box on the rear will again lower the center of gravity but only if the weight is carried lower then the CG. With the weight box on the rear you must pay attention to the front of the tractor. If you run up and down the hills to mow with the weight box on the rear will that make the front end light? The loaded tires and wheel weights will not make the front end lighter. Make sure you load the tires with a liquid that will not freeze in your area.
 

bx tractorjoe

Active member

Equipment
kubota l2501 upgraded from a bx23s john deere 670 husquarvana huv 4421 gxp
Jun 3, 2020
104
35
28
loxahatchee flordia
I would just avoid mowing a slop.. unless you can go down and up.. you will get use to it and go to mow one day when its wet and end up in a shattered glass coffin...

I have a slope on the side of my shop i had no problem mowing with my bx23s with the loader and backhoe off.. when i got my l2501 and tried it , I felt it was going to tip.. especially when it slid an inch I about had a heart attack.. so I just mow it with my 42 inch craftsman sitting sideways and ready to jump off incase.. i mowed it a few times with my old snapper walk behind but we have fire ants and let's just say ... well when you don't notice they are on your boot and find a way in i learned how to do the crazy dance..

Not worth risking your tractor and life to save a little time
 

sheepfarmer

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L3560, B2650, Gator, Ingersoll mower
Nov 14, 2014
3,467
84
48
MidMichigan
Ok it sounds like you have started out with your tractor in the tippiest configuration: no weights and an add on cab, so there are several things besides the NEVER NEVER go crosswise to the slope rule that will help.


I have several steep places that I mowed with an Ingersoll for years. Loading its tires originally for more traction in the winter made a noticeable difference, but I still always arranged the mowing pattern so headed straight forward down hill on the steep places, actually per owner's manual. I recently outfitted a cabbed B2650 intended to take over the mowing and snowblowing chores with all of the things mentioned above, spacers, loaded rear tires. Convinced they help. However, the cab does add to the unstable feeling.
In addition going forward down the steep place with the fwd engaged also helps. We had a lengthy discussion on the forum about whether you could also mow going straight up. Some people do, I think it would depend on how much weight is on the front end. I wouldn't recommend it if the slopes are really steep, it is not impossible to flip a tractor over backwards, or lose traction and find yourself crosswise to the slope and then rolling sideways.

Also be sure you have your ROPS up and seatbelt on. Yes really.
 
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skeets

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Equipment
BX 2360
Oct 2, 2009
10,752
158
63
SW Pa
One more thing besides NOT cutting sideways on a slope,, Check your tire pressure that will also make things feel a bit tipsy. And like the other kids said, wheel weights ( they aint cheap if you can find them) and 2 fill your tires with windshield washer fluid, or beet juice, or just old anti freeze. I dont know where you are but please dont do water,, bad juju. I live down here in the coal country on a hill top so there isnt much flat to mow, it is all hill,, Up and down up and down,, never side to side remember Mr Myogie :)
 
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Ping

Member

Equipment
BX2370-1
Dec 25, 2018
154
18
18
Troy, Ohio
Mainer,
I have a homebrew steel cab I install for cold weather activities. Weights about 365# with its CG about 41" above the floorpan. I have 2" wheel spacers but no wheel weights or fluid. My yards reasonably flat but rough. In the fall mowing leaves, with the cab on, i notice more side-side motion than without the cab. I would never think of driving side hill with that much weight up high. As others have said, avoid side hill situations and if possible add weight down low to reduce your pucker factor. Hope this helps.
Regards,
2018-12-1(6) - Copy.jpg
 

MadMax31

Member

Equipment
BX23S, 60" MMM
Nov 5, 2014
756
0
16
New York
I have the Curtis Cab on my BX, I have a 60” deck. Im running 2” spacers and shes tippy. I have undulating terrain, and I often hit the slopes at an angle. Not dead across but rather a 45 to help alleviate the pucker factor. The first 2 years I didnt have the cab and Im thinking the windshield kinda “framing” my view makes it appear more tippy than it actually is.

With your 54” deck, you should be able to run 1.5” spacers.
 

NHSleddog

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650
Dec 19, 2019
1,026
315
83
Southern, NH
Never travel on a slope?

Where do you guys live? Aside from my garage, my tractor is very rarely on "level" ground. The earth isn't flat anywhere near me.

Travel safely on the slope would be my advice. Telling someone not to travel on a slope in my state would be telling them not to use their tractor. Our highways in NH would be overgrown if the state guys would not run their Kubotas on slopes. I can't remember ever hearing about one of them tipping over and we have a lot of them.

I recently did a job on a hillside (very steep slope) spreading 200 yards of heavy topsoil. It was fantastic for me because it was the first time I could really (and safely) find the tipping point on my B2650. I knew where it was on my old NH from years of use but I have not had a good/safe chance to find it yet on the Kubota.

I have heard a lot of complaints about the BX and being tippy with the loader. If you have a non-level situation, the best advice I have read is use spacers on the wheels and add ballast to the tires and 3 point.
 
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Henro

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Equipment
B2910, BX2200
May 24, 2019
367
26
28
North of Pittsburgh PA
Never travel on a slope?

Where do you guys live? Aside from my garage, my tractor is very rarely on "level" ground. The earth isn't flat anywhere near me.

Travel safely on the slope would be my advice. Telling someone not to travel on a slope in my state would be telling them not to use their tractor. Our highways in NH would be overgrown if the state guys would not run their Kubotas on slopes. I can't remember ever hearing about one of them tipping over and we have a lot of them.

I recently did a job on a hillside (very steep slope) spreading 200 yards of heavy topsoil. It was fantastic for me because it was the first time I could really (and safely) find the tipping point on my B2650. I knew where it was on my old NH from years of use but I have not had a good/safe chance to find it yet on the Kubota.

I have heard a lot of complaints about the BX and being tippy with the loader. If you have a non-level situation, the best advice I have read is use spacers on the wheels and add ballast to the tires and 3 point.
Agree about running tractors on slopes. I also have nearly nothing flat here.

Curious how you safely found the tipping point on your tractor! I found it once in my B2910 and afterwards concluded there was no way (safe or otherwise) to really know when it might happen!

EEEDFB50-C5FB-4CFB-A21C-62B0C3B6DEA4.jpeg
 

bluedunn

Member

Equipment
BX1860, FEL, MMM, Heavy Hitch Back Plow Blade
Aug 29, 2019
206
3
18
Thetford, VT
Never travel on a slope?

Where do you guys live? Aside from my garage, my tractor is very rarely on "level" ground. The earth isn't flat anywhere near me.

Travel safely on the slope would be my advice. Telling someone not to travel on a slope in my state would be telling them not to use their tractor. Our highways in NH would be overgrown if the state guys would not run their Kubotas on slopes. I can't remember ever hearing about one of them tipping over and we have a lot of them.

I recently did a job on a hillside (very steep slope) spreading 200 yards of heavy topsoil. It was fantastic for me because it was the first time I could really (and safely) find the tipping point on my B2650. I knew where it was on my old NH from years of use but I have not had a good/safe chance to find it yet on the Kubota.

I have heard a lot of complaints about the BX and being tippy with the loader. If you have a non-level situation, the best advice I have read is use spacers on the wheels and add ballast to the tires and 3 point.
Same here - not a flat bit of land in site, except for our driveway. I have wheel spacers, ballasted tires (Rim Guard), rear ballast, and keep the loader very, very low (almost touching the ground) when traveling on any land with a slope, no matter how slight.

Be careful out there!
 

NHSleddog

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B2650
Dec 19, 2019
1,026
315
83
Southern, NH
Agree about running tractors on slopes. I also have nearly nothing flat here.

Curious how you safely found the tipping point on your tractor! I found it once in my B2910 and afterwards concluded there was no way (safe or otherwise) to really know when it might happen!
Full bucket at the bank at different angles was one way to easily see where the tires start to leave the ground. There was also a spot where it gradually increased in pitch and you could "force" the tires off based on bucket position and handling.
 

Henro

Active member

Equipment
B2910, BX2200
May 24, 2019
367
26
28
North of Pittsburgh PA
Full bucket at the bank at different angles was one way to easily see where the tires start to leave the ground. There was also a spot where it gradually increased in pitch and you could "force" the tires off based on bucket position and handling.
You must have great reflexes! :)

If one is on a side slope and a rear wheel on the up hill side leaves the ground...pretty scary.

Immediately drop bucket and I guess turn downhill.

For most people one time experiencing an event like that is more than enough...it seems...some do not recover.

When I tipped my tractor on its side my bucket was empty and I was using the box blade. Not much of a slope, but I had built up a surface, the edge of which sloped down about 2 feet. I think I was in a bit of a daze, after so much back and forth movements. Got close to the edge and slid down that 2 feet and when I hit the bottom, tractor very sowly tipped on its side. it really does not take much sometimes. Front tires are foam filled and rears have liquid in them.

It has been years since that happened and I am still gun shy when using that tractor on side slopes.
 

NHSleddog

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2650
Dec 19, 2019
1,026
315
83
Southern, NH
You must have great reflexes! :)

If one is on a side slope and a rear wheel on the up hill side leaves the ground...pretty scary.

Immediately drop bucket and I guess turn downhill.

For most people one time experiencing an event like that is more than enough...it seems...some do not recover.

When I tipped my tractor on its side my bucket was empty and I was using the box blade. Not much of a slope, but I had built up a surface, the edge of which sloped down about 2 feet. I think I was in a bit of a daze, after so much back and forth movements. Got close to the edge and slid down that 2 feet and when I hit the bottom, tractor very sowly tipped on its side. it really does not take much sometimes. Front tires are foam filled and rears have liquid in them.

It has been years since that happened and I am still gun shy when using that tractor on side slopes.
LOL - In my defense, I have always been a thrill seeker in search of top speed. I grew up on construction equipment and have rolled a few trucks but never a loader/tractor. Lots of 2 wheel action though.
 

armylifer

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX1860, FEL, RCK54P MMM, BB1548 Box Scraper, Quick Hitch, Piranha Bar, BX6315
Mar 26, 2013
974
46
28
Thurston County, WA
One thing that you could do to make the tractor less tippy is to take off the loader when mowing. I also have loaded tires, 1 3/4" spacers, and 240 lbs of weight on my 3 point quick hitch. The slope at the drainage ditch varies between 30 degrees for most of the ditch and goes to 35 degrees or more at the culvert. Obviously, I do not mow sideways anywhere near the culvert, but I have been mowing 90% of that ditch sideways for the past 7 years without mishap. One just needs to use caution and good sense when mowing sideways along a slope.

To say that one should never mow sideways along a slope is perhaps an opinion that some share, but not a practical suggestion for everyone.
 

Henro

Active member

Equipment
B2910, BX2200
May 24, 2019
367
26
28
North of Pittsburgh PA
One thing that you could do to make the tractor less tippy is to take off the loader when mowing. I also have loaded tires, 1 3/4" spacers, and 240 lbs of weight on my 3 point quick hitch. The slope at the drainage ditch varies between 30 degrees for most of the ditch and goes to 35 degrees or more at the culvert. Obviously, I do not mow sideways anywhere near the culvert, but I have been mowing 90% of that ditch sideways for the past 7 years without mishap. One just needs to use caution and good sense when mowing sideways along a slope.

To say that one should never mow sideways along a slope is perhaps an opinion that some share, but not a practical suggestion for everyone.
Weight on the 3PH may actually be raising your center of gravity and detracting from side slope stability. But that is difficult to determine not knowing where the tractor center of gravity is...