BX loader capability vs. 1series JD

TRUCK3

New member
May 5, 2022
14
3
3
Upstate NY
I was reading another post about analysis paralysis - I think I'm there. Starting looking for a CUT in late spring, based on specs and just looking at various tractors on the dealers lots, I thought the B01 series would be about right for me. Problem was I found the operator station somewhat cramped and not helped by the treadle pedal mounted above the floor board. Starting looking at the B2650/LX2610 which hasn't been helped by the lack of dealer inventory. Finally got to run a B2650, but seemed on the big side to be able to use around the yard in the vicinity of the house.

So I started looking at JD, 1 series and 2 series and the 1025R/2025R seemed about the right size/capability. I was planning on buying used, but I was seeing fairly good deals on the JD 1023E model. Didn't really consider the 1023E, but decided to try one out this AM. It would probably work for me, and I figure I could learn to work with the lack of position control.

I figured since I was looking at a 1025 and the 1023 JDs, I probably should try a BX. Local Kubota dealers have very low inventory, but I got lucky and one dealer had a BX2380 on the lot, was sold, but I was able to try out.

I would say I was impressed with BX. A little more hydro whine than the JD, but otherwise seemed more refined than the JD 1 series tractors. Not by a lot, but enough to notice. I like the set up and openness of the operator station and the treadle pedal was fine when mounted below the floor board, maybe even better than twin pedals on the JD, at least equal. I liked the better visibility of the BX with the shorter hood. The BX seems just a bit more $$ than the 1023E new or used and with the more upgraded features, probably the better overall better deal in my view than a 1023. I also found the 1/4 inching 3 pt control much better than the 3 pt. control on the 1023.

And then I started comparing to the 1025R, which the BX would be less $$. It has actual 3 pt position control, but otherwise, BX seemed to stack up pretty well against the 1025R as well.

The only concern I have is FEL capacity. On paper, the LA344 does give up some specs against the JD 120R. Hard to know in actual use what that means. I watched the TTWT JD 1025R vs. BX2680 comparison videos, but there were no comparisons in typical movement of materials - soil, gravel, etc. I'm not getting the FEL to move pallets of material/equipment which seemed to highlight the weakness of the LA344 vs. JD 120R.

Wanted to see if I could get some feedback from BX owners using the FEL moving soil, gravel, or stone and for any BX owners that bought after comparing against the JD 1023/1025, what did you see as tipping the scale in favor of the BX? I would probably be looking at a BX2380 or 2680. Thanks
 

DustyRusty

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,969
1,188
113
North East
I have owned 2 BX tractors, and even though the bucket is a little on the anemic side when it comes to handling materials such as loam, or stone, I have found it is overall an acceptable machine. I like the fact that both of mine had backhoes, and it was a strong digging machine, so long as I didn't run into a boulder that was heavier than the machine could handle. For those types of rocks, you definitely need a bigger machine than the BX. I have never been a fan of the JD tractors, but I do like their color scheme.
 

GreensvilleJay

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23-S
Apr 2, 2019
4,919
1,629
113
Greensville,Ontario,Canada
I had a quiklook and the 120R PIN-ON lifts 533# according to JD, so similar to my BX23S WITH SSQA, so my BX is 'better' !
I've moved 1000s of buckets of dirt, pony poop, compost, gravel and rocks every year ,for the past 4 years and while it'd be nice to carry more, I KNOW it wasn't designed as a 'loader' but an 'all around' machine.
A few more trips,couple hours seat time, doesn't bother me.
 
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PaulL

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Equipment
B2601
Jul 17, 2017
1,304
517
113
NZ
My BX was fine. In general most tractors will lift a bucket load of whatever - because the bucket is sized to fit the loader lift. The BX may, however, have a smaller bucket than the JD. In real world operation you don't notice that.

My experience was that my bigger problem was filling the bucket than it was what the machine could lift. The machine will lift a heaping bucket of most stuff, but operator skill is required to actually get a heaped bucket. I gave up more lift because of my lack of talent than I did because of machine limitations.

I believe the BX is a more refined machine, they've been making them for a long time and improving them frequently. In the US I believe the SSQA is an important/useful feature, in my part of the world there are very few SSQA attachments small enough to go on a SCUT, and SSQA isn't even offered as an option. I got a pin-on quick attach, which actually gives me more lift capacity, and since the only other implement I use is forks, I just got my forks modified for Kubota pin-on.

I think the JD 1 series is a bit bigger than the BX. The BX is a very small tractor. I eventually upgraded to the B01, which is a much better machine (in my opinion) than the BX. The treadle pedal on it is a bit stiff, but you get used to it. The extra ground clearance, 3 speed gearbox, and much greater 3ph lift capacity (plus about 20-30% extra of everything else) was well worth it for me.
 
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Crash277

Well-known member

Equipment
BX23S
Jan 17, 2021
781
573
93
Canada
I have moved 100s of tons of dirt rocks and gravel. A full bucket is a full bucket. Even if the JD can lift a little more weight: if the bucket capacity is the same, then as far as moving agrigate they would be equal for that task.
 

Vigo

Active member

Equipment
B6100, B8200
Jan 9, 2022
138
60
28
San Antonio Texas
I think the JD does come with a larger bucket.

Lift capacity is one thing, but i think breakout force might be the more useful measure if you are planning to dig or break ground a lot with the loader.

I have a B6100 that will lift about 500lbs to full height, and a B8200 that'll do around 700lbs to full height. Surprisingly, the 8200 FEELS massively more powerful, but most of that is coming from its much, much greater breakout force. They both have 48" buckets and the 6100 feels like it needs a 42, and the 8200 feels like it needs a 54. Both on the list.. someday.

Also, the 8200 feels a lot more powerful pushing into piles or the ground just because it weighs so much more (traction). It has a backhoe on it, and 13.6-16 filled rear tires. I bring this up because that is a MAJOR difference between a 1025 and 2025. The 2025 has much larger rear tires. By itself this does not mean much, but if you compare the weight they will take in fill, the larger tires on the 2025 become a huge advantage in terms of the ability of the 'bare' tractor (i.e. excluding 3pt attachments) to use the loader productively, both in terms of stability from counterbalancing a load, and traction to push the bucket into material.
 
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mikester

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M59 TLB
Oct 21, 2017
1,743
663
113
Canada
www.divergentstuff.ca
I think the JD does come with a larger bucket.

Lift capacity is one thing, but i think breakout force might be the more useful measure if you are planning to dig or break ground a lot with the loader.

I have a B6100 that will lift about 500lbs to full height, and a B8200 that'll do around 700lbs to full height. Surprisingly, the 8200 FEELS massively more powerful, but most of that is coming from its much, much greater breakout force. They both have 48" buckets and the 6100 feels like it needs a 42, and the 8200 feels like it needs a 54. Both on the list.. someday.

Also, the 8200 feels a lot more powerful pushing into piles or the ground just because it weighs so much more (traction). It has a backhoe on it, and 13.6-16 filled rear tires. I bring this up because that is a MAJOR difference between a 1025 and 2025. The 2025 has much larger rear tires. By itself this does not mean much, but if you compare the weight they will take in fill, the larger tires on the 2025 become a huge advantage in terms of the ability of the 'bare' tractor (i.e. excluding 3pt attachments) to use the loader productively, both in terms of stability from counterbalancing a load, and traction to push the bucket into material.
I had a neighbour who bought the JD with a larger bucket...he couldn't lift it when it was full of soil.