Bseries valve clearances

edowns

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B1600
Dec 21, 2011
19
0
1
Salop, UK
I have a B1600 tractor and a Work Shop Manual for B1710 to B2710. Not ideal but the best I have managed so far. I want to check and probably adjust the valve clearances.
The WSM refers to a tming cover on the clutch housingneeding to be removed to make the TC /TDC mark visible.

So .... where is this timing cover on a B1600 type tractor?
 

jkrubi12

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B2601HSD, LA435/QA 54, LP SGC0554, LP BB1254
Sep 24, 2012
46
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right coast
I suggest you try to ID the motor, then google that for more info. Look on the left side (iirc) of the block (as facing forward) for the motor designation.(y)
 

North Idaho Wolfman

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Forget the timing cover or marks on the flywheel, it's a waste of time.
Pull the valve cover, not which vales are intake and which valves are exhaust (they will be inline with the ports).
Turn the engine until one valve is open (you'll be able to see it) then set the other to .007.
You can also watch the valves and rocker arms move, and you can just adjust that valve when they are just past fully closed.
 
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lugbolt

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ZG127S-54
Oct 15, 2015
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yep eoic method. Hasn't failed me yet. That's not eieio by the way :D

EOIC-exhaust opens, intake closes---meaning when the exhaust valve just begins to open, adjust intake valve on that cylinder. When intake valve is just about closed, adjust the exh valve on that cylinder. Move to next cylinder and repeat.

you get good at it after doing it a few hundred times

i learned this from a top fuel team when I was at the races as a kid, and it stuck. I use it on my own car.

there's another way to do it as well but requires removal of a glow plug. Just use eoic, it's accurate and easier.
 
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Henro

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B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
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yep eoic method. Hasn't failed me yet. That's not eieio by the way :D
...(snip)...

there's another way to do it as well but requires removal of a glow plug. Just use eoic, it's accurate and easier.
I need to check the valve clearances in my tractors.

Are you saying doing it the way you described can be done without removing the glow plugs or injectors? If so, what is the best way to turn the engine? (I could probably figure something out myself, but can't hurt to learn from a pro!)
 
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DustyRusty

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BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
1,797
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Why do you think that the valves need adjustment? Having done this type of work on older gasoline engines, I know that it can be tricky and that if you make a mistake, it is worse than had you left it alone. Unless your engine isn't running correctly, my suggestion is to leave it alone or have someone with more knowledge teach you how to do it. I have said for years, that you can buy the best tools and have every manual that was ever printed, but that doesn't make you a good mechanic. Good mechanics learn from other good mechanics in the beginning and then progress moving on to more complex learning.
 

lynnmor

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B2601-1
May 3, 2021
557
371
63
Red Lion
In nearly all 4 cycle engines since the beginning of their invention, valves are adjusted while the cam follower is on the base circle of the camshaft. If you can rotate the crankshaft by hand and can see a pulley or damper it can be done this way and is usually better than any printed instructions:

Remove valve cover so you can adjust and see the valves.
Rotate engine till a valve is pushed all the way open.
Chalk mark a reference point on the pulley/damper.
Rotate the engine one full turn, no need to be real precise.
Adjust that valve.
Repeat for each valve.

Trying to find a point where an intake and exhaust valve are both on the base circle might result in an error since a follower may be starting to climb a ramp. Doing it this way will insure that the lobe is opposite the follower. Yes, it may be a little more work than doing multiple valves at a time, but you will survive.

1652630967173.png
 
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Dieseldonato

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B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
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Adjusting valves on these isn't hard by anymeans. Guess I use a bit different version of the eoic thing. Spin the engine over and watch the valve. Intake open, close adjust that cylinder move to the next one.
 
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Dieseldonato

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B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
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In nearly all 4 cycle engines since the beginning of their invention, valves are adjusted while the cam follower is on the base circle of the camshaft. If you can rotate the crankshaft by hand and can see a pulley or damper it can be done this way and is usually better than any printed instructions:

Remove valve cover so you can adjust and see the valves.
Rotate engine till a valve is pushed all the way open.
Chalk mark a reference point on the pulley/damper.
Rotate the engine one full turn, no need to be real precise.
Adjust that valve.
Repeat for each valve.

Trying to find a point where an intake and exhaust valve are both on the base circle might result in an error since a follower may be starting to climb a ramp. Doing it this way will insure that the lobe is opposite the follower. Yes, it may be a little more work than doing multiple valves at a time, but you will survive.

View attachment 80068
Cat engines have a little chart in their manuals for what valves to set on a rotation. Only have to spin the engine over once after your on TDC #1. Makes life so much easier.
 
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whitetiger

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Kubota tech..BX2370, RCK60, B7100HST, RTV900 w plow, Ford 1100 FWA
Nov 20, 2011
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Cat engines have a little chart in their manuals for what valves to set on a rotation. Only have to spin the engine over once after your on TDC #1. Makes life so much easier.
Kubota has a chart in their WSM that shows it as well.
 
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Henro

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B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
3,425
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North of Pittsburgh PA
Why do you think that the valves need adjustment?
In case this question was directed at me...

Only (in my case) because the recommended period is something like 600 hours, and my tractors have 1300 and 1600 hours on them, maybe more...with out checking valve clearance yet...

I don't think the process is rocket science as far as the check/adjustment of each valve goes.

Just much simpler if one does not need to remove glow plugs or injectors when turning the engine manually.

Just not sure best way to manually turn the engine when doing it, if compression is not released by removing glow plugs or injectors...
 
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DustyRusty

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BX23S
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In case this question was directed at me...

Only (in my case) because the recommended period is something like 600 hours, and my tractors have 1300 and 1600 hours on them, maybe more...with out checking valve clearance yet...

I don't think the process is rocket science as far as the check/adjustment of each valve goes.

Just much simpler if one does not need to remove glow plugs or injectors when turning the engine manually.

Just not sure best way to manually turn the engine when doing it, if compression is not released by removing glow plugs or injectors...
Did you register as "edowns" and make the original post?
 

edowns

New member

Equipment
B1600
Dec 21, 2011
19
0
1
Salop, UK
Thanks all. I'll give it ago this week and report back.
As regards turning the engine over, that's the next trcky bit as I cant' [yet] get at the flyweel and guess I will have to rotate the wheels while in gear.
PS I'm doing this as the increasing clattering noise sounds like tappets. It may not be the clearances but its a starting point.
 

Henro

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Equipment
B2910, BX2200, KX41-2V mini Ex.
May 24, 2019
3,425
1,227
113
North of Pittsburgh PA
Did you register as "edowns" and make the original post?
No, but I did ask a question just before your reply, and you did not indicate who you were replying to! And if I remember correctly you had also replied to the thread previously…so who you were replying to was unclear at best.

In answer, did you ever consider if you post without indicating who you are replying to, that we can only guess who you could be referring to?

My bold is smaller than your bold! LOL
 

lugbolt

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Equipment
ZG127S-54
Oct 15, 2015
3,686
805
113
Mid, South, USA
The only issue with doing it by the book is that it's a little easier to get confused while doing it (at least for me).

Using eoic it's a lot harder to screw it up. You're just doing one cylinder at a time rather than trying to look at a cheat sheet to know which is open and closed. SBF, SBC, BBM, "LS", Lima 2.3, 385 series, 335 series engines....I've messed with all of them at one point or another. When you start putting cams in them-which increase the duration, lift, etc, you almost have to use eoic, especially when the duration gets on up there. The one in my little SBF powered Maverick is 292 degrees of duration on the intake side and 300 on the exhaust, close to an inch of lift. At TDC the valves are closed but not for very long because of the duration. Thus, when the intake is about closed, I can adjust the ex because the ex is on the base circle. Then when the ex starts to open, the intake is real close to being on the base, so it can be checked. Same deal for all 4 stroke engines that need valve checks and kubota is no different other than it doesn't have as much cam duration. Not nearly as much.

Kind of rare for a kubota to need much adjustment at 1000 hours use, but they are usually a couple thousandths on the looser side by then. If much more than that there is normally another issue. The big reason for checking them is to find that other issue before it swarms, say, a rare loose valve seat or whatever.

Yes go/no-go feeler gauges are wonderful.
 

lynnmor

Well-known member

Equipment
B2601-1
May 3, 2021
557
371
63
Red Lion
The only issue with doing it by the book is that it's a little easier to get confused while doing it (at least for me).

Using eoic it's a lot harder to screw it up. You're just doing one cylinder at a time rather than trying to look at a cheat sheet to know which is open and closed. SBF, SBC, BBM, "LS", Lima 2.3, 385 series, 335 series engines....I've messed with all of them at one point or another. When you start putting cams in them-which increase the duration, lift, etc, you almost have to use eoic, especially when the duration gets on up there. The one in my little SBF powered Maverick is 292 degrees of duration on the intake side and 300 on the exhaust, close to an inch of lift. At TDC the valves are closed but not for very long because of the duration. Thus, when the intake is about closed, I can adjust the ex because the ex is on the base circle. Then when the ex starts to open, the intake is real close to being on the base, so it can be checked. Same deal for all 4 stroke engines that need valve checks and kubota is no different other than it doesn't have as much cam duration. Not nearly as much.
And that is why I posted my method.
 

Dieseldonato

Active member

Equipment
B7510 hydro, yanmar ym146, cub cadet 1450, 582,782
Mar 15, 2022
300
150
43
Pa
The only issue with doing it by the book is that it's a little easier to get confused while doing it (at least for me).

Using eoic it's a lot harder to screw it up. You're just doing one cylinder at a time rather than trying to look at a cheat sheet to know which is open and closed. SBF, SBC, BBM, "LS", Lima 2.3, 385 series, 335 series engines....I've messed with all of them at one point or another. When you start putting cams in them-which increase the duration, lift, etc, you almost have to use eoic, especially when the duration gets on up there. The one in my little SBF powered Maverick is 292 degrees of duration on the intake side and 300 on the exhaust, close to an inch of lift. At TDC the valves are closed but not for very long because of the duration. Thus, when the intake is about closed, I can adjust the ex because the ex is on the base circle. Then when the ex starts to open, the intake is real close to being on the base, so it can be checked. Same deal for all 4 stroke engines that need valve checks and kubota is no different other than it doesn't have as much cam duration. Not nearly as much.

Kind of rare for a kubota to need much adjustment at 1000 hours use, but they are usually a couple thousandths on the looser side by then. If much more than that there is normally another issue. The big reason for checking them is to find that other issue before it swarms, say, a rare loose valve seat or whatever.

Yes go/no-go feeler gauges are wonderful.
I use a paint marker as I go, just give the rocker a little dot to mark it that it's adjusted. Don't really have to worry about high lift/duration cams in diesels. Even the stage 4 in my cummins isn't what we would consider high lift/duration in a gas engine. I think either method would work well for the kubota adjustment.
 
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