brush hogging with rocks

virginiavenom

Member
Jan 30, 2015
373
9
18
Sherman, TX
still trying to clear the property and now that I've gotten most of the pasture cleared at least at the surface of sandstone rocks and boulders, I've got questions.....I've been using my L4060 open with a RCR1872 6 foot brush cutter. I've been mowing almost exclusively in medium range (HST) sometimes I kick it into high of the medium range.....it bogs down sometimes as a result of high grass and I still haven't taken the metal band off the back so it can't get clippings out fast enough. once I take this band off and it's not all damp, should I be mowing in low high or high? or will power consumption as a result of the higher gear be too much? I worry about hitting the big boulders that are unmoveable that are mostly below the surface but slightly above and the mower hits/grazes a little. it jostles the tractor decently, should I stop the mower or just keep going no big deal. I have no saplings or anything like that to deal with. a big blackberry bush is on my list of things to deal with.....very big. any issue getting after that thing? back into it with the 3 point lifted up? or is there a better way to deal with that?
 

JasonW

Member
Jan 29, 2015
118
19
18
Mobile, AL
How much experience do you have with a bush hog? They can really take a beating but they are not indestructible. I'm guessing the rocks are big enough to hit the blades, there is nothing you can really do but I would go slowest possible cutting unknown ground. I've hit a chain link fences, wooden posts, rocks, stumps, and the strangest was a pile of brake drums all in established deer fields.
As far as the blackberry bush if you don't have a loader I would just pull it up with a strap in a slip loop. Use caution of course.
 

jnldr

New member

Equipment
L2800
Mar 12, 2010
114
0
0
Knox TN
My 3540 went through a blackberry thicket no problem. I lowered the bucket and bent it over as I hogged through it.
If it was one or two large bushes with large bases I would use loader if you got one or hook a chain to it.
On thick fields I hog on low/medium...


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virginiavenom

Member
Jan 30, 2015
373
9
18
Sherman, TX
I should note this particular blackberry bush is at least 12 feet high and probably 30-40 feet in diameter. it's a hulk. I've got a FEL. makes sense to push it down and just drive over it? any chances of tire issues with new R4s? I've only ever mowed established fields that are regularly mowed.
 

scdeerslayer

New member

Equipment
MX5200DT
May 23, 2016
434
1
0
SC
I don't know about a black berry "bush". Here they are vining briars. With what you describe there's probably at least several dozen individual plants. I've never seen them more than about waist high without having trees, stumps, brush and/or man-made structures in there that the briars are growing on.

Wild black berries are excellent to eat and make excellent jelly and homemade ice cream if you run them through a food mill to remove the seeds. If it's a well established patch that produces well I might think twice about removing them.
 

OldeEnglish

New member

Equipment
B7100D, MMM, B205 Dozer Blade, woods m48, b2910
Jul 13, 2014
768
2
0
Western, MA
That monster machine you have should tear right through that blackberry bush. My little b7100 was tearing through fields of them about 6'-8' tall. My machine sits really low so it's about impossible to go through them going forward because they will tear me up, so I have been hitting them in reverse. You my be able to go forward.

As far as the rocks go, keep your hand on the 3pt lift ready to lift the hog if you come across some rocks. Slow and steady usually is the best way to go at first. One everything is wacked down mark the rocks that you think will be a problem with steaks or orange spray paint( it's a good job for kids:D), and work on removing them.
 

jnldr

New member

Equipment
L2800
Mar 12, 2010
114
0
0
Knox TN
That's bigger bushes than we have here as well. Your machine should have no problem. The main reason to use the FEL is to keep the bushes off you. Don't bend them over to much as to make it harder on your hog.
This would be my approach.
If it's too much strain on the hog you will know and then you can dig out with FEL and burn themZ
MUCH easier to chop them up!!!


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