Better traction on a B3000

Snakebyte

New member

Equipment
B3000
Jun 1, 2022
12
12
3
51
Oklahoma
Looking for the best ways to improve my traction for my B3000. I have a lot of sand around my place (live at the lake) and traction is at a premium. Whenever I get any kind of load in the bucket, the tractor barely moves with the rear tire spin. Wondering if putting weight in the tires might help as it seems kind of nose heavy, or maybe just buying and attaching some weight to the rear might fix my issue. Looking to get a box blade anyway, so might be prudent before I spend a bunch of money on other fixes. Looking for ideas, and I know there are some serious tractor gurus on here (this is my first tractor). Thanks in advance folks.
 
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RCW

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
BX2360, FEL, MMM, BX2750D snowblower. 1953 Minneapolis Moline ZAU
Apr 28, 2013
6,826
2,074
113
Chenango County, NY
If you're doing loader work and having traction issues, I'd probably start with a good bit of rear ballast on the 3 point hitch. Maybe something in the 6-700 pound range.

Can be done with a ballast box, carry-all loaded up, or a heavy implement. I use a carry-all or a box blade quite often, and they serve other purposes too.

Will help with loader operation and also plant the rear tires.

Also, if working in sandy spot with the loader, I'd also put the tractor in 4WD if not already done so. Will help traction, but also help control and braking if working on slopes. Light rear tires can also lead to uncontrolled skids on slopes. 4WD will allow the fronts to help control that.
 
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rc51stierhoff

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Equipment
B2650, MX6000
Sep 13, 2021
756
588
93
Ohio
Fluid in tires helps, but I think depending on the work you are trying to do a some weight hanging off the rear end as ballast would be helpful too. I run filled tires and a ballast box anytime doing loader work. I’d follow RCW’s prescription above.
 
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85Hokie

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BX-25D ,PTB. Under Armor, '90&'92-B7100HST's, '06 BX1850 FEL
Jul 13, 2013
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Bedford - VA
Both guys nailed it ......

4wd drive is a must

Fluid filled is a must for everything short of grass cutting on flat areas.......

IF you can place weight on the rear - that WILL work better in the physics aspect of things and is the best answer, because it can be added and taken off somewhat easily.
 
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Sep 3, 2022
63
30
18
America
Heavier is generally better. I like "Tractor Mike", good simple explanations.

Proper Ballast:

Questions answered:
 
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War Eagle

Member

Equipment
2012 B3000HSDC and Allis Chalmer 5020
Jan 15, 2017
92
14
8
Nampa, Idaho
X3 what the above have said. I have this same tractor but with a cab. I have put inner tubes in the rear tires and put -20 degree window washer fluid in my tires. They hold a little over 17 gallons each and that adds about 138 pounds in each tire. I also carry a 6' box blade on the rear.

Winters here sometimes require chains so I have also added 2" wheel spacers on the rear for chain clearance and all these things have added stability and ballast.
 
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Snakebyte

New member

Equipment
B3000
Jun 1, 2022
12
12
3
51
Oklahoma
Heavier is generally better. I like "Tractor Mike", good simple explanations.

Proper Ballast:

Questions answered:
Great videos, so what do ya'll suggest for liquid in the tires, and is it pretty easy to do yourself, or is that a dealer task? I'm pretty handy, and a car guy, so not worried about busting knuckles around any kind of vehicle, but never added fluid to any tires I've ever had.
 

rc51stierhoff

Well-known member

Equipment
B2650, MX6000
Sep 13, 2021
756
588
93
Ohio
Depending on how cold it gets and/or how much weight you want there are options. Rimguard is pretty common in OH. I had mine filled by dealer…but I think you could either take your machine to a local service center and they will fill or you could have them over for a visit. I am not sure what options are to buy flyid and take home do it yourself, but I suspect you can. I believe owners manual has a fill line cartoon as a reference.

 
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Snakebyte

New member

Equipment
B3000
Jun 1, 2022
12
12
3
51
Oklahoma
Ok, so went my usual route, and prolly overdid it. :) Having the local Kubota dealer fill tires with RimGuard, and while she's in the shop, having them do the first service on it to ensure everything is clean. This tractor is new (to me) so figured this would be a great time to find any issues that might bite me later. Also bought a ballast box so that could add an extra 800 lbs. I bought it as much for the added storage (holding rakes, shovels, chainsaws, etc) when doing work around the property as the weight. Now I just gotta find some Kubota Orange paint so it doesn't look like my Kubota is being chased by a John Deere box... :)
 
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DustyRusty

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Equipment
BX23S
Nov 8, 2015
2,251
1,448
113
North East
I called a local Kubota tractor dealer to find out the cost of having Rim Guard installed in the rear tires of a Kubota BX23S (24/12/12) and was told by the service department it was $3.50 per gallon and "about" $200 for labor. Looking up the quantity suggested on the Rim Guard website it is 8 gallons per tire. $3.50 X 16 gallons (2 tires)=$56 plus $200 labor = $256 total
I watched the video above and at the 4-minute mark, he indicates that they let the dealers set their own pricing but its cost is 28 cents per pound times 11 pounds per gallon = $3.08 per gallon of product. Based on this cost, the dealer's markup of 42 cents per gallon is quite reasonable. Just don't know how long it takes to install 8 gallons of product per tire.
I just called another local Kubota dealer and was quoted $360 per tire for a total of $720, plus tax.
My worn-out old Kubota tires that were filled with Rim Guard 20 years ago suddenly have become much more valuable if I can figure out a way to get the fluid out and back into new tires.
 
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Snakebyte

New member

Equipment
B3000
Jun 1, 2022
12
12
3
51
Oklahoma
I called a local Kubota tractor dealer to find out the cost of having Rim Guard installed in the rear tires of a Kubota BX23S (24/12/12) and was told by the service department it was $3.50 per gallon and "about" $200 for labor. Looking up the quantity suggested on the Rim Guard website it is 8 gallons per tire. $3.50 X 16 gallons (2 tires)=$56 plus $200 labor = $256 total
I watched the video above and at the 4-minute mark, he indicates that they let the dealers set their own pricing but its cost is 28 cents per pound times 11 pounds per gallon = $3.08 per gallon of product. Based on this cost, the dealer's markup of 42 cents per gallon is quite reasonable. Just don't know how long it takes to install 8 gallons of product per tire.
I just called another local Kubota dealer and was quoted $360 per tire for a total of $720, plus tax.
My worn-out old Kubota tires that were filled with Rim Guard 20 years ago suddenly have become much more valuable if I can figure out a way to get the fluid out and back into new tires.

My cost came to $400 for parts/fluid/labor. I didn't break it down, but it sounded pretty good for my B3000 from what I've seen elsewhere. I AM paying an extra $160 for pickup and delivery, but I don't have a vehicle or trailer (yet) capable of towing the tractor, hence why I decided to get the service as well, since it's in the shop anyway.
 

old and tired

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Equipment
L2800 HST
Dec 8, 2019
984
445
63
Raleigh, NC / Hillsville, Va
The Ballast box will help the most.

What tires do you have? and what pressure do you have them set at?

If you have R4 / Industrial tires, they just suck for traction and letting air out does not help them much. If you have R1's / Agricultural tires, running them with less pressure to the point where they squat down helps put more surface to the ground.
 
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Sporto

New member

Equipment
B2601, FDR1660, RTA1258, BB1560, LR1672
Mar 20, 2021
20
19
3
Manitoba Canada
Wow the price of Rim Gard seems a little steep where you guys are I just had my B01 done was $200 Can ($100 US;))total for both rear tires was $4.94 a gallon and $25 a tire for installation ( I took the tractor to them) apparently the front desk guy thought 12-16.5 tires go on the front so when I got the tractor home, I checked the rear tires and low and behold air only. Back to the dealer and this time they filled the right ones, however they offered to pump out the fronts but I declined so got the fronts done for free, now when I mow with the loader off front end stays on the ground. Best mistake ever:)
 
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Snakebyte

New member

Equipment
B3000
Jun 1, 2022
12
12
3
51
Oklahoma
The Ballast box will help the most.

What tires do you have? and what pressure do you have them set at?

If you have R4 / Industrial tires, they just suck for traction and letting air out does not help them much. If you have R1's / Agricultural tires, running them with less pressure to the point where they squat down helps put more surface to the ground.
will I be able to pull that info off the tires themselves? I'll get whatever the tire stamp is and post here.
 

Vigo

Active member

Equipment
B6100, B8200
Jan 9, 2022
179
81
28
San Antonio Texas

From left to right, R4, R3 , R1. Also Industrial, Turf, Ag.

I dont see the term bar tire used much anymore, i think because the proliferation of r4s made it kind of overly vague.