B2601 / LA434 loader not level

msmcknight

Member

Equipment
B2601
Oct 30, 2017
57
0
6
Statesville, NC, USA
Hi everyone,

I have a new B2601 (22 hours) and one thing I have noticed is that the front loader isn't level side-to-side. It's nearly and inch off-bubble. For rough tasks, this isn't so much of an issue, but when trying to use pallet forks or scrape a level layer away with the bucket, it matters.

Is this something that others have seen? If so, what is the fix? I'm hoping it's something I can do myself without having to haul it to the dealership for a warranty repair.

I am very confident that it's not something I have done as I've barely used the loader for anything heavy thus far.

Thank you,
-Michael
 

Kennyd4110

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Lifetime Member
Sep 7, 2013
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Westminster, MD
www.boltonhooks.com
In general use, you’ll never notice 1” out of level, but sometimes all the mounting hardware can can loosened and everything reset to make it better. Yes this has all been discussed before if you do some searching.

But, the very first thing to check is the pressure in the REAR tires, if one is considerably lower than the other it will make the loader unlevel as you described.
 
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1970cs

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Apr 26, 2016
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Grand Ledge
Also you need to check, the O.D. of the rear tires. The supplier has been known for supplying tires one bigger than the other.

Pat
 

sdk1968

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
B2601HSD & CK4010HST 4WD/FEL
Oct 19, 2016
907
15
18
Ohio
YEP. really common problem.

lots of threads on this here on OTT.

making sure the rear tires are perfectly the same helped mine "some"...

still never completely got it level & Kubota still has no real fix for it.

they readjusted mine when my 50hr time came around & got it closer... then i bobbled with the rear tires & got it a little more, but it was never "even or level".

its one of the few complaints you will see about a B2601.
 

Dave_eng

Well-known member
Lifetime Member

Equipment
M7040, Nuffield 465
Oct 6, 2012
4,002
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Williamstown Ontario Canada
Kennyd4110 made an excellent point about rear tire pressures.

Rear tires pressures being not the same can produce this result.

The front pressures do not matter as the front axle pivots.

The importance of the rear tires in the safe use of the loader is demonstrated by the benefit of a rear weight box, loaded rear tires and wheel weight.

With the rear axle firmly planted on the ground, the loader use is much more stable.

Dave
 

lugbolt

Well-known member

Equipment
ZG127S-54
Oct 15, 2015
2,858
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Mid, South, USA
Double check rear tire pressures, or if you're really picky about it, the circumference. Make sure they're the same side-to-side. If that doesn't solve it, grab your favorite block of wood about 12" tall and put it under the low side of the bucket, then put down pressure on it. Just a little. Loosen the loader mounting bolts on the frame, then tighten them. Should get it real close. The mounting frame holes are a little bigger than the bolts and if they're not quite square side-to-side, this is the result. Even 1/8" difference from one side frame to the other is multiplied by the larger distance from each side of the bucket which is about 5 foot wide.

When I used to assemble them at the dealer, I'd always leave the loader frame bolts a little loose, then put down pressure on the bucket while the tractor was on a level shop floor. Then tighten the loader bolts. That way the bucket was as close to level as it was ever going to get; and even then sometimes they were a little off. Sometimes I could use a block under the low side and lift the front of the tractor up off the ground and leave it overnight, and that'd help. Other times not so much. That was mostly with John Deere's chinese loaders but the same principles apply to most any loader that's mounted to a tractor. Another guy that worked with me, but in the other shop, had same issues from time-to-time and we discovered that his part of the shop floor wasn't level.
 

msmcknight

Member

Equipment
B2601
Oct 30, 2017
57
0
6
Statesville, NC, USA
Hi All, it's been a while. I tried to get the dealer to address the issue, but they weren't much help. I'm going to try it myself, but have a few more questions...

1) How do you check the pressure in a fluid-filled rear tire? I rotated the tire so that the valve stem was at the top and then used a regular pressure guage, but it was useless b/c fluid kept coming out with the air.

2) Which bolts are the "loader mounting bolts" ? I think I know, but I'm not sure and don't want to loosen the wrong ones. A picture would be helpful if possible.

3) When tightening the loader mounting bolts back up, what is the torque spec for them, and is there an order of tightening that I should follow?

As always, thanks to you all in advance!
-Michael
 

GeoHorn

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Lifetime Member

Equipment
M4700DT, LA1002FEL, Ferguson5-8B Compactor-Roller, 10KDumpTrailer, RTV-X900
May 18, 2018
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113
Texas
What, exactly, do you plan to do with your loader that makes a 1” out-of-level important?

I can’t imagine that a tractor ever operates on a surface SO level that it makes one IOTA difference.
 
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Jared 756

New member
Jun 9, 2021
17
2
3
Washington ST
We had a whole string of these, we found a level spot of concrete, unbolted the loaders and tried to level them as best as possible - even pulled / tweaked a few to get them right and re-bolted them back up.
 

michigander

Active member

Equipment
B2601
May 29, 2018
383
72
28
Northern Michigan
Hi All, it's been a while. I tried to get the dealer to address the issue, but they weren't much help. I'm going to try it myself, but have a few more questions...

1) How do you check the pressure in a fluid-filled rear tire? I rotated the tire so that the valve stem was at the top and then used a regular pressure guage, but it was useless b/c fluid kept coming out with the air.

2) Which bolts are the "loader mounting bolts" ? I think I know, but I'm not sure and don't want to loosen the wrong ones. A picture would be helpful if possible.

3) When tightening the loader mounting bolts back up, what is the torque spec for them, and is there an order of tightening that I should follow?

As always, thanks to you all in advance!
-Michael
To check tire pressure I jacked mine up and used a new tire gauge from Amazon that could take water. :)

 

msmcknight

Member

Equipment
B2601
Oct 30, 2017
57
0
6
Statesville, NC, USA
Thanks guys. Now it's probably closer to 2" and has really become a problem. Mainly when trying to level out some dirt to install sod where a specific depth is needed to maintain water flow. An uneven blade, even subtle, can change the flow of water. Also its a hassle when digging on a slight incline but the low end hits the ground before the high side does. Most of what I do is shallow surface shaping and an inch or two can throw the whole thing off. When using forks to try and lift logs off of a pile, one fork will go between the logs and the other one jambs into the the upper log, moving the pile rather than just the logs I'm trying to get.

Thanks for the link to the air/water pressure guage... I had no idea such a thing existed. Also for the tip on jacking the tractor up, taking the weight off the tire, before checking the pressure. This is why I come to you guys... so much knowledge and experience!

If someone doesn't mind, can you provide clarification (ie pic) of exactly which are the loader bolts I should loosen, and if possible the torque specs for when I tighten them back. Or maybe point me to in illustrated document that might have the info.

As always, thanks to you all!